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Osatuke honored as outstanding Teaching Assistant

Osatuke is congratulated by Don Viands CALS Associate Dean and Director of Academic Programs

Osatuke is congratulated by Don Viands CALS Associate Dean and Director of Academic Programs

Anya Osatuke, MS student in the Graduate Field of Horticulture, was one of 28 recognized as Outstanding CALS Graduate Teaching Assistants by the Office of Academic Programs at a ceremony held May 11 in the Biotechnology Building.

The students are selected by individual units based on important contributions they have made to the instructional program of the college. Awardees were each presented with a certificate signed by their department chair, an inscribed golden apple and $100 deposited into their Bursar accounts.

Congratulations Class of 2018!

Standing: Steve Reiners (Horticulture Section Chair), Marvin Pritts (Director of Undergraduate Studies for Plant Sciences), Sarah Hetrick '18, Leah Cook (Plant Sciences Major Coordinator), Hauk Boyes '18, and Matthew Siemon '18. Sitting: Sitting: Patricia Chan '18, Benjamin Sword '18, and Cairo Archer '18
Standing: Steve Reiners (Horticulture Section Chair), Marvin Pritts (Director of Undergraduate Studies for Plant Sciences), Sarah Hetrick ’18, Leah Cook (Plant Sciences Major Coordinator), Hauk Boyes ’18, and Matthew Siemon ’18. Sitting: Sitting: Patricia Chan ’18, Benjamin Sword ’18, and Cairo Archer ’18.

Class of ’18 Plants Sciences Majors gathered May 18 for the annual senior luncheon, where they provided feedback on ways to make the program even better.

Horticulture Section Chair Steve Reiners used the occasion to announce this year’s awards and recognitions:

  • Ring Memorial Award: Zeran Lin
  • Ring Memorial Award: Matthew Siemon
  • Melvin B. and Helen K. Hoffman Scholarship: Claire Morrow
  • McNair Scholar: Patrick O’Briant
  • Merrill President Scholar’s Award: Nick Glynos
  • Kenneth Post Award: Benjamin Sword and Myles Collinson
  • American Society for Horticultural Science Student of the Year, Cornell: Hauk Boyes (Agricultural Science major, Horticulture minor)

Congratulations Class of ’18!

Cornell research is growing the hard cider industry in New York

Gregory Peck, assistant professor of horticulture, tags apple trees as part of a research trial at Cornell Orchards.

Gregory Peck, assistant professor of horticulture, tags apple trees as part of a research trial at Cornell Orchards.

Cornell Chronicle 2018-05-15:

To say that hard cider has been making a comeback is an understatement. In the U.S. alone, the hard cider market has increased more than 10-fold in the past decade, with sales reaching $1.5 billion in 2017. And Gregory Peck, assistant professor of horticulture, has been paying attention.

Taking advantage of this upward trend, Peck has been tapping cider’s full potential to grow New York state’s apple market. Now he’s at the forefront of a hard cider renaissance.

“The industry has been booming because cider producers are innovative,” Peck said. “Consumers want to experience something different in their food and drinks. Cider has a rich depth of flavor and range of products that appeal to a large and growing consumer base.”

Read the whole article.

Celebration of student botanical art

Samples of the students' work.

Samples of the students’ work, above.

Students in Marcia Eames-Sheavly’s Intensive Study in Botanical Illustration course (PLHRT 3250) displayed their works for the semester at a lunchtime  ‘gallery walk’ in Plant Science Building May 8. Featured artists included Rosemary Glos:

Rosemary Glos

Bailee Hopkins-Hensley:
name

Myles Collinson:
Miles?

Aliza Doyle:
name

Later in the day, there was an opening in B30 Mann Library celebrating the works Viola Yu completed as her capstone project for her Minor in Horticulture with a Focus in the Botanical Arts, including an extensive mural in a nearby corridor. “The goal is to show how beautiful underground and underwater can be, and then to show the diversity of the world and why we should save it,” said the natural resources major. The inspiring artwork celebrates the connections between soil, oceans and the health of the planet.

Viola Yu with her paintings in Mann Library.
Viola Yu with her paintings in Mann Library.

Seminar video: Grapevine Winter Survival Guide

If you missed Monday’s Horticulture Section seminar, Grapevine Winter Survival Guide with Al Kovaleski, Graduate Field of Horticulture, it is available online.

More seminar videos: Horticulture | School of Integrative Plant Science

Plant Sciences Undergraduate Symposium May 11

flyer click for pdf

  • May 11, 2018 – 1:00 to 4:30 p.m.
  • 233 Plant Science Building
  • Sponsored by the School of Integrative Plant Science.
  • All are welcome. Light refreshments will be served.

Program:

1:00 to 2:30 p.m. – Student presenters:

  • Grant Thompson (PhD candidate)
  • Zeran Lin
  • James Winans
  • Cairo M. Archer
  • Samantha Hackett
  • Allison Coomber
  • William Dahl
  • Jeffrey Yen

2:30 to 3:00 p.m.  – Student poster session:

  • Braulio Castillo
  • Yuqi Chen
  • Felix Fernandez-Penny
  • Annika Gomez
  • Harris Liou
  • Jonathan Price
  • Alan Zhong

3:00 to 4:30 p.m. – Student presenters:

  • Ben Sword
  • Kellie Damann
  • Patrick O’Briant
  • Kady Maser
  • Natalie Roche
  • Patricia Chan
  • Megan Dodge
  • Matthew A. Siemon

Questions? Contact Leah Cynara Cook lcc2@cornell.edu

Hortus Forum Spring Bedding Plant Sale May 11-12

Friday, May 11 – 1 to 5 p.m.
Saturday, May 12 – 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Livestock Pavilion, 48 Judd Falls Road, Ithaca, N.Y.

View variety list.

Mural connects soil, oceans, planetary health

Viola Yu '18 (Photo: Jenny Leijonhufvud)

Viola Yu ’18 (Photo: Jenny Leijonhufvud)

Cornell Chronicle [2018-04-30]:

A new two-part art installation in Mann Library, created by Viola Yu ’18, celebrates the connections among soil, oceans and the health of the planet in paintings and a mural.

Yu, a natural resources major in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, completed the paintings – abstract art representing terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems and depictions of animals and human faces – as the capstone project for her minor in horticulture with a focus in the botanical arts.

“The goal is to show how beautiful underground and underwater can be, and then to show the diversity of the world and why we should save it,” Yu said.

Yu’s paintings can be found in on panels in a computer lab in Mann’s basement and a mural in a corridor leading from the computer lab doors to a stairway.

“We wanted to give this highly trafficked area a welcoming feel and let people know it is an intentional space,” said Eveline Ferretti, Mann’s public programs and outreach administrator.

Ferretti asked Marcia Eames-Sheavly, senior lecturer and senior extension associate in the School of Integrative Plant Science, if she could recommend a student who might be interested. Eames-Sheavly reached out to Yu, who had taken her Art and Horticulture class and is one of her students in botanical illustration.

“If a student is doing something like this for individual study, I always emphasize: What are you learning?” Eames-Sheavly said. “When Viola showed me the pieces on the wall, I have to tell you I was blown away.”

Mann Library celebrates the opening of Yu’s paintings with a reception, free and open to the public, Tuesday May 8, 4:30-5:30 p.m. in B30 Mann.

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