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Plants and Human Well-Being poster display April 30 to May 2 in Mann Library

From Jane Mt. Pleasant and Sonja Skelly:

Students in HORT 2350 (Food, Fiber, and Fulfillment: Plants and Human Well-Being) will have posters on display in the Dean’s Gallery on the second floor of Mann Library from 9am Tuesday April 30 until 3pm Thursday, May 2.

Students have worked in teams to research topics that address the role of plants and human well being. They include issues such as plants in prisons, use of plants for physical health, plants for at-risk youth, plants and tourism, and plants for pollution mitigation.

We hope that you can stop by and see their work.

In the news

Renderings of the greenhouses to be reconstructed at the New York State Agricultural Experiment Station in Geneva, N.Y. Image: O'Brien & Gere.

Renderings of the greenhouses to be reconstructed at the New York State Agricultural Experiment Station in Geneva, N.Y. Image: O’Brien & Gere.

Geneva greenhouses to get $4.7 million upgrade [Cornell Chronicle 2013-04-26] – Agricultural research at Cornell will get a big boost, thanks to a $4.7 million investment in greenhouses at the university’s New York State Agricultural Experiment Station (NYSAES) in Geneva, N.Y. The two-year project, funded by money released by Gov. Andrew Cuomo, will reconstruct 21,000 square feet of greenhouses at NYSAES, which were built during the mid-1950s to the early 1970s. Construction is expected to begin in May 2013 and will transform the greenhouses into much-needed, state-of-the-art facilities.

The Scientist: Prof. Susheng Gan Studies Plant Longevity [Cornell Daily Sun 2013-04-24] – Profile of Susheng Gan’s senescence research: “If the whole senescence process is a drama,” Gan said. “What we are doing is to find the director of the drama, the master regulator gene, from whom we learn quickly how the drama works.”

Season-long leaf testing improves crop profitability [Cornell Chronicle 2013-04-23] – Regularly testing leaf tissue for nutrient levels may significantly enhance the profitability of New York vegetable crops, say Cornell researchers. “Hungry” crops are a common sight in vegetable fields and high tunnels across New York state, says Stephen Reiners, Cornell professor of horticulture and the project leader of the Northern New York Agricultural Development Program’s vegetable fertility project.

Experiential Garden-Based Learning in Belize presentation May 6

Photo: Ava Ryan ’13

Photo: Ava Ryan ’13

From Marcia Eames-Sheavly:

On May 6, students in HORT/IARD 3200: Experiential Garden-Based Learning in Belize will give their final presentation to the Cornell community in Mann 102 at 3:15 p.m.

This will likely involve images, some final project presentations, and and chocolate making and drumming lessons/demonstrations from their time in the village of Barranco.

More information about their trip over spring break.

Dr. Björkman goes to Washington

ASHS delegation meeting the Secretary of Agriculture's conference room in the Whitten Building with his Chief of Staff Krysta Harden.When he’s not busy investigating cover crops or helping to forge an expanded East Coast broccoli industry, Thomas Björkman serves as National Issues Task Force chair for the American Society for Horticultural Science.

On April 25, Björkman was part of an ASHS delegation that visited the offices of 21 Senators and members of Congress, and attended the Horticulture subcommittee hearing on the 2013 Farm Bill.

At the visits to New York members Reed, Maloney, Collins and Gillibrand, Cornell horticultural research and extension were warmly praised and favorable funding for our work enthusiastically supported, reports Björkman.

The delegation also met with Krysta Harden, Sec. of Agriculture Vilsack’s Chief of Staff (right). “We discussed the Secretary’s intention to plan for who our farmers will be in 2062 (USDA’s bicentennial), how they will be trained and what support resources they will have available,” says Björkman.

ASHS Delegation: Essie Fallahi (ASHS International VP, U of Idaho), Gary Bachman (ASHS Extension VP), Dewayne Ingram (ASHS Board Chair, U of Kentucky),Mary Meyer (ASHS President-Elect, U of Minnesota), Paul Bosland (ASHS President, New Mexico State), David Hensley (ASHS Finance Chair, U of Arkansas), John Lea-Cox (ASHS Research VP, U of Maryland), Mike Neff (ASHS Exec Director), Thomas Björkman (ASHS National Issues Task Force chair, Cornell), Tricia Knight (ASHS Research VP-elect), Jeff Olsen (ASHS Extension VP-elect, Oregon State).

ASHS Delegation: Essie Fallahi (ASHS International VP, U of Idaho), Gary Bachman (ASHS Extension VP), Dewayne Ingram (ASHS Board Chair, U of Kentucky),Mary Meyer (ASHS President-Elect, U of Minnesota), Paul Bosland (ASHS President, New Mexico State), David Hensley (ASHS Finance Chair, U of Arkansas), John Lea-Cox (ASHS Research VP, U of Maryland), Mike Neff (ASHS Exec Director), Thomas Björkman (ASHS National Issues Task Force chair, Cornell), Tricia Knight (ASHS Research VP-elect), Jeff Olsen (ASHS Extension VP-elect, Oregon State).

Happy Arbor Day: Students put a price on trees (with bonus video)

 ‘Urban Eden’ students Molly Fancler and John Crespo measure a tree on the Ag Quad to calculate the benefits that tree returns.

‘Urban Eden’ students Molly Fancler and John Crespo measure a tree on the Ag Quad to calculate the benefits that tree returns.

From Students put a price on trees for Arbor Day by Stacey Shackford, Cornell Chronicle 2013-04-25:

This week, students in Creating the Urban Eden: Woody Plant Selection, Design, and Landscape Establishment (HORT/LA 4910/4920) are highlighting why trees are worth hugging, by hanging bright green “price tags” on trunks around the Ag Quad and in an Ithaca park.

Using an online tool, the National Tree Benefit Calculator, students from the course estimated the environmental and economic benefits of 29 trees based on their location, size and species.

“It’s really quite eye-opening for people who think that trees are just nice to look at and don’t have any other value,” said horticulture professor Nina Bassuk, who leads the class alongside landscape architecture professor Peter Trowbridge.

There are also benefits that are not easily quantified, such as wildlife habitats and emotional responses, Bassuk said.

Read the whole story.

See also video segment on YNN news.

Watch the ‘Urban Eden’ class install new landscape around Caldwell Hall on the Ag Quad.

Update 2013-04-27: Second installation outside Bradfield Hall April 25:

Seminar video: Biodiversity on Easter Island

If you missed Monday’s seminar, Biodiversity on Easter Island, featuring the students of HORT 4940, it’s available online.

View more horticulture seminar videos.

Impatiens downy mildew in the news

Impatiens downy mildew is growing more widespread, and can quickly devastate plantings of this popular shady-loving annual flower.

Impatiens downy mildew is growing more widespread, and can quickly devastate plantings of this popular shady-loving annual flower.

Margery Daughtrey, senior extension associate in the Plant Pathology and Plant-Microbe Biology Department, has had a tough time keeping up with demand from reporters this spring as they rush to cover the dramatic spread of impatiens downy mildew.

“Deer, chipmunks and plagues of locusts have been blamed for the sudden loss of leaves on impatiens — many gardeners who have seen the problem have not yet figured out that it was a plant disease that destroyed their plants,” she told the Chicago Tribune.

In the last week Daugherty was cited in articles of three of the leading papers in the country:

Fortunately, impatiens aren’t your only flower option for shady sites. For alternatives, see this factsheet from Nora Catlin, CCE Suffolk County.

Art of Horticulture video in Daily Sun

Update 2013-04-24: See also Cornell Daily Sun article The Scientist: Prof. Marcia Eames-Sheavly Teaches Art Through Horticulture.

The online edition of The Cornell Daily Sun features this interview with Art of Horticulture instructor Marcia Eames-Sheavly.

In the news

John Suscovich, founder of Farm Marketing Solutions and host of the Growing Farms podcast, leads a session on podcasting at the "Telling Better Stories" workshop.

John Suscovich, founder of Farm Marketing Solutions and host of the Growing Farms podcast, leads a session on podcasting at the “Telling Better Stories” workshop.

Media workshop teaches farmers to tell their stories [Cornell Chronicle 2013-04-17] – The Cornell Small Farms Program hosted its first media workshop for farmers, agricultural writers and educators. In addition to basic journalism training, “Telling Better Stories,” held April 11, offered pointers on podcasting, photography and online writing.

New Study of Climate Change Paints Dire Picture for Wine Grapes and Wildlife [LINews.com 2013-04-15] – A new study of climate change and wine grapes published earlier this month in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences paints a dire picture for wine grapes and wildlife. Two Cornell University experts in sustainable grape production – Justine E. Vanden Heuvel and Timothy E. Martinson– urge lovers of both not to panic.

The Scientist: Prof. Frank Rossi Helps Grow Better Grass for 2016 Olympics [Cornell Daily Sun 2013-04-10] – Golf is returning to the Olympics in 2016 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, and Prof. Frank Rossi Ph.D ’91, horticulture, is the lead agronomist creating this golf course.

Seminar videos: Public Garden Leadership exit seminars

If you missed Monday’s Department of Horticulture seminar, you missed two presentations by Public Garden Leadership MPS candidates Katie King and Erin McKeon, they’re now available online:

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