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Congratulations Bridget and Jackie!

bridget and jackie with Dean Boor

Community members from across the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences gathered with friends and family Nov. 5 to celebrate the 15th annual Research, Extension and Staff Awards. The awards observe important and far-reaching achievements of CALS faculty and staff, who are nominated for continuously surpassing expectations and making significant, unique contributions to the college.

Two Horticulture Section staffers were among those honored, Jackie Nock and Bridget Cristelli. (Bridget recently departed the section to take a graduate student coordinator position at the Dyson School.)

“I am awestruck by the important and far-reaching achievements of our colleagues across the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences,” said Kathryn J. Boor ’80, the Ronald P. Lynch Dean of CALS. “Tonight’s honorees contribute to the life-changing work of CALS. Their research and extension activities epitomize the Land Grant mission of Cornell CALS — which is to be fundamentally invested in improving the lives of people, their environments and their communities in New York and around the world.

Read more about why Jackie and Bridget were honored.

Other familiar faces to the Horticulture Section were also honored: Christy Hoepting, Cornell Cooperative Extension Regional Agriculture Team,  Sarah Pethybridge, assistant professor in the Plant Pathology and Plant-Microbe Biology Section, and Tara Reed, School of Integrative Plant Science.

 

Seminar video: The Challenges of Farming in New York City

If you missed Monday’s Horticulture Section seminar, The Challenges of Farming in New York City with Yolanda Gonzalez and Sam Anderson, Cornell Cooperative Extension, it is available online.

More seminar videos: Horticulture | School of Integrative Plant Science

Hortus Forum prepares for annual Poinsettia Sale

Reposted from the SIPS blog, Discovery that Connects:

Hortus Forum members at the 2017 Poinsettia Sale

Hortus Forum members at the 2017 Poinsettia Sale

The trees may still be showing fall color, but Hortus Forum is busy getting ready for the winter holiday.  A subset of the club’s members are growing over 500 poinsettias in 16 different varieties ranging from “Christmas Feelings Merlot” to “Whitestar” and “Venus Hot Pink”. Pre-order yours today and select from one of these beautiful varieties!

Hortus Forum’s mission is to provide a welcoming community for all plant enthusiasts and cultivate an appreciation for plants and horticulture in the broader Cornell community through sales and hands-on experience with horticulture. All profits from our annual Poinsettia Sale will go towards paying for greenhouse space and funding club activities that provide members with the opportunity to explore the world of horticulture.

Seminar video: Roots and rhizosphere interactions of temperate forest tree species in a changing climate

If you missed Tuesday’s Graduate Field of Horticulture exit seminar, Roots and rhizosphere interactions of temperate forest tree species in a changing climate with Marie Zwetsloot, PhD candidate, it is available online.


More seminar videos: Horticulture | School of Integrative Plant Science

Seminar video: Hands-on Learning in Horticulture

If you missed Monday’s Horticulture Section seminar, Hands-on Learning in Horticulture with Jacqueline Ricotta, Delaware Valley University, it is available online.

More seminar videos: Horticulture | School of Integrative Plant Science

8,000 bulbs planted in 11 minutes

bulb planter and class

Students in Bill Miller’s Annual and Perennial Plant Identification and Use class (PLHRT 3000) got a lesson in efficient bulb planting October 30. Using a tractor-drawn bulb planter imported from The Netherlands that slices open the sod, drops in the bulbs and then replaces the sod over them, they planted more than 8,000 bulbs in less than 11 minutes.

That’s a strip more than 200 feet long and 3 feet wide along the edge of Caldwell Field near the McConville Barn. The “naturalized” planting of daffodils, hyacinths, tulips, crocuses, scilla, muscari and chionodoxa bulbs will push up through the turf before the grass begins to grow in spring.

Based on the class’s experiences planting bulbs by hand earlier this semester, Miller estimates that it would have taken the students more than a week to accomplish this task using hand tools. He tested out the planter last fall planting 30,000 bulbs into sod strips totaling more than 2,000 feet at the Cornell Botanic Gardens (view video) and the NYSIP Foundation Seed Barn.

“This machine greatly reduces the labor required to establish naturalized bulb plantings,” says Miller, a professor in the Horticulture Section of the School of Integrative Plant Science and director of Cornell’s Flower Bulb Research Program, who was aided by CUAES field assistant Jonathan Mosher.

“Some people might be concerned about the lack of precise placement of the bulbs,” notes Miller. “But actually most bulbs are forgiving about how deep they are planted, despite what you might see on the labels. They also do fine if not planted right side up.”

Miller hopes that planters like this might catch on with commercial landscapers and municipalities and result in more naturalized bulb plantings.  A benefit of this approach can be less mowing of turf areas due to the need to let the bulb foliage die back naturally.  In such areas, landscapers could substantially reduce carbon emissions from maintenance activity leading to a more sustainable landscape, Miller says.

Seminar video: A sweet journey – Structural and physiological constraints on phloem transport

If you missed Monday’s Horticulture Section seminar, A sweet journey – Structural and physiological constraints on phloem transport with Jessica Savage, University of Minnesota, Duluth, it is available online.

More seminar videos: Horticulture | School of Integrative Plant Science

Seminar video: Tropical Plant Exploration, Introduction and Evaluation for the 21st Century

If you missed Monday’s Horticulture Section seminar, Tropical Plant Exploration, Introduction and Evaluation for the 21st Century with Chad Husby, Fairchild Tropical Botanical Garden, it is available online.

More seminar videos: Horticulture | School of Integrative Plant Science

Toward Sustainability Foundation grant deadline is Dec. 3

Hannah Swegarden was one of the investigators for the 2018 TSF-funded project, Connecting Consumer Acceptability and Farm Productivity to Improve Collard Varieties for East African Growers.

Hannah Swegarden was one of the investigators for the 2018 TSF-funded project, Connecting Consumer Acceptability and Farm Productivity to Improve Collard Varieties for East African Growers.

For more nearly 20 years, CALS has bolstered its sustainability research with a steady stream of gifts from the Toward Sustainability Foundation (TSF), a Massachusetts-based organization founded by an anonymous, eco-minded Cornell alumna.

Since 1999, TSF provided more than $1.5 million in funding for more than 100 faculty and student projects that examine the technological, social, political, and economic elements of sustainable agriculture.

The deadline for proposals for the 2019 round of funding is December 3, 2018

Read more about TSF grants, download the full Request for Proposals, and view titles and contacts of recent projects.

Growing the World’s Food in Greenhouses

Neil Mattson

Cornell Research website:

Neil Mattson, School of Integrative Plant Science, Horticulture Section, spent his childhood on a farm with flower and vegetable gardens. “If you know how to grow your own food, you’ll never go hungry,” Mattson recalls his grandmother, who grew up during the Great Depression, saying. “That ethos has carried with me.” And it has carried into his research projects, which aim to better understand controlled environment agriculture (CEA)—the cultivation of crops in controlled environments such as greenhouses, plant factories, or vertical farms.

Mattson is particularly interested in CEA. He says, “It integrates technology and agriculture and enables year-round production of high quality products.” For example, one can produce 20 to 50 times more lettuce per acre in a greenhouse than in a field in California.

Even so, there are challenges and drawbacks to growing crops in controlled environments, including the amount of energy and labor costs required. Given the challenges, one of the main questions driving Mattson’s work is essential: Is it realistic and economically viable to scale up CEA to feed the masses? “I’m trying to understand the pros and cons of this higher tech production system and want to understand its constraints and improve upon the constraints,” Mattson says.

Read the whole article.

 

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