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Online botanical illustration courses start May 29

Hellebore watercolor by Marcia Eames-Sheavly

Learn botanical illustration online.  Three courses taught by Marcia Eames-Sheavly start May 29, 2018:

You can view works by students in previous classes on display in the cases in the west wing of the first floor of Plant Science Building. The course webpages also have links to previous students who have posted their works online.

Seminar video: The rhizosphere microbiome …

If you missed Monday’s Horticulture Section seminar, The rhizosphere microbiome: sources of variation and links to plant function with Bryan Emmett, Boyce Thompson Institute, it is available online.

More seminar videos: Horticulture | School of Integrative Plant Science

Seminar video: Mineral Nutrition of Phalaenopsis, with focus on nitrogen

If you missed Monday’s Horticulture Section seminar, Mineral Nutrition of Phalaenopsis, with focus on nitrogen with Yao-Chien Alex Chang, National Taiwan University, it is available online.

More seminar videos: Horticulture | School of Integrative Plant Science

Michael Dickson, breeder of orange cauliflower, dies

Michael Dickson

Michael Dickson

CALS News [2018-04-05]:

Michael Hugh Dickson, professor emeritus in the Horticulture Section of the School of Integrative Plant Science, died March 28 at age 85.

Dickson gained fame for his work as a breeder of orange cauliflower, a variety high in beta carotene, which is used by the human body to make the essential nutrient vitamin A.

“Although Mike was known worldwide for his cauliflower work, he did so much more,” said Steve Reiners, professor and chair of the Horticulture Section. “He was a great collaborator; he worked with plant pathologists to develop disease-resistant snap beans and cabbage and he worked with entomologists to develop insect-resistant crucifers. He also developed beans that grew better in our cool New York soils.”

Read the whole article.

 

Horticulture honor society inducts 28 new members

pax key

Phi Alpha Xi key

From Mark Bridgen, Professor and Pi Alpha Xi advisor:

Pi Alpha Xi (PAX), the national honor society for horticulture, inducted  a near-record 28 new members at a March 23, 2018 ceremony held in the H. H. Whetzel Room in the Plant Science Building on the Cornell University campus. Only the best students in the plant sciences are invited to join this national honor society.

Pi Alpha Xi was founded in 1923 at Cornell University and Cornell is the Alpha Chapter. Originally, it was the national honor society for floriculture, landscape horticulture and ornamental horticulture. In recent years it has changed and now honors excellence in all aspects of horticulture.

Since its founding, PAX has grown to 36 chapters at baccalaureate-granting institutions. Its mission is to promote scholarship, fellowship, professional leadership, and the enrichment of human life through plants. PAX was very active at Cornell University for many years, peaking in the 1970s. But the chapter went dormant for several years until its revival in 2013.

PAX inductees and officers with advisors Mark Bridgen (seated left) and Neil Mattson (seated right).

PAX inductees and officers with advisors Mark Bridgen (seated left) and Neil Mattson (seated right).

Graduating PAX seniors received their honor cords.

Graduating PAX seniors received their honor cords.

Also inducted into PAX: Karl NIklas, professor, Plant Biology Section (left) and Ed Cobb, research support specialist in the Plant Biology Section. Also pictured: Bridgen, Horticulture Section chair Steve Reiners, and Mattson.

 

Seminar video: Diversified weed management in NY vegetable crops

If you missed Monday’s Horticulture Section seminar, Diversified weed management in NY vegetable crops – Challenges and opportunities with John Wallace, Horticulture Section, Cornell University, it is available online.

More seminar videos: Horticulture | School of Integrative Plant Science

Seminar video: Malus collection in the US National Plant Germplasm System

If you missed Monday’s Horticulture Section seminar, Malus collection in the US National Plant Germplasm System with C. Thomas Chao, USDA-ARS Plant Genetic Resources Unit, Geneva, N.Y., it is available online.

More seminar videos: Horticulture | School of Integrative Plant Science

New seed company restores vegetable flavor to savor

Row 7 Seed Co. founders, from left, Matthew Goldfarb, Michael Mazourek and Dan Barber.

Row 7 Seed Co. founders, from left, Matthew Goldfarb, Michael Mazourek and Dan Barber.

Cornell Chronicle, CALS News [2018-02-27]

Cornell plant breeder Michael Mazourek, Ph.D. ’08, noted chef Dan Barber and seed producer Matthew Goldfarb have launched a new vegetable seed company and catalog. The freshly minted Row 7 Seed Co. offers seeds that can turn a container garden or backyard plot into a summer vegetable bounty any foodie will crave.

“One of the biggest lessons I’ve learned working with breeders is that there’s a huge link between flavor and nutrition, and the craziest part is that no one talks about it. Flavor and aroma compounds – the same ones that make tomatoes and melons mouthwatering – often derive from essential nutrients. It’s nature’s way of telling us what we should be eating,” said Barber, of Blue Hill, a farm-to-table restaurant in New York City, who frequently collaborates with Mazourek.

“Similar to how the farm-to-table movement increased public awareness around the provenance of ingredients, with Row 7 we want to shift the culture around food to drive people toward more flavorful ingredients and define nutrition in terms of diets, not single ingredients,” he said.

Read the whole article.

More coverage:

Seminar video: Arboriculture – An Italian prospective on research

If you missed Monday’s Horticulture Section seminar, Arboriculture: An Italian prospective on research with Francesco Ferrini, University of Florence, it is available online.

More seminar videos: Horticulture | School of Integrative Plant Science

Rossi recognized for environmental efforts

Frank Rossi and McGraw Tower

Associate professor and turfgrass specialist Frank Rossi has been an intellectual force behind some of the most environmentally conscious concepts embraced by the golf industry. A profile in GCM Magazine celebrating Rossi’s selection as the GCSAA’s 2018 President’s Award for Environmental Stewardship notes that he is “renowned for his hands-on work with golf superintendents and  reputation for challenging convention at every turn.”

Read the whole article.

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