Archive for the “News” Category

Lindsay Jordan

Lindsay Jordan

Mark you calendar…

Lindsay Jordan (MS ’14) will deliver her Dreer Award seminar detailing her recent adventures exploring cool-season viticulture in New Zealand February 4 at 12:15 p.m. in Plant Science 22.

The Frederick Dreer Award, administered by the Horticulture Section of the School of Integrative Plant Science, funds one or more students to spend 4 months to up to a year abroad pursuing his or her interests related to horticulture.

See the instructions that spell out the applications procedure. Basically it is quite simple. Submit a written proposal to the Dreer Committee by the deadline (March 2, 2015 in this cycle), which is followed by an informal interview, generally in a week or two. The horticulture faculty receive the recommendation of the Dreer Committee and vote on the nominee.

dreer award poster

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Thompson receives his award from NEWSS Past President Dwight Lingenfelter

Thompson receives his award from NEWSS Past President Dwight Lingenfelter

Horticulture PhD student Grant Thompson (Kao-Kniffin Lab) won best graduate student presentation (out of 18 entries) place at the 69th Annual Meeting of the  Northeastern Weed Science Society (NEWSS) January 6 in Williamsburg, Va. Thompson’s talk  was titled “Investigating the effects of Pale Swallowwort (Vincetoxicum rossicum) on soil microbial processes.” Congratulations Grant!

The Scientist: Prof. Bruce Reisch Develops New Grape Varieties [Cornell Daily Sun 2015-01-21] – “If I have a disease resistant, cold hardy grape but it makes terrible wine, nobody would plant it. If I have a disease resistant grape that makes fantastic wine but doesn’t survive the winter, very few people would plant it,” Reisch said. “What is really important is getting the combination of traits into one variety.”

Eye on the next generation: New Ag Station director looking toward the future [Finger Lakes Times 2015-01-19] – When people bite into an apple, slice a tomato or sip a glass of wine, Susan Brown hopes they will remember the local research that may have made it possible.

Hard Cider a Big, But Complex, Opportunity [Lancaster Farming 2015-01-17] – Millennials, the current generation of young adults, are driving the hard cider boom. They are more willing than previous generations to spend money on good food and alcohol, said Ian Merwin, a Cornell University professor emeritus and owner of Black Diamond Farm in Trumansburg, N.Y.

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orchards-internships

Cornell Orchards internships provide:

  • Research experience (field and lab)
  • Hands-on field experience (grapes, apples, peaches, berries)
  • Opportunities to interact closely with Cornell pomology faculty
  • Opportunities to interact with local vineyards and orchards

Pay:  $11/hour

Internships are for Cornell students only, and are designed for students with an interest in fruit crop production and physiology.

To apply, send resume and contact information for two references to: Dr. Justine Vanden Heuvel: jev32@cornell.edu

 

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apple ipm coverApple IPM for Beginners is a new series of simplified factsheets and scouting guides that make integrated pest management easier for beginners.

Topics include:

  • Choosing Sprays
  • Apple Scab
  • Fire Blight
  • Powdery Mildew
  • Apple Rust Diseases
  • Summer Diseases
  • Plum Curculio
  • Worms in Fruit
  • Aphids and Leafhoppers
  • Mites
  • Trunk Borers

Deborah I. Breth, Cornell Cooperative Extension Lake Ontario Fruit Program edited the publication with contributions from CCE educators, growers and others.

You can download the free online version or contact Breth for hard-copy purchase information: dib1@cornell.edu

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Kenong Xu's research will help researches change tree architecture allowing more high-density planting and transforming the layout of orchards. (Robyn Wishna photo.)

Kenong Xu’s work will help researchers change tree architecture, allowing more high-density planting and transforming the layout of orchards. (Robyn Wishna photo.)

Cornell Chronicle [2015-01-12]

A Cornell-U.S. government research team is poised to transform the shape of trees and orchards to come, thanks to a $1.5 million grant from the National Science Foundation Plant Genome Research Program.

The project, “Elucidating the Gene Networks Controlling Branch Angle and the Directional Growth of Lateral Meristems in Trees,” is led by Kenong Xu, assistant professor of horticulture at the New York State Agricultural Experiment Station in Geneva, and plant molecular biologist Chris Dardick and research engineer Amy Tabb from the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Appalachian Fruit Research Laboratory in West Virginia.

The research team is seeking to uncover genes and gene networks that underpin how apical control – the inhibitory effect on a lateral branch’s growth by the shoots above it – influences branch growth in apple and peach trees.

Read the whole article.

 

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What varieties will perform best in your garden?

What varieties will perform best in your garden?

Just in time for arrival of this year’s crop of seed catalogs, the 2015 edition of Selected List of Vegetable Varieties for Gardeners in New York State is now available online.

The varieties listed in this report should be well adapted for most home gardens in New York State, offer relatively high quality, be dependable, possess disease and insect resistance when possible, and have a relatively long harvest period.

There may be varieties not listed in the report that will perform satisfactorily in your garden, or even better under certain conditions. If you’d like to dive into a larger pool of varieties as you plan you garden, visit our Vegetable Varieties for Gardeners website for detailed descriptions and seed sources of more than 6,100 varieties. At the site, you can compare varieties, read ratings and reviews by fellow gardeners, and offer your own observations of which varieties perform best in your garden.

And if you’re looking for growing tips, check out our vegetable growing guides.

Best of luck with your 2015 growing season.

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Susan Brown

Susan Brown

Message from Susan Brown, the Goichman Family Director of the New York State Agricultural Experiment Station and Herman M. Cohn Professor of Agriculture and Life Sciences:

Research and extension at Cornell’s New York State Agricultural Experiment Station —Cornell’s Geneva campus — is addressing challenges and opportunities in specialty crops. We are an integral part of the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, and our faculty have academic homes in the departments of Entomology and Food Science and in the sections of Plant Pathology and Plant-Microbe Biology (PPPMB) and Horticulture in the School of Integrative Plant Science (SIPS).

Our primary focus on fruits and vegetables is complemented by research and extension on additional key plants, including turfgrass, biofuel willow and hops. From investigating and mitigating new diseases and insects, to developing new varieties, or perfecting a food or beverage formulation, Cornell scientists at Geneva have enthusiasm and passion for projects that benefit growers and consumers alike.

Our goal is to produce better food, from almost every aspect imaginable—new varieties with better nutritional quality, better eating quality and resistance to diseases as well as better products from the raw ingredients.  Our scientists also work to develop growing systems that maximize quality in the field, orchard and vineyard;  sharing these techniques with growers produces a superior product for consumers to enjoy.

Several of our programs work directly with growers and entrepreneurs and to troubleshoot their individual problems. The Food Venture Center helps entrepreneurs develop safe new products, the New York State Wine Analytical Laboratory aids producers in solving problems, and our Good Agricultural Practices Program (GAPS) teaches producers to meet and exceed food safety standards for handling produce.  Growers, producers, entrepreneurs, established businesses and consumers benefit directly from our expertise.

Read Brown’s full message.

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Via CALS Notes:

On Nov. 10, Dean Kathryn Boor, Cornell Cooperative Extension Director and Associate Dean Chris Watkins, and more than 100 guests celebrated the College of Agriculture and Life Science’s best and brightest at the 11th annual Research, Extension and Staff Awards.

Part of the program was dedicated to the Core Value Staff Awards, created in 2010 and designed to recognize individuals or teams who have gone far beyond the standards defined by Cornell’s Skills for Success.

“These awards go to staff who consistently go above and beyond the call in their day-to-day activities,” Boor said, “and we are happy to highlight their dedication and accomplishments.”

This year the dean presented two awards for Unsung Hero. The award recognizes a team player whose accomplishments extend beyond the guidelines of a specific category.

 

 Dean Kathryn Boor presents 'Unsung Hero' award to Craig Cramer November 10.


Dean Kathryn Boor presents ‘Unsung Hero’ award to Craig Cramer November 10.

The first Unsung Hero Award was presented to Craig Cramer, an extension communication specialist in the Horticulture section in the School of Integrative Plant Science.

Cramer is a key point person for the communications needs of the new school. He works closely with CALS Communications to help cover events and accomplishments by faculty, students and staff. He keeps websites updated and evolving, writes blog posts and articles, partners with CALS Communications for press releases, and is an excellent photographer and videographer. He is often found visiting classes or attending field days, conferences, and other events to capture Horticulture’s exciting work in action.

In short, he does whatever it takes to get the word out about Plant Science’s exciting research, teaching and extension.

Dean Boor also noted that each year, Cramer learns new skills and takes on more responsibilities, even regularly offering seminars to students and extension educators on topics like “writing for the Internet” and “creating digital art.” Masterful at presenting information in an engaging way, he enthusiastically accepts new communications challenges, such as helping a class produce posters that advertise the quantifiable value of trees to our community or editing the “Cornell Guide for Growing Fruit at Home,” which won an award for best new publication.

 

Dean Kathryn Boor presents 'Unsung Hero' award to Steven McKay November 10.

Dean Kathryn Boor presents ‘Unsung Hero’ award to Steven McKay November 10.

The second Unsung Hero Award was presented to Steven McKay, farm manager at the Thompson Vegetable Research Farm in Freeville, N.Y.

McKay’s technical role is to support the activities of 20-25 faculty researchers from more than a half a dozen departments who are investigating diverse questions associated with vegetables in New York. He oversees 260 acres of farmland, managing all aspects of land preparation, pest management, staff assignments and equipment purchases.

However, Boor said, his impact and reputation have expanded well beyond a support role.

He works long hours and is available 24/7, sharing his expertise with faculty and graduate students to help maximize the impact of their results. Field experiments are, by their nature, at the mercy of the elements, but Steve cares so deeply about on-farm experiments that he routinely goes beyond expectations to ensure their success.

For example, during Tropical Storm Lee, severe flooding jeopardized field trials at the farm. Due to the mud, it was impossible to use a tractor to apply fungicide treatments to one of the experiments, so Steve trudged through the mucky fields with a backpack sprayer to save the day.

During a time when sustainability and efficiency are key, he is a true forward-thinking leader. He has transitioned much of the farm to drip irrigation to reduce water usage by 80 percent, and he shuttered the Thompson lab building to save thousands of dollars annually on heating and utility costs.

The dean said his curiosity, creativity and ingenuity benefit everyone who depends on the farm – he is a lifelong learner who is always seeking new and improved practices. She noted that McKay even challenged an engineering class with a contest to design improved drainage and irrigation systems, and then implemented the winning design at the farm.

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Cathy Heidenreich

Cathy Heidenreich

Update [2014-12-18, 09:30]:

Calling hours and funeral service for Cathy Heidenreich have been set for Saturday, December 20. Calling hours will be 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at the Maranatha Baptist Church, 8721 Travell-Knapps Corners Road, Lyons. A funeral service will follow the calling hours at 12:30 p.m. Family burial will be at a later date in Camden, NY. In lieu of flowers, donations may be given in her name to Maranatha Baptist Church, 7821 Travell-Knapps Road, Lyons, NY 14489 where she was a faithful member.

Obituary.


From Tom Burr, director, New York State Agricultural Experiment Station (NYSAES) [2014-12-16, 16:46]:

It is with great sadness that I must share the news that long-time member of the NYSAES community, Cathy Heidenreich, was killed earlier today in an automobile accident. Few details are available at this time.

All those in Plant Pathology, Horticulture, Extension and the agricultural community who worked with her knew Cathy to be a valuable, generous, kind and caring member of the many research and extension teams to which she contributed her skill, knowledge, creativity and sense of humor. She brought great credit to Cornell, CALS and the Geneva Experiment Station over many years and her presence will be sorely missed. All of us extend our deepest sympathy to Cathy’s husband, Gregg, and the entire family.

Please join us, Wednesday, December 17, 2014 for comfort and coffee at 11 a.m. in Barton Hall, Room A137. Cindy Glanville from the Faculty Staff and Assistance Program will be joining those who wish to attend. Cindy will also be available throughout the day Wednesday.

We will share additional information as we learn more.

Cathy explains low-tunnel strawberry research to growers at 2012 Berry Open House at Cornell Orchards.

Cathy explains low-tunnel strawberry research to growers at 2012 Berry Open House at Cornell Orchards.

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Hellebore watercolor by Marcia Eames-Sheavly

Learn botanical illustration online.  Three courses taught by Marcia Eames-Sheavly start January 26, 2014:

You can view works by students in previous classes on display in the cases in the west wing of the first floor of Plant Science Building. The course webpages also have links to previous students who have posted their works online.

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