Archive for the “News” Category

32 varieties. 2 pot sizes. Online ordering. What more could you ask for?

Visit Hortus Forum’s Facebook page or go directly to the club’s online ordering page to view your options.

If you have questions or prefer not to order online, contact club president David Harris: dch92@cornell.edu

hofo-poinsettias

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'Wee Stinky' at dawn November 14.

‘Wee Stinky’ at dawn November 14.

While it is difficult to predict exactly when, the Cornell University Titan Arum (dubbed ‘Wee Stinky’ when it flowered for the first time in March 2012) is poised to flower again.

Visiting Hours

Visiting Hours: 9:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m.

Hours will be extended once the plant blooms. For updates watch our Twitter and Facebook feeds.

You can also view the titan arum on a live webcamtrack its growth in numbers and images, and read updates on our blog.

Cornell Daily Sun science editor Kathleen Bitter previews the impending bloom in ‘Wee Stinky’ to Bloom For First Time Since 2012.

To learn more about Titan Arums, you can also view the Titan Arum YouTube playlist. Here’s a sample:

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Processor and seed company representatives sample frozen peas at NYSAES ‘cuttng’.

Processor and seed company representatives sample frozen peas at NYSAES ‘cuttng’.

More than 40 people attended the annual fall processing vegetable ‘cutting’ November 6 to sample and compare canned and frozen peas, sweet corn, and snap beans trialed at the New York State Agricultural Experiment Station, Geneva, N.Y.

“It was the best turnout we’ve ever had,” says Jim Ballerstein, the research support specialist who manages the processing vegetable trials.

Attendees included representatives from processing and seed companies, including the top three vegetable seed companies in the world, adds Ballerstein.

The cutting included samples of 50 pea cultivars, 55 snap beans (canned and frozen), and 63 sweet corns (frozen kernel and whole ear).

Learn more about processing vegetable trials at NYSAES.

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Susan Brown

Susan Brown

Tune in this afternoon to hear Susan Brown, associate director of the New York State Agricultural Experiment Station (NYSAES), discuss Apple Science, From American Beauty to Zestar on Science Friday.

The show runs from 2 to 4 p.m. on public radio stations across the country and we expect Susan to be on during the first hour.  (Likely around 2:20 p.m.) You can listen locally on 89.5 FM in Geneva or on 91.5 FM in Ithaca. You can also stream it on ScienceFriday.com or  listen to the podcast after the show airs.

Here’s the episode summary from the SciFri website:

The humble apple wears many faces, from the crisp and crunchy Honeycrisp to the soft and tannic Mac. How did apples get so diverse? Apple breeder Susan Brown explains the ins-and-outs of apple reproduction and reveals how modern plant genetics allows her to “stack the deck” in favor of crisp and sweet offspring. Plus, orchardist and apple historian Dan Bussey introduces us to some weird and wonderful heritage breeds.

 

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Barton Laboratory Greenhouse


Following a multimillion-dollar makeover, the Barton Laboratory Greenhouse was dedicated Oct. 30 at the New York State Agricultural Experiment Station in Geneva, New York. (Photo: Rob Way, CALS Communications)

Cornell Chronicle [2014-11-05]:

Researchers at the New York State Agricultural Experiment Station (NYSAES) in Geneva, New York, have a fully modernized network of greenhouses now that Barton Laboratory Greenhouse’s multimillion-dollar makeover is complete.

During a ribbon-cutting ceremony Oct. 30, NYSAES welcomed New York state Sen. Michael Nozzolio ’73, M.S. ’77, who helped secure a $4.7 million grant for the reconstruction project in April 2013.

Nozzolio (R-54th Dist.) credited the agricultural research conducted at NYSAES with being an economic driver for the region as well as the entire state.

“The research that makes agriculture the number one industry in this state is done here,” Nozzolio said. “The reason why we have over 250 wineries in this state, and well over 110 right in the Finger Lakes region, is because of the research done here. Whether it’s Dr. Susan Brown making new varietals of apples, whether it’s the grape industry, those jobs in the orchards and the vineyards are in large part thanks to the research done here.”

Read the whole article.

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James Keach

James Keach

We have more good news at Cornell University today because my PhD student, James Keach, is the recipient of the $5,000 Proven Winners Innovations in Plant Breeding Scholarship.

James is in the Graduate Field of Plant Breeding and is researching interspecific compatibility and trait introgression between Impatiens species and integrating and understanding the basis for resistance to Impatiens Downy Mildew.

Congratulations James!

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plant science signU.S. News and World Report released its rankings of the best university programs on the planet, ranking Cornell #1 in Plant and Animal Science and #3 in Agricultural Sciences.

Read more:

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botanical fashion showOn Monday, six students in the Art of Horticulture (HORT 2010) modeled outfits they fashioned from various plant materials for other students in the course, and answered their classmates’ questions about their materials and process.

Creations ranged from a lion’s mane headdress to an ensemble portraying the Greek myth of Demeter and Persephone.

While the abundant fall foliage was a popular foundation material, other plant materials used by the students included grass seedheads, willow branches, hot peppers, pine needles, mosses, birch bark, citrus skins, acorn caps, various flowers and leaves and more.

View more images in the gallery pages at the Art of Horticulture website. 

 

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periodiCALS coverThere is much of horticultural interest in the Fall 2014 issue of periodiCALS, the magazine of Cornell’s College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, including:

  • Breaking New Ground for Plant and Soil Sciences – Formation of the new School of Integrative Plant Science (page 3).
  • A Nod to Namesakes – How Hedrick Hall (and other buildings) got their names (page 4).
  • Grape Expectations – Aromella and Corot noir (both from Bruce Reisch‘s breeding program) are key ingredients in new beverages (page 8).
  • Rooting for the Apple Industry – U.S. apple industry is on the cusp of a rootstock revolution, thanks in part to Gennaro Fazio‘s breeding program (page 8).
  • A Cause in Common – Michael Mazourek breeds ‘gateway vegetables’ to help fight diabetes.
  • Milestones and Marvels – Minns Garden gate is certainly one of the latter (pages 18-19). Many milestones on subsequent pages of horticultural interest, including development of CU-Structural Soil by Nina Bassuk and Nina Trowbridge and planting of first fruit trees at Cornell Orchards.
  • A Practical Science: Agricultural Biotechnology in Focus – Details John Sanford‘s pioneering contributions (page 24).
  • An Award Winning Vintner – One of the first graduates of Cornell’s Viticulture and Enology program, Nova Cadamatre ‘06 named one of ‘40 under 40: America’s Tastemakers’ by Wine Enthusiast magazine (page 29).
  • Facts in Five – Features Justine Vanden Heuvel‘s ‘Redolent Rieslings’, Susan Brown‘s ‘Cider Sources’ and Bill Miller‘s ‘Boozy Bulbs’.

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sports turf management homepageThe new Cornell Sports Field Management website provides sports turf managers with the latest best management practices and resources they need to maintain  safe and functional school and community sports fields.

The site includes information about soils, grass varieties, routine care (mowing, fertilizing, watering, etc.), integrated pest management and more. Interactive schedules for different levels of management and seasons that fields are in use make it easier for managers to time their field operations.

Recognizing that sports turf managers don’t work in isolation, the site also provides information for coaches, athletic directors, administrators, community members and others to help them understand how their decisions can affect turf quality and field safety.

The site was developed by the Cornell Turfgrass team with input from Cornell Cooperative Extension colleagues and sports turf grounds managers from across New York State. Funding was provided by the Community IPM Initiative of the New York State Integrated Pest Management Program to support New York State schools in implementing the Child Safe Fields Playing Act.

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