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Yale Climate Connections features Bassuk, sustainable landscapes trail

Peterson Lot near Stocking Hall features porous asphalt and a rain garden to reduce runoff.

Peterson Lot near Stocking Hall features porous asphalt and a rain garden to reduce runoff.

Yale Climate Connections is a nonpartisan, multimedia service providing daily broadcast radio programming and original web-based reporting, commentary, and analysis on the issue of climate change. Last week, they featured Nina Bassuk in an episode entitled. A walking trail shows how Cornell is adapting to extreme weather:

“On their way to class, Cornell University students stroll past a garden planted with bayberry and red-twigged dogwood shrubs. But they may not know that this is a rain garden that helps filter and hold water during heavy storms. Cornell horticulture professor Nina Bassuk says the university has been using techniques for sustainable landscapes for a long time, but people didn’t know that they were special in some way.”

Listen to the whole episode:

Learn more about the sustainable landscapes trail.

Hortus Forum Poinsettia Sale Dec. 6&7

If you are looking for some gorgeous poinsettias, whether Tapestry or Red Glitter, Whitestar or Jubilee Jingle Bells, we’ve got you covered!

View all eight varieties available and fill out your pre-order preferences here. Or just come to our sale December 6 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. or December 7 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Yellow Polyhouse 1135C at Post Circle Ithaca, NY.

Hortus Forum is Cornell’s undergraduate horticulture club, cultivating a positive community which fosters a passion for plants and teaches the value of horticulture.

hortus forum poinsettia poster

Majors gather to bake pies

group shot of majors

To get in the holiday spirit, de-stress from prelims, and socialize, new Plant Sciences Majors gathered at the home of Director of Undergraduate Studies Marvin Pritts to bake a variety of pies with help from Plant Sciences Major Coordinator Leah Cook .  A festive time was had by all.

plant sciences majors baking pies

Vanden Heuvel to lead CAU wine masterclass

Fruit of the Vine: The History and Culture of Drinking Wine
Cornell Adult University
February 7–9, 2020

Justine Vanden Heuvel

Take a wine masterclass taught by wise and witty Cornell faculty with CAU. Join horticulturist Justine Vanden Heuvel and classics professor Michael Fontaine for a weekend seminar on the science, history, and culture of drinking wine in Ithaca, New York.

We’ll attend lectures on the Cornell campus, discuss wine pairings over dinner, travel to local Finger Lakes wineries for exclusive tastings, and enjoy lunch and a fireside chat at the historic Aurora Inn.

You’ll leave the weekend with knowledge about the origins of wine, the effects of the environment on crops, and fascinating tales about wine counterfeiting throughout the ages.

Register by November 15th to save 20% off the program fee!

A block of rooms have been reserved at a reduced price at the Statler Hotel, the hub of our on-campus event, for a limited time. Book a room with the link on our program’s website.

View the preliminary schedule.

Moonbeam adds a big bang of flavor to Galaxy tomatoes

Griffiths picking tomatoes

Phillip Griffiths, associate professor of horticulture, picks Moonbeam tomatoes at Cornell AgriTech.

Cornell Chronicle, CALS News [2019-11-06]

Fresh from Cornell AgriTech in Geneva, New York, the newest grape tomato – Moonbeam – has joined a constellation of tasty, small, heirloom-style tomatoes in the 2020 High Mowing Organic Seeds catalog, released Nov. 1 to home gardeners and commercial growers.

“Moonbeam is a very good eating experience from start to finish … from first bite to aftertaste,” said Phillip Griffiths, associate professor of horticulture at Cornell AgriTech, who started developing Moonbeam in 2006 and made it a selection in 2011.

Moonbeam is considered a white grape tomato, with a citrus flavor. In the High Mowing catalog, it joins five other small tomatoes in the catalog’s Cornell-developed Galaxy Suite collection: Supernova, a marbled mini-Roma; Midnight Pear, a small, dark pigmented, pear-shape fruit; Comet, a plump, red grape tomato; Sungrazer, an orange colored grape tomato; and Starlight, a slender, finger-shaped, yellow grape tomato.

The High Mowing catalog called Moonbeam a “glowing white, translucent grape tomato with oblong frame and delicious, fruity bite. This remarkable tomato has dramatic visual appeal, especially when added to a small tomato mix. Not only are these white grape tomatoes stunningly unique, they are packed with a tasty punch of unbeatable flavor.”

Beyond taste, Moonbeam is a highly productive grape tomato – with outstanding texture and exceptional looks – that is suited for home gardens, commercial fields and high tunnels, said Griffiths. It has a good shelf life and it is less likely to split.

Read the whole article.

Bailee Hopkins-Hensley is connecting people to plants

Cornell Chronicle and CALS News [2019-10-22]

Bailee Hopkins-Hensley ’18, MPS ’19, is passionate about exploring the connections that humans have to plants – especially the connections that indigenous communities have to the species that sustain them. Above, Hopkins-Hensley works with local children while interning at the Ithaca Children’s Garden in summer 2017. Photo provided

Bailee Hopkins-Hensley ’18, MPS ’19, is passionate about exploring the connections that humans have to plants – especially the connections that indigenous communities have to the species that sustain them. Above, Hopkins-Hensley works with local children while interning at the Ithaca Children’s Garden in summer 2017. Photo provided

Bailee Hopkins-Hensley ’18, MPS ’19, is passionate about exploring the connections that humans have to plants – especially the connections that indigenous communities have to the species that sustain them. She earned a bachelor’s degree in plant science in 2018 and a Master of Professional Studies in public garden leadership in 2019, but her interest in plants started when she was a child.

Her grandfather loved plants, and Hopkins-Hensley recalls his extensive gardens, both outside and in three rooms that were converted into a conservatory inside their Colorado home. He grew cacti inside and food plants outside. At age 12, she planted her first backyard garden.

“I wanted to explore the types of plants that my ancestors from my mom’s side of my family had planted to sustain themselves,” says Hopkins-Hensley. “I became very interested in the Three Sisters cropping system and tried growing squash, pumpkins and sunflowers.”

Cornell Botanic Gardens, in partnership with Cornell’s School of Integrative Plant Science, offers a one-year MPS program for individuals interested in leading botanic gardens and similar organizations.

Read the whole article.

Toward Sustainability Foundation grant deadline is Dec. 6

For two decades, the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences has bolstered its sustainability research with a steady stream of gifts from the Toward Sustainability Foundation (TSF), a Massachusetts-based organization founded by an anonymous, eco-minded Cornell alumna.

Since 1999, TSF provided more than $1.5 million in funding for more than 100 faculty and student projects administered through the Horticulture Section that examine the technological, social, political, and economic elements of sustainable agriculture.

The deadline for proposals for the 2020 round of funding is December 6, 2019.

Read more about TSF grants, download the full Request for Proposals, and view titles and contacts of recent projects.

Entomologist Scott McArt lead session on pollinator-friendly gardens at Bluegrass Lane.

Entomologist Scott McArt leads a session on pollinator-friendly gardens at the Cornell Floriculture Field Day at Bluegrass Lane. McArt was a co-PI for the TSF-funded project, Assessing methods for and benefits of establishing beneficial insect habitat for growers and gardeners.

Eastern Broccoli Project on track to meet $100M goal

Thomas Bjorkman, professor of horticulture poses with an heirloom style broccoli that he is researching to understand the multitude of broccoli genes available for breeding purposes.

Thomas Bjorkman, professor of horticulture poses with an heirloom style broccoli that he is researching to understand the multitude of broccoli genes available for breeding purposes. Photo: Allison Usavage/Cornell University

By Krishna Ramanujan, Cornell Chronicle [2019-10-17]:

The Eastern Broccoli Project began in 2010 with the goal of growing a $100 million broccoli industry in the Eastern U.S. in 10 years. Currently, the industry is valued at around $90 million and, with two remaining years of funding, Cornell researchers say they are on schedule to meet their goal.

“I think we’re going to hit it,” said Thomas Björkman, Cornell professor of horticulture and the project’s principal investigator.

Between 2012 and 2017, the number of New York state broccoli farms increased from 290 to 535, and the number of Eastern Seaboard broccoli farms doubled. Yet about 85% of the broccoli consumed annually on the East Coast is shipped from California and Mexico, even with widespread enthusiasm for locally grown foods.

One challenge of growing broccoli in the East is that the plant was originally cultivated as a winter vegetable in Mediterranean climates, so trying to grow it in the Eastern U.S. summer – when summer nights exceed 65 degrees Fahrenheit – ends up confusing the plant’s developmental cues.

At such temperatures, the flower buds and heads often grow unevenly, and while perfectly edible, do not look the same as West Coast broccoli. “It’s not at all marketable; you would never see it in a store,” Björkman said.

This year, two new papers clarify issues that should further help to grow the Eastern broccoli industry.

The first paper, a marketing study, “Produce Buyer Quality Requirements to Form an Eastern Broccoli Industry,” was published in the Journal of Food Distribution Research in March.

In the study, the authors – including Philip Coles (MS ’15), professor of practice in the College of Business and Economics at Lehigh University; Miguel Gómez, associate professor at Cornell’s Charles H. Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management; and Björkman – surveyed a group of influential wholesale buyers (those who buy on behalf of supermarkets and are the gatekeepers of quality standards, as opposed to consumers) to gauge whether a growing appetite for local foods might outweigh the fact that Eastern broccoli looks a little different from Western broccoli, which is the industry standard. Though Eastern-adapted varieties are still of high quality, they can have a lighter color or larger flower buds than West Coast varieties.

At the same time, sales of local foods increased from $5 billion to $12 billion between 2008 and 2014, according to Packaged Facts, a food industry research firm.

Read the whole article.

Video: ‘Plant Drop’ Cornell – 1,000 plants in 20 minutes

If you missed last week’s ‘Plant Drop’ outside Appel Commons (or just want to relive it) view this timelapse video of the event.

Organizers gave away 1,000 plants donated by Peace Tree Farms to get new students to engage with the wealth of opportunities at Cornell to learn about and enjoy plants by including a tag in each pot leading students to a webpage detailing opportunities to get involved.

Plant Drop co-sponsors:

Special thanks to Collegiate Plant Initiative for support.

‘Plant Drop’ preview

Lloyd Travern with van full of plants headed for Cornell 'Plant Drop'

In this Facebook video, Lloyd Traven, co-owner of Peace Tree Farm provides a preview of the 1,000 plants headed to Appel Commons for the ‘Plant Drop’ giveaway this afternoon (October 3) at 4:30 p.m. The goal of the drop is to get new students to engage with the wealth of opportunities at Cornell to learn about and enjoy plants. More ‘Plant Drop’ information.

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