Archive for the “News” Category

plant science signU.S. News and World Report released its rankings of the best university programs on the planet, ranking Cornell #1 in Plant and Animal Science and #3 in Agricultural Sciences.

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botanical fashion showOn Monday, six students in the Art of Horticulture (HORT 2010) modeled outfits they fashioned from various plant materials for other students in the course, and answered their classmates’ questions about their materials and process.

Creations ranged from a lion’s mane headdress to an ensemble portraying the Greek myth of Demeter and Persephone.

While the abundant fall foliage was a popular foundation material, other plant materials used by the students included grass seedheads, willow branches, hot peppers, pine needles, mosses, birch bark, citrus skins, acorn caps, various flowers and leaves and more.

View more images in the gallery pages at the Art of Horticulture website. 

 

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periodiCALS coverThere is much of horticultural interest in the Fall 2014 issue of periodiCALS, the magazine of Cornell’s College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, including:

  • Breaking New Ground for Plant and Soil Sciences – Formation of the new School of Integrative Plant Science (page 3).
  • A Nod to Namesakes – How Hedrick Hall (and other buildings) got their names (page 4).
  • Grape Expectations – Aromella and Corot noir (both from Bruce Reisch‘s breeding program) are key ingredients in new beverages (page 8).
  • Rooting for the Apple Industry – U.S. apple industry is on the cusp of a rootstock revolution, thanks in part to Gennaro Fazio‘s breeding program (page 8).
  • A Cause in Common – Michael Mazourek breeds ‘gateway vegetables’ to help fight diabetes.
  • Milestones and Marvels – Minns Garden gate is certainly one of the latter (pages 18-19). Many milestones on subsequent pages of horticultural interest, including development of CU-Structural Soil by Nina Bassuk and Nina Trowbridge and planting of first fruit trees at Cornell Orchards.
  • A Practical Science: Agricultural Biotechnology in Focus – Details John Sanford‘s pioneering contributions (page 24).
  • An Award Winning Vintner – One of the first graduates of Cornell’s Viticulture and Enology program, Nova Cadamatre ‘06 named one of ‘40 under 40: America’s Tastemakers’ by Wine Enthusiast magazine (page 29).
  • Facts in Five – Features Justine Vanden Heuvel‘s ‘Redolent Rieslings’, Susan Brown‘s ‘Cider Sources’ and Bill Miller‘s ‘Boozy Bulbs’.

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sports turf management homepageThe new Cornell Sports Field Management website provides sports turf managers with the latest best management practices and resources they need to maintain  safe and functional school and community sports fields.

The site includes information about soils, grass varieties, routine care (mowing, fertilizing, watering, etc.), integrated pest management and more. Interactive schedules for different levels of management and seasons that fields are in use make it easier for managers to time their field operations.

Recognizing that sports turf managers don’t work in isolation, the site also provides information for coaches, athletic directors, administrators, community members and others to help them understand how their decisions can affect turf quality and field safety.

The site was developed by the Cornell Turfgrass team with input from Cornell Cooperative Extension colleagues and sports turf grounds managers from across New York State. Funding was provided by the Community IPM Initiative of the New York State Integrated Pest Management Program to support New York State schools in implementing the Child Safe Fields Playing Act.

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Liberty Hyde Bailey

Liberty Hyde Bailey

“A Living Sympathy with Everything That Is”
Liberty Hyde Bailey’s Ecological and Civic Vision

Cornell Plantations 70th Anniversary Lecture
 10/29/2014 – 7:30 p.m. – 8:30 p.m.
Statler Hall Auditorium, Cornell University

Scott Peters, Associate Professor, Horticulture Section, School of Integrative Plant Science and Faculty Co-Director, Imagining America: Artists and Scholars in Public Life, Syracuse University

Liberty Hyde Bailey is most frequently remembered as a pioneering horticultural scientist.  But his most important legacy is his prophetic ecological and civic vision, expressed throughout his life work as a publicly engaged scholar.  Join land-grant historian Scott Peters as he unearths wisdom and lessons in Bailey’s work that can inspire and guide the ways we approach the ecological and civic challenges of our time.

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Graduate Field of Horticulture student Miles Sax and supporting faculty received a 2014 TSF grant for the project, Long Term Remediation of Urban Soils With Organic Amendments.

Graduate Field of Horticulture student Miles Sax and supporting faculty received a 2014 TSF grant for the project, Long Term Remediation of Urban Soils With Organic Amendments.

The Horticulture Section in the School of Integrative Plant Science at Cornell’s College of Agriculture and Life Sciences (CALS) requests proposals for innovative research, teaching and extension/ outreach projects involving organics and sustainability in farm and food systems, and managed landscapes including gardens and green spaces.

A gift from the Toward Sustainability Foundation (TSF) will provide support for successful proposals during calendar year 2015. Short proposals are requested with a 6-page maximum (single spaced including an itemized budget, extra pages are allowed for the literature cited section).

We invite grant proposals from Cornell campus-based faculty and staff as well as county-based Cornell Cooperative Extension educators. Student-led proposals are welcome for regional or international research, but a Cornell faculty member must indicate his or her commitment to help guide and support the proposal.

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The votes have been tallied. Rachel Hestrin, PhD candidate in the Graduate Field of Crop and Soil Sciences (Johannes Lehmann lab) won ‘Best Poster’ at the School of Integrative Plant Science retreat October 14.

Congratulations Rachel!

Rachel Hestrin

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From Tim MartinsonNorthern Grapes Project Director,  tem2@cornell.edu:

Northern Grapes Project Director Dr. Timothy Martinson speaks about the training system trials during a field day at Coyote Moon Vineyards in Clayton, N.Y.

Northern Grapes Project Director Tim Martinson speaks about the training system trials during a field day at Coyote Moon Vineyards in Clayton, N.Y.

The Northern Grapes Project received an additional $2.6 million in funding from the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Specialty Crops Research Initiative to complete the final two years of the multistate effort, which began in 2011.

The project focuses on growing extremely cold-hardy wine grape varieties that are new to both growers and consumers, creating a rapidly-expanding industry of small vineyard and winery enterprises.  Dr. Tim Martinson, Senior Extension Associate at Cornell University, leads the project team, which includes research and Extension personnel from ten institutions in the Upper Midwest and Northeast.

“New producers are spread across twelve states, most without an established wine industry,” said Martinson. “By working together, the Northern Grapes Project team provides more resources to producers than would be available if each state had its own effort.”

The new varieties have growth habits and flavor profiles that are quite different from well-known varieties. So the project’s researchers have been working to determine the best ways to grow them, turn them into flavorful wines, and market those wines in local and regional markets.

In the first three years of the project, team members invested heavily in field and laboratory trials, conducted consumer surveys and a baseline survey of the industry, and provided outreach programming to an aggregate audience of more than 7,000.

“The continued success of this project in obtaining funding is testament to the team’s exceptional productivity and to how this project has impacted grape production in northern regions across the Northeast and upper Midwest,” said Dr. Thomas Burr, Director of the New York State Agricultural Experiment Station.

“As a producer, having scientists involved is especially valuable to us as they are conducting rigorous tests to back up our hunches and our theories,” said Dave Greenlee, a project advisory council member and co-owner of Tucker’s Walk Vineyard in Garretson, S.D. Greenlee cites trials of various trellising systems in vineyards and sensory evaluations of wines using different yeast strains in the lab. “These save us time and help us improve our products,” he points out.

The grant was funded by the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture’s Specialty Crops Research Initiative, which supports multi-institution, interdisciplinary research on crops including fruits, vegetables, tree nuts, and ornamentals.  The project includes personnel from Cornell University, the Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station, Iowa State University, Michigan State University, North Dakota State University, South Dakota State University, the University of Minnesota, the University of Nebraska, the University of Vermont, and the University of Wisconsin.

For more information, visit the Northern Grapes Project website at http://northerngrapesproject.org.

High resolution image.

The Northern Grape Project’s webinar series starts November 20, 2014 Steve Lerch, Cornell University and Mike White, Iowa State University on Trellis Design and Construction and Pruning Fundamentals Prior to Your First Cut.

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More than 130 faculty, academics, staff, grad students and others attended the first School of Integrative Plant Science (SIPS) Retreat in Kennedy Hall Tuesday.

That morning, after a welcome from SIPS director Alan Collmer, speakers from each section gave short presentations on their work:

  • Michael Scanlon (Plant Biology), Ontogeny of the grass ligule: how to draw a line on a leaf. (View video.)
  • Courtney Weber (Horticulture), The art and science of berry breeding. (View video.)
  • Michael Gore (Plant Breeding & Genetics), Progress towards building a genetic foundation for biofortification of maize.
  • Harold van Es (Crop and Soil Science), Adapt-N: cloud computing technology to achieve agronomic and environmental objectives. (View video.)
  • Fabio Rinaldi (Plant Pathology & Plant-Microbe Biology), Hitting the Sweet Spot: TAL effectors as tools for targeted gene activation in plants.
Speakers Scanlon, Weber, Gore, van Es and Rinaldi.

Speakers Scanlon, Weber, Gore, van Es and Rinaldi.

Following lunch, a poster session fueled discussion and sharing.

Following lunch, a poster session fueled discussion and sharing.

 

Speaker Weber brought raspberries from his variety trials for sampling at lunch.

Speaker Weber brought raspberries and blackberries from his variety trials for sampling at lunch. (Carol Grove photo.)

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Marvin with berry-themed cakeFaculty, friends, family, staff, students and others gathered Friday to help Horticulture Section chair Marvin Pritts celebrate his 30 years at Cornell.

Congratulations Marvin!

celebrating 30 years of Marvin

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