Archive for the “Undergrad” Category

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Tower Rd bioswale planting

Tower Road bioswale planting

Thursday, students in Creating the Urban Eden: Woody Plant Selection, Design, and Landscape Establishment (HORT/LA 4910/4920) planted more than 1,000 feet of beds along Tower Road from Plant Science Building to Stocking Hall with nearly 1,000 woody shrubs.

The bioswale is designed to channel water runoff from Tower Road into the beds so that the water can infiltrate and recharge groundwater instead of going directly into storm drains and discharged ultimately into Cayuga Lake.

The shrubs were selected based on their ability to tolerate both saturated soil and intermittent dry conditions, as well as tolerance to road salt. That selection was guided by research conducted by former Graduate Field of Horticulture student Ethan Dropkin (MPS ’14).

“These are tough plants that can tolerate challenging conditions,” says Nina Bassuk, director of the Urban Horticulture Institute in the Horticulture Section of the School of Integrative Plant Science. “A lot of snow will pile up on them over the winter, and may damage some of them. But they are the kind of shrubs that you can cut back in spring and they’ll bounce right back.”

Dropkin’s publication, Woody Shrubs for Stormwater Retention Practices (Northeast and Mid-Atlantic Regions) is available online at the Urban Horticulture Institute website.

Bassuk instructs students before planting.

Bassuk instructs students before planting.

Curb cuts channel runoff into into bioswale.

Curb cuts channel runoff into into bioswale.

The shrubs used are tolerant to road salt and intermittent flooding and dry soil conditions.

The shrubs used are tolerant to road salt and intermittent flooding and dry soil conditions.

 

Urban Eden class.

Urban Eden class.

 

 

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hofo-plant-saleHortus Forum, Cornell’s undergraduate horticulture club, will hold it’s first plant sale of the semester this Friday, September 12 from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. in the lobby of Mann Library.

The club grows a wide variety of houseplants on campus in the Kenneth Post Lab greenhouses. Members hold weekly plant sales to cover greenhouse costs and fund educational horticulture trips, service projects, and community social events.

Past trips have been to Costa Rica, Longwood Garden, Holland, and Florida. They also hold a variety of social events during the year with other interests groups.

Find out more about Hortus Forum on Facebook.

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Lindsay Jordan

2013 Dreer Award Winner Lindsay Jordan explored cool-season viticulture in New Zealand

From Nina Bassuk:

The Horticulture Section of the School of Integrative Plant Science offers a wonderful opportunity once a year, the Frederick Dreer Award, that allows one or more students to spend 4 months to up to a year abroad pursuing his or her interests related to horticulture.

See the application and instructions that spells out the procedure for applying. Basically it is quite simple. Submit a written proposal to the Dreer Committee by the deadline (March 2, 2015 in this cycle), which is followed by an informal interview, generally in a week or two. The faculty receives the recommendation of the Dreer Committee and votes on the nominee.

The only obligation of the Dreer award winner is to write to the Dreer Committee monthly while overseas, and upon return to the United States, give a presentation about their time abroad to students and faculty.

Please look into this opportunity seriously. It can be taken as a summer and a semester’s leave or a year’s leave of absence during school or upon graduation. If you would like to talk over a potential idea for the Dreer with a member of the Committee (and we encourage you to do so), please contact Nina Bassuk (Horticulture) Josh Cerra (Landscape Architecture) or Marvin Pritts. (Horticulture).

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students on finished sofa

In what has become an annual tradition, a dozen students in the Art of Horticulture (HORT 2010) installed a sod sofa — this year on the south side of Corson-Mudd Hall. The experience is as much about building teamwork among the students as it is creating a living work of botanical art says  Marcia Eames-Sheavly, Senior Extension Associate and Senior Lecturer in the Horticulture Section of the new School of Integrative Plant Science, who teaches the course

Frank Rossi, associate professor and turf specialist in the Horticulture Section, provided additional coaching, and shared lively guidance that ranged from the science of working with turf, to how to lay sod. Cornell Grounds Department collaborated to have the materials on site, and supported the work in numerous ways.

The sofa needs a few days to firm up and dry out. So best to test feel the sod with your hand before testing it out.

Turf specialist Frank Rossi explains the science of growing and installing sod.

Turf specialist Frank Rossi explains the science of growing and installing sod.

Students begin shaping the soil and compost.

Students begin shaping the soil and compost.

Checking out the work in progress.

Checking out the work in progress.

Testing the shape.

Testing the shape.

Muddy gloves.

Muddy gloves.

Rossi demonstrates how to install sod.

Rossi demonstrates how to install sod.

Installing sod.

Installing sod.

 

It's all about the teamwork!

It’s all about the teamwork!

 

 

 

 

 

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dilmun_hill_open_houseFriday, September 5, 3 – 6 p.m.

Tour Dilmun Hill (Cornell’s student-run farm) and MacDaniels Nut Grove (forest farming research and education center), and have some fun while learning about sustainable vegetable production and agroforestry.

Tours of the Grove, will depart from Dilmun at 3:30 and at 4:30 and will include mushrooms taste testing.

Other scheduled activities include:

  • Pumpkin painting
  • T-shirt decorating (bring your own shirt)
  • Lacto-fermented pickling workshop
  • Tomato taste tests
  • And more

Finger foods provided. Bring a dish to pass if inspired.

Contact: Alena Hutchinson amh345@cornell.edu.

Map.

open house poster

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Kondrat and Bond

Kondrat and Bond

“No more pencils, no more books” may have held true for many CALS students this summer, but that didn’t mean they took a vacation from education. Learn more about their stories of the kind of learning that occurs outside of the classroom or lecture hall in this special online only issue of PeriodiCALS.

Among the many familiar faces featured, plant science major Justin Kondrat ’14, who transferred to Cornell when he was already halfway through his undergraduate career. But it didn’t take long for him to become firmly rooted here on the Hill. By his final semester, Kondrat’s feelings were manifested in flowery, ten-foot tall letters on Libe Slope that spelled out “ROOTED.” The purpose? To get students with diverse backgrounds to reflect upon what keeps them rooted at Cornell.

And two years at Cornell weren’t enough for plant science major Mathew Bond. Having transferred from SUNY Potsdam in his junior year, Bond wanted to squeeze in as much time here as possible before heading off to the University of Hawaii to pursue a doctoral degree in ethnobotany. Inspired by the Plant Pathology class that he took with plant pathology professor Bill Fry PhD ‘70, Bond spent most of his summer studying potato and tomato late blight in Fry’s lab.

Jennison

Jennison

Also plant science major Celine Jennison ’14. Amidst our “throwaway culture,” standing up for sustainability—well, stand-up paddleboarding, that is. she and her teammates Christian Shaw ‘14, Gordon Middleton ‘14, and Julian Rodriguez set out on a 10-day paddleboarding expedition around the waters of Bermuda in order to increase awareness of plastic pollution in the world’s oceans.

Read their full stories (and more) in this epic issue of periodiCALS.

 

 

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Belize studentsDo you love chocolate?

Are you curious about the world around you?

Belizean Tropical Plants Extravaganza

  • Field trip to Belize during January break
  • Class meets weekly for 1st half of spring semester
  • 1 credit

You will:

  • Immerse yourself in tropical plants.
  • Learn from an intensive team building experience.
  • Assist in preparing tropical edibles.
  • Help implement interpretation for a natural park.
  • Collaborate with other students, project leaders and mentors.

Info session Sept. 15, 4:45pm
Room 22, Plant Science Building

For more information contact: Marcia Eames-Sheavly, ME14@cornell.edu

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Hortus Forum, Cornell’s undergraduate horticulture club, will have a plant sale on the perennial pad by the green greenhouse complex at Kenneth Post Lab 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. on Monday August 11. Offerings include:

  • Astilbe
  • Peony
  • Sedum
  • Hosta
  • Hemerocallis
  • Eupatorium
  • Eucomis
  • And more

Prices: $5 per pot/$20 per five pots

Details and pictures on Hortus Forum Facebook page.

find the plant in you hofo poster

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Hortus Forum, Cornell’s undergraduate horticulture club, will  have a plant sale on the perennial pad by the green greenhouse complex at Kenneth Post Lab 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. on Wednesday August 6.  

All 1-gallon pots will be $5 or 5 for $20. All 2-gallon bleeding hearts and peonies will be $10.

find the plant in you hofo poster

 

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David Harris, Chrystal Stewart and Fred Gouker

David Harris, Chrystal Stewart and Fred Gouker

Some recent awards and recognitions:

Crystal Stewart, Cornell Cooperative Extension Regional Agriculture Specialist with the Eastern NY Commercial Horticulture Program, was awarded an Achievement Award at the Annual Meeting of the National Association of County Agricultural Agents (NACAA) held in Mobile, Alabama on July 22. The Achievement Award is presented to those agricultural agents that have been working in their field for less than 10 years but in that short time have made significant contributions to their profession.

Fred Gouker, PhD candidate in the Graduate Field of Plant Breeding and Genetics and member of Larry Smart’s lab was a co-winner of the Best Student Poster at the International Poplar and Willow Symposium VI July 21-23 in Vancouver, BC for his paper entitled Analysis of phenotypic and genetic diversity of a Salix purpurea association mapping population.

David Harris, a rising senior majoring in Plant Science with a minor in East Asian Studies received the Long Island Flower Growers Association (LIFGA) Scholarship. Harris’s career goal is to work for an international company that plans on expanding production or sales into Asia.

Update [2014-08-02] from Marvin Pritts: At the American Society for Horticultural Science meetings in Orlando this week, Terence Robinson received the Outstanding Extension Educator Award and Bill Miller delivered the B.Y. Morrison lecture. Also, Mary Meyer, Department of Horticultural Science, University of Minnesota (M.S. Cornell, 73), delivered the presidential address.

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