Archive for the “Undergrad” Category

From Leah Cynara Cook, Plant Sciences Undergraduate Program Coordinator:

On Monday, May 18, the School of Integrative Plant Science held its annual luncheon to honor graduating seniors in Plant Sciences and recipients of two awards given out through the  Horticulture Section to outstanding Plant Sciences students.

Students were joined by Director of Undergraduate Studies Mike Scanlon, Horticulture Section Chair Marvin Pritts, and  Plant Sciences Undergraduate Program Coordinator Leah Cook.

Congratulations graduating plant science majors

Above from the left: Mike Scanlon, Liana Acevedo-Siaca, Princess Swan, Katharine Constas, Jeremy Pardo, Marvin Pritts, Leah Cook. Not pictured: Michael Gandler.

 

Jeremy Pardo, Marvin Pritts, Katharin Constas.

Above: Horticulture Section chair Marvin Pritts congratulates Jeremy Pardo (left), who received the 2015 H.R. Schenkel Sr. Memorial Fund Award, which recognizes superior academic achievement by a sophomore or junior enrolled at Cornell University who specializes in horticulture, and Katharine Constas (right), who received the 2015 Kenneth Post Award, which is given annually by the Kenneth Post Foundation to an outstanding senior in horticulture and plant sciences. The award emphasizes academic achievement, but also considers character, leadership, participation in university activities, and promise of continued success in horticulture.

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USDA news release [2015-05-11]

Nearly 60,000 High-Skilled Agriculture Job Openings Expected Annually in U.S., Yet Only 35,000 Graduates Available to Fill Them

WASHINGTON, May 11, 2015 – Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack today announced a new report showing tremendous demand for recent college graduates with a degree in agricultural programs with an estimated 57,900 high-skilled job openings annually in the food, agriculture, renewable natural resources, and environment fields in the United States. According to an employment outlook report released today by USDA’s National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) and Purdue University, there is an average of 35,400 new U.S. graduates with a bachelor’s degree or higher in agriculture related fields, 22,500 short of the jobs available annually.

“There is incredible opportunity for highly-skilled jobs in agriculture,” said Secretary Vilsack. “Those receiving degrees in agricultural fields can expect to have ample career opportunities. Not only will those who study agriculture be likely to get well-paying jobs upon graduation, they will also have the satisfaction of working in a field that addresses some of the world’s most pressing challenges. These jobs will only become more important as we continue to develop solutions to feed more than 9 billion people by 2050.”

The report projects almost half of the job opportunities will be in management and business. Another 27 percent will be in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) areas. Jobs in food and biomaterials production will make up 15 percent, and 12 percent of the openings will be in education, communication, and governmental services. The report also shows that women make up more than half of the food, agriculture, renewable natural resources, and environment higher education graduates in the United States.

Read the whole release.

Students in Principles of Vegetable Production class (HORT 3500) learn the ins and outs of more than a dozen tillage, planting and cultivation implements at the Homer C. Thompson Vegetable Research Farm in Freeville, N.Y.

Students in Principles of Vegetable Production class (HORT 3500) learn the ins and outs of more than a dozen tillage, planting and cultivation implements at the Homer C. Thompson Vegetable Research Farm in Freeville, N.Y.

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Cornell Chronicle [2015-05-13]:

Eames-Sheavly

Eames-Sheavly

As a student, Marcia Eames-Sheavly ’83 enjoyed spending time in a Department of Floriculture and Ornamental Horticulture studio above Mann Library, creating botanical paintings with watercolors. Now, as a senior lecturer and senior extension associate in the Horticulture Section, she is sharing her passion.

A prolific artist, with a personal show of her work that opened May 4 at the Cornell Plantations Nevin Welcome Center, Eames-Sheavly teaches the Art of Horticulture and Advanced Botanical Illustration on campus, and three online courses in botanical illustration through Cornell Cooperative Extension.

She believes that teaching these courses is “carrying on a tradition” of art in horticulture, she said.

In any age, but especially in the modern era of technological distractions, “any form of drawing connects you to your world,” she said. “People in my classes often say they are starting to observe their world again, or even, see for the first time.”

Read the whole article/view slideshow.

Venna Wang's capstone display

Biological Science major Venna Wang ’15 took took Eames-Sheavly’s advanced botanical illustration class in 2014 and fell in love with the natural world. View the capstone project she completed for the Minor in Horticulture with a focus in Botanical Art in the display case just west of the first-floor foyer in Plant Science Building.

 

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From the managers at Dilmun Hill, Cornell’s student-run farm:

CSA stands for Community Supported Agriculture, a business system that allows farmers and eaters to build a local food system based on trust, shared goals, and common values.

Our CSA members receive a share of the harvest. We provide organic produce, grown right on campus, and together with our members we share a commitment to the land, local economies, and environmental and agricultural education.

Our Summer CSA runs for 10 weeks, from June 21-August 30th.

For more information, or to sign up, please visit our blog or contact the farm managers at dilmunmanagers@gmail.com.

famshare poster

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Yoshi Harada, not afraid of getting dirty TA'ing Urban Eden course.

Yoshi Harada, not afraid of getting dirty TA’ing Urban Eden course.

Via CALS Notes: Top TAs honored for excellence by CALS faculty and leadership

Many arrive at class early, stay late, answer questions before they can be asked and jump in to lecture at times when a professor’s research pulls her away from her students. Some tackle field research in Asia, outreach in Africa or biochemistry tutoring at midnight in Roberts Hall.

But all 29 of this year’s Outstanding Teaching Assistants honorees have at least one thing in common – the deep respect and gratitude of the more than two dozen faculty members and college leaders on hand in G10 Biotech on Thursday to offer their thanks.

“TAs definitely make a significant contribution to our teaching mission in the college, and we want to recognize that. You make a huge impact on the students you interact with,” said Donald Viands, associate dean and director of academic programs for CALS. “We’re here to celebrate the positive things that you all have done.”

Read the whole article.

Two students in the Graduate Field of Horticulture were recognized:

  • Yoshiki Harada for his work in Urban Eden: Woody Plant Selection, Design, and Landscape Establishment (HORT/LA 4910/4920).
  • Grant Thompson, who TA’d Jeff Perry’s EDUC 2410, The Art of Teaching.

Congratulations Yoshi and Grant!

 

 Donald Viands, associate dean and director of academic programs for CALS, presents award to Grant Thompson.


Donald Viands, associate dean and director of academic programs for CALS, presents award to Grant Thompson.

 Donald Viands, associate dean and director of academic programs for CALS, presents award to Yoshiki Harada.


Donald Viands, associate dean and director of academic programs for CALS, presents award to Yoshiki Harada.

Other recent recognitions include:

  • Two undergraduate Plant Sciences Majors — Sarah Nechamen and Emily Rodekohr were recognized for academic excellence at last month’s Dean’s Awards.
  •  Plant Sciences major Joshua Kaste, ALS ’16, received honorable mention in the Goldwater Scholarship competition.
  • And speaking of runners-up, Cornell rose to #2 in the  QS World University Rankings by Subject among the world’s elite universities in the Agriculture and Forestry category.

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Urban Eden students replanting the Deans Garden.

Urban Eden students replanting the Deans Garden.

This spring, students in Creating the Urban Eden: Woody Plant Selection, Design, and Landscape Establishment (HORT/LA 4910/4920) planted the entire perimeter of Warren Hall – from the front door around the building to the Centennial Garden – with a selection plants matched to the variety of growing conditions found in different locations.

“It was by far the largest class planting project we’ve ever taken on,” says Nina Bassuk, professor in the Horticulture Section of the School of Integrative Plant Science, who co-teaches the course with Peter Trowbridge, landscape architecture professor. Bassuk is also director of Cornell’s Urban Horticulture Institute.

In all, students planted and mulched more than 1,900 trees, shrubs, ferns, ornamental grasses and other plants. They planted around existing specimen plants, such as the mature Japanese maple in the Deans Garden, that were protected during the Warren Hall renovation.

Students in the two-semester course also got hands-on experience last fall when they planted the runoff-filtering bioswale along Tower Road.

Deans Garden from above.

Deans Garden from above.

A quick tour of the Warren plantings, starting at the front door …

Warren Hall plantings

Warren Hall plantings

Warren Hall plantings

Warren Hall plantings

Warren Hall plantings

Warren Hall plantings

Warren Hall plantings

IMG_4946

 

 

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Flowers brighten study area on the 2nd floor of Mann Library.

Flowers brighten study area on the 2nd floor of Mann Library.

Via Mann Library News [2015-05-04]:

The cupped blossoms you’ll likely have recognized–tulips! The exotic about-to-bloom bromeliads maybe not.  Both are part of the gorgeous color and greenery sprouting in various corners of Mann Library, as the Library’s plant collection has come under the care and supervision of one of the oldest student organizations on the Cornell campus, Hortus Forum.

Hortus Forum has long been known for their amazing weekly plant sales on the Ag Quad–in the Mann Library lobby during the winter, outside under the Ag Quad trees during warmer weather. If you’ve ever shopped at their table, you’ll likely have gotten a dose of excellent advice about proper plant care with your purchase. Earlier this year, Hortus Forum  agreed to apply their group’s expertise to the enhancement of the plant collection within the Mann Library building as well.

Read the whole article.

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field day flyer

Come join us at Dilmun Hill Student Farm for a day of sun and fun!

Festivities include:

1pm – 3pm: Farming – get your hands dirty building beds, sow and plant. Wear closed-toe shoes.

3pm – 5pm: Fun and Food

  • Plant your own seeds
  • Create seed-filled Mother’s Day Cards
  • Make seed bombs
  • Music
  • Food

Directions.

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Nina Bassuk, founder of Cornell University’s Urban Horticulture Institute, was awarded the 2015 Frederick Law Olmsted Award from the Arbor Day Foundation.  (See April 6 post.) Bassuk is a professor in the Horticulture Section of Cornell’s School of Integrative Plant Science (SIPS).

While Nina couldn’t be there in person to accept the award, the Foundation did profile her in this video:

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group shot

24 graduate students, undergrads, faculty, staff and family members visited The Niagara Parks School of Horticulture, Niagara Falls, Ontario, and Highland Park in Rochester, N.Y., during a field trip Sunday sponsored by Pi Alpha Xi, the horticulture honor society.

“The early spring flowers and the butterflies in the Butterfly Conservatory were lovely,” says Ed Cobb, research support specialist in the Plant Biology Section. “But the real highlight was seeing the magnificent mature trees.”

View more images on the Pi Alpha Xi Facebook page.

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