Tag Archives: bees

Color, Color Everywhere – or maybe not!

By Brooke Moore, New Windsor, Senior Master Gardener Volunteer

This article appeared in the September 2019 Issue of Gardening in Orange County. Click here to subscribe!

We live in a colorful world filled with plants, animals, and objects that are brightly colored or, in some cases, patterned, or even singular in color.  As humans we often think that the rest of the world sees itself and its surroundings in the same way that we do. But nothing could be further than the truth.

A cirlce filled with dots of varying sizes all in arying shade of red except for the green dots, of varying shades, that form a large 'W' spaning the width of the circle.
An Ishihar plate, used by optometrists and ophthalmologists to test for color blindness.
As a teenager I had a wonderful friend, John, who was the first person I knew who was colorblind.  Not just color insensitive, as many are, but truly and completely unable to perceive any color at all.  His experience of the world was totally opposite to mine, as I am one of the lucky or in some ways unlucky people who perceive way more color than most people do.  His daily view of things was more like that of a rabbit, who see in shades of darkness and light and contrast.

Close up of a blue human eye.
Human eye

Learning more about how he saw the world and experienced paintings, gardens and simple things like traffic lights began my interest in color and how we can manipulate our surroundings based on adding or subtracting colors from a situation.

Close-uo of the head of a fly - white head, lots of black hairs and large red eyes in which you can see teh individaul lenses
Fly eye

The animals who live among us and in our gardens perceive color in many different ways, and they interact with the plants we grow depending on what they see and how they see and interpret light.

All eyes use reflected light to create images that are the basis of sight.  As humans, we have sight that can determine the shape, size and special relationship of objects, and we have sight that is color-based.

Close up of an owl eye - bright yellow eye surrounded by white, brown and black plummage
Owl eye

The same is true for animals.  Birds have keen color sight that helps them with foraging for food, identifying prey and recognizing others of their species.  Many scientists have been astonished to discover that some birds may not be able to see all the colors of their own plumage, while other birds can see more than enough colors to find and attract a mate.

Bird Vision
A graph with absorbance on the y-axis (0-1.0) and wave length (330 nm - 700 nm) on the x-axis. There are four lines on the graph, all of them bell shape-esque. The grey line peaks at 370 nm, which falls in the ultraviolet range. The blue line peaks at 445 nm, which falls in the blue range of the visble light spectrum. The green line peaks at 508 nm, which falls in the green range of the visible light spectrum. The red line peaks at 565 nm, which falls in the yellow/orange range of the visible light spectrum.
Humans usually have three types of cones allowing them to perceive light in the visible spectrum.  Some animals , including birds, have four types of cones which allows them to see ultraviolet light.

Birds see more colors than humans as they are able to use ultraviolet (UV) light due to having four types of cones in their retinas – in contrast to humans who have three types of cones.  Different species of birds have more or fewer cone cells in their retinas and thus different ability to see colors.  The ability to determine subtle differences in shades of colors is an evolving ability in birds and thought to be something that aids in adapting to change in environment and availability of food sources.

Color Vision
State Types of cone cells Approx. number of colors perceived Carriers
Monochromacy 1 200 Marine mammals, owl monkey, Australian sea lion, achromat primates
Dichromacy 2 40,000 Most terrestrial non-primate mammals, color blind primates
Trichromacy 3 10 million Most primates, especially great apes (such as humans), marsupials, some insects (such as honeybees)
Tetrachromacy 4 100 million Most reptiles, amphibians, birds and insects, rarely humans
Pentachromacy 5 10 billion Some insects (specific species of butterflies), some birds (pigeons for instance)

The UV reflection from the waxy surface of fruits and berries makes them stand out from the green of foliage – and birds are better able to find them.  Red berries are seen  best and will be eaten first, so also growing some plants that produce orange or yellow fruit will extend the feeding season.

Top picture: A sinlge stem with two flower buds and one small yellow flower with four petals. Bottom: The same photo taken in UV light. The flower is now white with a black center.
Winter Jasmine (Jasminum nudiflorum) photographed in visible light (top) and ultraviolet light (bottom).

Many insects also reflect UV light, making them more attractive to birds as a food source.  Certain bird eggs reflect UV light and help birds to identify their own eggs and reject those put in the nest by other birds.  Many flowers have nectar guides  that reflect UV light.  These  marking are visible to bees and butterflies allowing them to easily find the nectar at the center of the flower.

Deer have poor color vision limited to short (blue) and middle (green) wave lengths of color.  They may have some UV sensitivity but not much compared to birds.  Foxes do not see green and have little ability to see blue, red or yellow.  So, these animals are not using color in the garden to find or choose what they eat!

The head of a deer standing with its face brushing up againsta purple flower.Understanding which animals use color to find and choose food can help us in identifying plants to put into our gardens, and plants to leave out.  It also can put to rest myths like deer choosing red tulips over yellow daffodils -because they are making a choice based on taste and smell, not sight.

Native Bees

Which Native Bee Is That?

By Susan I., Sparrowbush Senior Master Gardener

This article appeared in the June 2019 Issue of Gardening in Orange County. Click here to subscribe!

Even though there are almost 400 species of native bees in New York, these bees usually zoom right under our radar.  They work and nest on our property yet are often unrecognized and unnoticed (let alone understood) as the crucial pollinators of our flowers and food crops.  Most natives are not aggressive and sting only if provoked. Unfortunately, they often get mistaken for bellicose wasps or hornets and, sadly, are obliterated.

Bees evolved from insect-devouring wasps 100 million years ago.  Bees are wasps that went vegetarian.  They evolved away from hunting insects to bee species adapted for efficiently gathering more nutritious pollen to feed their larvae.

Three-fourths of our native Orange County bees are ground-nesters that dig tunnels or take over beetle or mouse burrows.  The rest nest above ground in straw-like stems, twigs, stonewalls, or in hollowed-out deadwood.  Most of them are solitary – meaning the queens build, gather, provision, and care for their nests all alone.  Males often look like a smaller version of their queens.

Close up of a bumble bee on an orange flower
Bombus pensylvanicus

BumblebeesBombus

Closely related to foreign honeybees, these charismatic bees have an iconic stocky, round shape and small wings that defy the aerodynamics of lift and drag.  The distinctive flat shiny spot on female’s back legs is surrounded by hairs to form a pollen basket.  They use this basket to transport pollen wetted with nectar, but, unlike the honeybee, they never stockpile it.  Bumblebees live in ground dwellings, not hives, and are distinguishable by their waist-less anatomy covered in black and yellow hair, especially on the abdomen.  Queens make their nests in animal tunnels or tussock grasses.  A queen will travel up to a mile for pollen to feed her young, usually referred to as her brood. The more flowers available for pollen, the larger her brood.  Colonies last only one season – compelling swift, and prodigious pollen collection, 15 times that of the honey bee.  Males leave the nest and do not normally return, spending their time feeding on nectar and trying to mate.

Bumblebees are flower generalists and are the preeminent pollinators of tomatoes.  To do this, they clutch the tomato flower and vibrate their abdomen to shake out the pollen found inside.

Pinned mining bee specimen
Andrena nigrae

Mining Bees

These strong bees dig deep ground-nests leaving volcano-shaped mounds in sand, clay, grass or under fallen leaves.  Often their nests are aggregated and are easily spotted when females are orientating themselves to the “door” of their nest by flying in larger and larger figure eights around it.  Males can also be seen swarming around the complex, but instead of orientating themselves, they are looking for an opportunity to mate.  Although one hole leads to many underground “apartments”, each queen lives separately with her brood. The communities’ females exhibit an orderly morning exodus one at a time.

Our most numerous native bees, miner bees fly only from late April to July. They emerge to the surface at around 40 – 50 °F to absorb the sun’s warming rays, and take of flying when temperatures reach 50 – 60 °F.  They fly fast and are valued for pollinating early morning flowers that bloom before honey bees wake up.

Close-up of a carpenter bee on a wooden fence
Xylocopa virginica

Carpenter BeesXylocopa virginica

Common in Orange County, carpenter bees are the largest of our native bees.  Females resemble bumblebees – only they are larger and have a hairless shiny black abdomen. Males’ faces are yellow while females’ faces are black.  They are named “carpenter bees” because they cut precise round galleries for nests inside sound, undecayed soft wood.  They avoid wood covered with paint or bark and have been known to cut their galleries in fence posts, wooden benches and houses leaving what some would consider unsightly holes and stains.  Males are attracted to sudden movements and conspicuously hover closely to people or in front of nests.  They also engage in aggressive territorial battles for mating opportunities, but fortunately for us males cannot sting. Females can sting, but only do so when molested.  Adults emerge during the summer and fall and can live for up to three years.  Females will sometimes cohabitate with their daughters and, unlike most native bees, carpenter bees will reuse old nests. Carpenter bees are beneficial and important pollinators, especially of open-faced flowers.

Mason bee on board with
Mason bee apartment
Mason Bees

New York’s several species of Mason bees choose above ground nesting sites in preexisting cavities such as twigs, hollow stems, and beetle burrows.  Child and pet-friendly Mason bees are far too busy to be aggressive. They only sting as a last resort, and the venom they release is very mild.  If you’re allergic to honeybees, this solitary, docile pollinating rock star is easy to keep and a great alternative.  They cross-pollinate a wide variety of trees and plants instead of focusing on stripping pollen and nectar from one location.  You can help protect them in winter by leaving standing hollow-stemmed plants.

Close-up of a leaf cutting bee on a yellow flower
Osmia ribifloris

Leaf Cutter Bees

The female leaf cutter bee makes small circular cuts in living or dried leaves or petals.  She curls them up to carry back and line her nest.  Attracting these gentle yet vigorous pollinators requires growing plants with thin-walled leaves, such as roses, hostas, peas, and lilacs.  Because they build their nests near one another and are 15 times more valuable as pollinators than honey bees, they aid farms and gardens where lots of bees are needed. Unlike carpenter bees, solitary leaf cutter bees cause no damage to structures, because they lay their eggs in existing holes.

They are more round, cigar- or submarine-shaped than other bees and carry collected pollen on their abdomen.  Distinguishable from honeybees, they have no brown/yellow stripes on their abdomen.

Close up of a sweat be on a white petal that tuns red at the center of the flower
Agapostemon virscens

Sweat Bees

Sweat bees make up for their minute size with their incredible numbers and are among the most abundant and commonly seen bees in North America.  They are attracted to the proteins, moisture and salt on sweaty arms, legs, and necks.  Don’t swat!  Females will sting if brushed against or agitated, and they will release pheromones attracting more bees.

Up to twenty-four solitary females dig deep burrows in banks or on flat or sloping soil – they then share the entrance into the nest.  They are most active in late spring and summer.  Sweat bees have short tongues which makes it difficult for them to extract nectar from deep flowers.  For this reason, they are attracted to open-face flowers.

FYI – Wasps 

Paper wasp resting on top of its nest
European paper wasp – Polistes dominula

Although wasps are usually considered pests, adult wasps are considered beneficial since they capture insects for their developing larvae.  They also feed on sweet nectar (and can annoy picnics in late summer by scavenging on human food).

yellow jacket feeding on rabbiteye blueberry
Yellow jacket

Some of the more common wasps found in our area are yellow jackets, bald-faced hornets, and paper wasps.  Yellow jackets usually build their nests in the ground or in voids found in buildings.  Their colonies last only one season and nests are not reused.  Bald-faced hornets are actually not true wasps, but a type of yellow jacket.  They are large black and white wasps that make the grayish papery, pear-shaped hives (mistakenly illustrated as Winnie the Pooh’s “honey bee hive”) found hanging from trees or shrubs.  Bald-face hornets also do not reuse their nests.  Like the bald-faced hornets, paper wasps also make papery nests, but their nests have open combs.

Bald-faced hornet nest 20 feet in a Maple tree 9 inches in diameter
Bald-faced hornet nest

Just remember that wasps are considered beneficial, so unless their nests are in an undesirable place, they should be left alone. One way to dissuade wasps from nesting near your home is to use an imitation wasp nest. (These can be crocheted or purchased.)  As visual creatures, when they see another “wasp” nest in the area they assume it’s another competitor and do not build there.

It’s clear that bees are good for our gardens and as long as our gardens provide reliable pollen and nectar sources, our gardens are good for the bees. Unfortunately our native bees are in decline due to loss of habitat, residual pesticides in their food sources, pathogens, mites and diseases.  Our first step in helping them is understanding them and their ways.  Protect their livelihood by proliferating their only food source – flowers – which renew and sustain them year-after year.  Here are a few other things that you can do to help protect the bees:

  • plant flowers in swaths
  • remember that although modified, doubled-petaled cultivars are ascetically pleasing to the eye, they have less nectar than native cultivars of the same flower
  • choose diverse flowers, preferably natives species
  • intersperse decorative flowers among vegetables
  • allow some of your herbs bolt, producing flowers
  • minimize your use of neonicotinoid pesticides which move systemically through the plant into plant pollen and nectar and can weaken bees’ immune systems.

Flower Power!

More flowers = Higher bee numbers!

In the bargain, humans get free pollinating labor assuring healthy vegetation and reliable fresh foods – and we get to revel in Nature’s door-prize of life – the magnificent, ravishing, inestimable flower.

Squash bee resting on a yellow flower petal
Squash bee – Peponapis sp.

For more information about Wild Bees of New York visit Cornell’s Pollinator Website (https://pollinator.cals.cornell.edu/wild-bees-new-york/).