Pest Watch Update: Bagworms!

by Susan Ndiaye, Community Horticulture Educator

It is time to revisit our post on bagworms! Over the weekend, I was notified by the National Phenology Network that bagworm caterpillars will be emerging in our area in the next six days. If you need to treat a tree that has been infested with bagworms in the past, it is important to do so soon after emergence when the caterpillars are small, as treatments are not effective against larger caterpillars.


pinecone like structure hanging on an evergreen tree

Have you ever noticed one of these structures hanging on a Colorado blue spruce or an arborvitae? They kind of look like pine cones, but not exactly. Well, they aren’t pine cones, but silken bags spun and decorated by bagworms (Thyridopteryx ephemeraeform).

Bagworms are moths whose larvae feed on evergreens such as spruce, juniper, pine and arborvitae. The larvae can also feed on deciduous trees such as maple, elm, birch and sycamore. Bagworms defoliate the trees and shrubs they infest. In large numbers, bagworms can cause significant defoliation, which can lead to the death of the plant.

Bagworm Lifecycle

In late spring, bagworm eggs, which overwinter in their mother’s silken bag, hatch and caterpillars emerge. These caterpillars begin to form new silk bags, and as they eat, they cover it with bits of leaves. As the caterpillar grows, it expand its bags. Then in late summer the caterpillar firmly attaches its bag to the plant and pupates.

Adult male bagworm - clear winged moth with furry brown body
Adult male bagworm

Complete metamorphosis from caterpillar to moth takes about four weeks. Adult male bagworms emerge from their bags as clear winged moths and begin to search for a mate. Adult female bagworms are wingless moths and never leave their bags. After mating females produce 500-1000 eggs before dying. Their eggs overwinter inside their mother’s silken bag and the whole cycle begins again.

Management

Because bagworms are protected by their silken bag, management can be tricky. For smaller trees and shrubs the best tactic is to remove and destroy the bags by hand. Unfortunately, this is not possible in all instances, especially on larger trees and shrubs. Insecticides are most effective right after bagworm eggs hatch, when the caterpillars are small.

But how does one know when the eggs are going to hatch? Well, it turns out that there is a “Bagworm Forecast” that you can check in the spring to determine the best time to apply insecticide. The maps provided by this forecast are updated daily and available six days in the future, so you can plan ahead.

For recommendations on pesticides, check out the resources below. And as always, make sure you read and follow all the instructions on the pesticide label including the use of personal protective equipment. The label is the law!

If you need to spray a larger tree, you may need to contact an arborist. Click here to find a certified arborist near you.

Fun Facts

As females don’t fly, you may wonder how bagworms spread. Bagworm caterpillars can balloon, or use their silk threads to catch the wind and travel long distances.

Despite relatively little protection for overwintering bagworm eggs, research at Purdue University found that it takes a 24 hr period at -0.6 ° F or below to kill the eggs. So if you live in Orange County New York don’t expect a cold winter to kill off your bagworms.

Here is a video of a bagworm feeding!

Video from Purdue University Landscape Report (https://www.purduelandscapereport.org/article/824/)

Resources

Bagworm – Penn State University

Bagworms – Cornell University

Bagworm Forecast – USA National Phenology Network

Bagworms on Landscape Plants – University of Kentucky

Cold weather in January 2018 may have killed bagworms in some parts of Indiana – Landscape Report, Purdue University

Upcoming Events: Online Gardening Classes

Looking for an online gardening class?

Check out these classes being offered by Cornell Cooperative Extensions around the state.

Click on the topic to see what classes are being offered.

Container Gardening

A short wooden tub set next to a tree overflowing with plants: a tall grass with red leaves, a bright green plant with white veins and a dark purple plant spilling over the edge.Creative Container Gardening

Wednesday, May 27, 2020
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Tompkins County

Back to the Top

Composting

Full Wooden Compost BinComposting

Monday, May 18, 2020
4:00 PM – 5:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Onondaga County

Two hands holding finished compostBuilding Soil and Composting

Tuesday, May 19, 2020
5:00 PM – 6:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Chenango County

Back to the Top

Fruit

Two small light green fruits (pawpaws) growing of a branchGrowing Unusual Fruits

Wednesday, May 20, 2020
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Tompkins County

Back to the Top

Herb Gardening

Bright Green Herb Plants - Chives, Basil, ParsleyGrowing Culinary HerbsSOLD OUT!!

Wednesday, May 20, 2020
6:30 pm
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Broome County

Back to the Top

Insects

Close-up of a leaf cutting bee on a yellow flowerPollinator Gardens

Monday, May 18, 2020
1:00 PM – 2:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extensions
Jefferson County

Yellow beetle with black spotsPest and Disease Management

Tuesday, May 26, 2020
5:00 PM – 6:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Chenango County

Swallow Tail Butterfly, yellow and black, feed ing off pink flowersCreating a Butterfly GardenSOLD OUT!

Monday, May 27, 2020
6:30 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extensions
Broome County

Green lacewing - green bodied bug with large net-like wings sitting on a flower with pink petals and a yellow centerAll About Bugs: pollinators and more!

Thursday, May 28, 2020
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Warren County

Squash bug adult laying eggsGarden Pests

Thursday, May 28, 2020
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Madison County

Back to the Top

Pest Management

A hand how and a gloved hand pulling weedsWeed Identification and Management SOLD OUT!

Tuesday, May 19, 2020
6:30 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Broome County

A pair of gloved hands holding some freshly picked weedsGarden Weeds

Thursday, May 21, 2020
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Madison County

Yellow beetle with black spotsPest and Disease Management

Tuesday, May 26, 2020
5:00 PM – 6:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Chenango County

Squash bug adult laying eggsGarden Pests

Thursday, May 28, 2020
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Madison County

Back to the Top

Pollinators

Close-up of a leaf cutting bee on a yellow flowerPollinator Gardens

Monday, May 18, 2020
1:00 PM – 2:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extensions
Jefferson County

Swallow Tail Butterfly, yellow and black, feed ing off pink flowersCreating a Butterfly GardenSOLD OUT!

Monday, May 27, 2020
6:30 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extensions
Broome County

Back to the Top

Soil

Two hands holding finished compostBuilding Soil and Composting

Tuesday, May 19, 2020
5:00 PM – 6:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Chenango County

Back to the Top

Technology as a Gardening Tool

Taking a picture of a field of flowers with a smart phoneUsing Your Cell Phone as a Gardening Tool

Wednesday, May 20, 2020
6:30 PM – 8:30 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Orange County

Back to the Top

Vegetable Gardening

A vegetable garden with a combination of cabbage surrounded by small yellow and orange flowers and dark purple leafy greensCaring for Your Vegetable Garden

Monday, May 18, 2020
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Chemung County

A cluster of cherry tomatoes growing on a tomato plant wet with the morning dew.Family Food Gardens for Beginners

Thursday, May 21, 2020
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Warren County

Pile of cucumbers, a red, yellow and green pepper, green onions, tomatoes, a bunch of parsley and a sprig of rosemaryHow Does Your Garden Grow Check-In

Thursday, June 11, 2020
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Madison County

Back to the Top

Weeds

A hand how and a gloved hand pulling weedsWeed Identification and ManagementSOLD OUT!

Tuesday, May 19, 2020
6:30 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Broome County

A pair of gloved hands holding some freshly picked weedsGarden Weeds

Thursday, May 21, 2020
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Madison County

Back to the Top

Upcoming Events: Online Gardening Classes

Looking for an online gardening class?

Check out these classes being offered by Cornell Cooperative Extensions around the state.

Click on the topic to see what classes are being offered.

Container Gardening

 Large green pot with a plant with pink flowere, a short plant with white flowers and a varigated plant spilling over the sideContainer Gardening

Monday, May 11, 2020
4:00 PM – 5:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Onondaga County

A short wooden tub set next to a tree overflowing with plants: a tall grass with red leaves, a bright green plant with white veins and a dark purple plant spilling over the edge.Creative Container Gardening

Wednesday, May 13, 2020
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Tompkins County

A small child in a jean shirt, teal skirt and bright yellow rain boots put seeds in the groundSeed Starting and Container Gardening with Kids

Thursday, May 14, 2020
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Warren County

A short wooden tub set next to a tree overflowing with plants: a tall grass with red leaves, a bright green plant with white veins and a dark purple plant spilling over the edge.Creative Container Gardening

Wednesday, May 27, 2020
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Tompkins County

Back to the Top

Composting

Pile of kitchen scraps, mostly peels of various fruits and vegetables, spead out on top of a compost pileHome Composting

Monday, May 11, 2020
1:00 PM – 2:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Jefferson County

Full Wooden Compost BinComposting

Monday, May 18, 2020
4:00 PM – 5:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Onondaga County

Two hands holding finished compostBuilding Soil and Composting

Tuesday, May 19, 2020
5:00 PM – 6:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Chenango County

Back to the Top

Fruit

Quince Tree with two large green quince fruit - almost apple like in shapeFruit 102: Growing Unusual Fruits: An Introduction to Unfamiliar Fruits

Monday, May 11, 2020
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Steuben County

Two small light green fruits (pawpaws) growing of a branchGrowing Unusual Fruits

Wednesday, May 20, 2020
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Tompkins County

Back to the Top

Gardening with Kids

A small child in a jean shirt, teal skirt and bright yellow rain boots put seeds in the groundSeed Starting and Container Gardening with Kids

Thursday, May 14, 2020
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Warren County

Back to the Top

Herb Gardening

Bright Green Herb Plants - Chives, Basil, ParsleyGrowing Culinary Herbs

Wednesday, May 20, 2020
6:30 pm
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Broome County

Back to the Top

Insects

Spotted Lanternfly adult on a green stemSpotted Lanternfly Workshop

Wednesday, May 13, 2020
9:30 AM – 12:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Ulster County

Close-up of a leaf cutting bee on a yellow flowerPollinator Gardens

Monday, May 18, 2020
1:00 PM – 2:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extensions
Jefferson County

Yellow beetle with black spotsPest and Disease Management

Tuesday, May 26, 2020
5:00 PM – 6:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Chenango County

Swallow Tail Butterfly, yellow and black, feed ing off pink flowersCreating a Butterfly Garden

Monday, May 27, 2020
6:30 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extensions
Broome County

Green lacewing - green bodied bug with large net-like wings sitting on a flower with pink petals and a yellow centerAll About Bugs: pollinators and more!

Thursday, May 28, 2020
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Warren County

Squash bug adult laying eggsGarden Pests

Thursday, May 28, 2020
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Madison County

Back to the Top

Invasive Species

Spotted Lanternfly adult on a green stemSpotted Lanternfly Workshop

Wednesday, May 13, 2020
9:30 AM – 12:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Ulster County

Back to the Top

Pest Management

A hand how and a gloved hand pulling weedsWeed Identification and Management

Tuesday, May 19, 2020
6:30 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Broome County

A pair of gloved hands holding some freshly picked weedsGarden Weeds

Thursday, May 21, 2020
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Madison County

Yellow beetle with black spotsPest and Disease Management

Tuesday, May 26, 2020
5:00 PM – 6:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Chenango County

Squash bug adult laying eggsGarden Pests

Thursday, May 28, 2020
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Madison County

Back to the Top

Pollinators

Close-up of a leaf cutting bee on a yellow flowerPollinator Gardens

Monday, May 18, 2020
1:00 PM – 2:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extensions
Jefferson County

Swallow Tail Butterfly, yellow and black, feed ing off pink flowersCreating a Butterfly Garden

Monday, May 27, 2020
6:30 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extensions
Broome County

Back to the Top

Soil

Two hands holding finished compostBuilding Soil and Composting

Tuesday, May 19, 2020
5:00 PM – 6:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Chenango County

Back to the Top

Technology as a Gardening Tool

Taking a picture of a field of flowers with a smart phoneUsing Your Cell Phone as a Gardening Tool

Wednesday, May 20, 2020
6:30 PM – 8:30 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Orange County

Back to the Top

Vegetable Gardening

Assortment of heirloom vegetables on a blanket - tomatoes of various sizes, sizes colors and shapes, hote egg plants, a cucumber, a purple pepper, a pile of green beans, a few foot long beansGrowing History: Planning an Heirloom Vegetable Garden

Monday, May 11, 2020
10:00 AM – 11:30 AM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Delaware County

A cucurbit seedling showing the two cotyledons and the first true leaf just starting to unfold.Planting a Vegetable Garden

Monday, May 11, 2020
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Chemung County

Pepper seedlings in tray of biodegradeable potsSeed Starting

Tuesday, May 12, 2020
5:00 PM – 6:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Chenango County

A small child in a jean shirt, teal skirt and bright yellow rain boots put seeds in the groundSeed Starting and Container Gardening with Kids

Thursday, May 14, 2020
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Warren County

A vegetable garden with a combination of cabbage surrounded by small yellow and orange flowers and dark purple leafy greensCaring for Your Vegetable Garden

Monday, May 18, 2020
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Chemung County

A cluster of cherry tomatoes growing on a tomato plant wet with the morning dew.Family Food Gardens for Beginners

Thursday, May 21, 2020
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Warren County

Pile of cucumbers, a red, yellow and green pepper, green onions, tomatoes, a bunch of parsley and a sprig of rosemaryHow Does Your Garden Grow Check-In

Thursday, June 11, 2020
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Madison County

Back to the Top

Weeds

A hand how and a gloved hand pulling weedsWeed Identification and Management

Tuesday, May 19, 2020
6:30 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Broome County

A pair of gloved hands holding some freshly picked weedsGarden Weeds

Thursday, May 21, 2020
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Madison County

Back to the Top

Pest Watch: Emerald Ash Borer

by Susan Ndiaye, Community Horticulture Educator

Close up of an ash tree in which the bark has fallen off leaving a light tan color area
Woodpecker damage on ash tree

Hopefully you’ve spent some time outside enjoying the beautiful spring weather we had last weekend.   Did you noticed any ash trees that look like they have been completely stripped of their bark?  Did you wonder what happened?  Did you think it was a disease, an insect or maybe a deer?  This damaged is actually caused by woodpeckers.  They are searching for emerald ash borer larvae which can be found just below the bark.

Slender shiny emerald green beetle with large black eyes standing on a leaf
Adult emerald ash borer

The emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis) is an shiny emerald-colored jewel beetle.  Native to Asia, it was first discovered in North America near Detroit, Michigan in 2002 (most likely hitching a ride here in solid wood packing materials used in the transportation of goods).

Despite its beauty, the emerald ash borer is an invasive insect and has killed hundreds of millions of ash trees throughout North America.  As of April 2020, it has been found in 35 states and 5 Canadian provinces costing municipalities, property owners, nursery operators and forestry product industries hundreds of millions of dollars.

Emerald Ash Borer Lifecycle as described in the textLifecycle

Emerald ash borers, like all beetles, undergo complete metamorphosis.  Usually in June and July, adult females lay 60-90 eggs on the bark of ash trees (Fraxinus spp.).  The eggs hatch and the larvae bore through the outer bark and begin feeding on the inner bark or phloem of the ash tree.  The larvae feed for several weeks growing to rough 1 to 1.25 inches in length.  The larvae then overwinter in the bark.  In the spring they pupate and finally in May and June emerge as adults and exit their host tree by creating a D-shaped whole in the bark.  The adults feed on the leaves of the ash tree, mate, and females lay eggs starting the cycle over.

Damage

As mentioned before, the larvae of the emerald ash borer feed on the inner bark or phloem of the ash tree.  The phloem is part of the vascular system of the plant and is responsible for transporting the sugars produced by photosynthesis in the leaves to the rest of tree.  Damage to the phloem cuts of the nutrient supply and eventually leads to the death of the tree.

An ashe tree with no leaves inthe canopy but lots of leafy shoots covering the trunk
Dying ash tree

One of the first symptoms produced by an emerald ash borer infestation is a thinning canopy.  With fewer leaves the tree’s ability to produce food through photosynthesis decreases and as a result the tree may produce lots of  shoots that sprout from the roots and trunk.  The leaves on these shoots are often larger than normal as the tree tries to compensate for its loss of photosynthetic capability.   The tree’s canopy will continue to thin eventually leaving the tree bare.

Many people do not notice that the canopy of their ash tree is thinning.  For many people, the first symptom that they notice is the woodpecker damage on the trunk.  At this point the tree is usually heavily infested by emerald ash borer and will soon succumb to the infestation.

Management

The emerald ash borer was first detected in New York State in 2009 over in  Cattaraugus County.   Two years later, in 2011, it was detected here in Orange County.  As of right now the majority of trees in Orange County have been infested by the emerald ash borer and are showing signs of decline or have died.   Once you notice that the canopy of your ash tree is thinning  there has already been extensive damage to the vascular system of the tree and even with treatment there is little chance of recovery.

Deciding whether or not to treat your ash tree is up to you.  The first thing to do is make sure you properly identify your tree.

Once you have properly identified your tree there are three option: cut it, treat it, or leave it.

Cut It

Ash trees that create a potential hazard (i.e. proximity to a building) need to be removed.   If you cannot safely remove the tree yourself,  look for a certified arborist near you at www.treesaregood.org.   Many ash trees are being turned into firewood.  Keep in mind that New York State law prohibits the movement of firewood more than 50 miles (linear distance) from its source, specifically to prevent the accidental movement of invasive species like the emerald ash borer.   Don’t Move Firewood!Dontmovefirewood.org

Treat It

Remember that that if you tree is already showing signs of decline it is probably too late to save it through treatment.

If you decide you want to treat your ash tree(s), it is not just a one time investment.  Most treatments only last one or two years before they wear off leaving the tree susceptible to infestation.  This means trees need to be treated ever couple years since at the moment the emerald ash borer looks like it is here to stay.

There are many insecticides on the market that are labeled for emerald ash borer.  Many of them need to be applied by a certified pesticide applicator.  If you are interested in protecting your ash tree(s) check out  Insecticide Options for Protecting Ash Trees from Emerald Ash Borer for more information.

Leave It

If your ash tree poses no potential hazard, consider leaving it.  Although the emerald ash borer has killed millions of ash trees here in North America, there is hope the identification of “lingering ash” or an ash that stays healthy after nearby trees have overwhelmingly succumbed to the emerald ash borer.  The identification of “lingering ash” could help achieve ash species conservation.   Click here to learn more about how you can become a citizen scientist with the Lingering Ash Search through the Monitoring and Managing Ash Program.Decision Tree integrating long-term conservation perspective: Cut it, Treat it, Leave it, Treat

Fun Facts
Biological Control

Although there are some predatory wasps that feed on emerald ash borers, the two avenues of biological control that have shown potential in being able to help manage populations of emerald ash borer are parasitoid wasps and entomopathogenic fungi.

parasitoid wasp
Parasitoid wasp (Spathius galinae)

Let’s start with the parasitoid wasps.  Three species of parasitoid wasps found in the emerald ash borer’s native range were were considered potential biological control agents.  These parasitoids are natural enemies of the emerald ash borer and have long ovipositors that allow them to drill into the ash trees and lay their eggs on the emerald ash borer larvae.  Once the eggs hatch the wasp larvae consume the emerald ash borer larvae alive.  (Note: In order to get permission to release these parasitoid wasps in the United Stated, it took four or five years of research to make sure that they  were host specific to emerald ash borer and wouldn’t impact any other similar species.)  Of the three species released, two are showing promise, although research is still being done regarding their dispersal, spread, and ability to overwinter.

Onto the entomopathogenic fungus, Beauveria bassiana.  When spores of this fungus come in contact with the emerald ash borer, they germinate and penetrate the cuticle of the insect.  The fungus continues growing inside the insect eventually killing it.  Although research has show that this fungus can kill the emerald ash borer, more research is need to see if it is effective form a biological control out in the field.

Phenology
Two adult emerald ash borers emerging from an ash tree. One one is have way out and the other's head is just visble as in the D-shaped hole it has created.
Two emerging adult emerald ash borers

Many things in nature are governed by the weather, such as the hatching of bagworm eggs and in this case the emergence of emerald ash borer adults.  You can track this year’s emergence using the “Emerald Ash Borer Forecast“.  This forecast is updated daily and available six days in the future.  Emerald ash borer adults are rarely seen.  Once they emerge, they fly up into the canopy to feed on the leaves.  But if you know when they are emerging you can be on the look out and might be lucky enough to find one.

The Oleaceae Family
Olive tree branch with two clusters of olives
Olive tree

The ash tree is a member of the Oleacae Family and researchers have found that the emerald ash borer can also complete its life cycle in another well-known member of the Oleacae family, the olive tree (Olea europaea).  Although this has only been shown in a laboratory project, there is a possibility that the emerald ash borer could become a problem for olive growers.

Another member of the Oleacae family, the white fringetree (Chionanthus virginicus) is also used as a host for the emerald ash borer.  Although when infested some of these trees don’t survive, a recent study found that white fringetrees are likely to withstand attacks by the emerald ash borer.

Resources

Ash Tree Identification – Michigan State University Extension

Distinguishing Ash from other Common Trees – Michigan State University Extension

Emerald Ash Borer Information Network

Emerald Ash Borer Forecast – National Phenology Network

Insecticide Options for Protecting Ash Trees from Emerald Ash Borer

Signs and Symptoms of the Emerald Ash Borer – Michigan State University Extension

Upcoming Events: Online Gardening Classes

Looking for an online gardening class?

Check out these classes being offered by Cornell Cooperative Extensions around the state.

Click on the topic to see what classes are being offered.

Container Gardening

A short wooden tub set next to a tree overflowing with plants: a tall grass with red leaves, a bright green plant with white veins and a dark purple plant spilling over the edge.Creative Container Gardening

Wednesday, May 13, 2020
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Tompkins County

A small child in a jean shirt, teal skirt and bright yellow rain boots put seeds in the groundSeed Starting and Container Gardening with Kids

Thursday, May 14, 2020
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Warren County

A short wooden tub set next to a tree overflowing with plants: a tall grass with red leaves, a bright green plant with white veins and a dark purple plant spilling over the edge.Creative Container Gardening

Wednesday, May 27, 2020
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Tompkins County

Back to the Top

Composting Classes

Full Wooden Compost BinComposting Ins and Outs

Monday, May 4, 2020
10:00 AM – 11:30 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Delaware County

Three large compost bins, one made of wire fencing and two made of palletsComposting

Friday, May 8, 2020
12:00 PM – 12:45 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Schenectady County

Pile of kitchen scraps, mostly peels of various fruits and vegetables, spead out on top of a compost pileHome Composting

Monday, May 11, 2020
1:00 PM – 2:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Jefferson County

Two hands holding finished compostBuilding Soil and Composting

Tuesday, May 19, 2020
5:00 PM – 6:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Chenango County

 

Back to the Top

Edible Landscaping

A vegetable garden with a combination of cabbage surrounded by small yellow and orange flowers and dark purple leafy greensEdible Landscaping

Monday, May 4, 2020
1:00 PM – 2:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Jefferson County

Back to the Top

Fruit

Two ripe red raspberries and an unripe green raspberry growing on a raspberry plantFruit 101: Growing the Big Three!
Raspberries, Strawberries and Blueberries

Monday, May 4, 2020
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Steuben County

Quince Tree with two large green quince fruit - almost apple like in shapeFruit 102: Growing Unusual Fruits: An Introduction to Unfamiliar Fruits

Monday, May 11, 2020
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Steuben County

Two small light green fruits (pawpaws) growing of a branchGrowing Unusual Fruits

Wednesday, May 20, 2020
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Tompkins County

Back to the Top

Gardens of the Hudson Valley

End of a branch of a blooming magnoloa tree with large pink floweresLunch in the Garden Series: Gardens of the Hudson Valley

Wednesday, May 6, 2020
12:00 PM – 12:30 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Rensselaer County

Back to the Top

 Gardening with Kids

A small child in a jean shirt, teal skirt and bright yellow rain boots put seeds in the groundSeed Starting and Container Gardening with Kids

Thursday, May 14, 2020
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Warren County

Back to the Top

Insects

Bumble bee on a pink flowerPlant a Pollinator Paradise

Saturdays, May 2 & 9, 2020
9:30 AM – 11:00 AM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Putnam County

Spotted Lanternfly adult on a green stemSpotted Lanternfly Workshop

Wednesday, May 13, 2020
9:30 AM – 12:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Ulster County

Close-up of a leaf cutting bee on a yellow flowerPollinator Gardens

Monday, May 18, 2020
1:00 PM – 2:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extensions
Jefferson County

Yellow beetle with black spotsPest and Disease Management

Tuesday, May 26, 2020
5:00 PM – 6:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Chenango County

Green lacewing - green bodied bug with large net-like wings sitting on a flower with pink petals and a yellow centerAll About Bugs: pollinators and more!

Thursday, May 28, 2020
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Warren County

Squash bug adult laying eggsGarden Pests

Thursday, May 28, 2020
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Madison County

Back to the Top

Invasive Species

Spotted Lanternfly adult on a green stemSpotted Lanternfly Workshop

Wednesday, May 13, 2020
9:30 AM – 12:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Ulster County

Back to the Top

Native Plants

Small Tree covered with Pink FlowersUsing Native Plants in the Landscape

Tuesday, May 5, 2020
8:30 AM – 12:30 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Nassau County

Back to the Top

No-Till Gardening

Plants sprouting out of straw baleStraw Bale Gardening

Wednesday, May 6, 2020
10:00 AM – 1:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Delaware County

Light purple clover flower against a background of green leavesNo-Till Gardening Techniques

Wednesday, May 6, 2020
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Tompkins County

Back to the Top

Pest Management

A hand how and a gloved hand pulling weedsNatural Weed Control

Monday, May 4, 2020
4:00 PM – 5:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Chemung County

A pair of gloved hands holding some freshly picked weedsGarden Weeds

Thursday, May 21, 2020
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Madison County

Yellow beetle with black spotsPest and Disease Management

Tuesday, May 26, 2020
5:00 PM – 6:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Chenango County

Squash bug adult laying eggsGarden Pests

Thursday, May 28, 2020
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Madison County

Back to the Top

Pollinators

Bumble bee on a pink flowerPlant a Pollinator Paradise

Saturdays, May 2 & 9, 2020
9:30 AM – 11:00 AM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Putnam County

Close-up of a leaf cutting bee on a yellow flowerPollinator Gardens

Monday, May 18, 2020
1:00 PM – 2:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extensions
Jefferson County

Back to the Top

Soil

Plants sprouting out of straw baleStraw Bale Gardening

Wednesday, May 6, 2020
10:00 AM – 1:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Delaware County

A garden trowel stuck in the the soil of a raised garden bedAll the Dirt on Soil

Wednesday, May 6, 2020
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Chemung County

Two hands holding finished compostBuilding Soil and Composting

Tuesday, May 19, 2020
5:00 PM – 6:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Chenango County

Light purple clover flower against a background of green leavesNo-Till Gardening Techniques

Wednesday, May 6, 2020
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Tompkins County

Back to the Top

Technology as a Gardening Tool

Taking a picture of a field of flowers with a smart phoneUsing Your Cell Phone as a Gardening Tool

Wednesday, May 20, 2020
6:30 PM – 8:30 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Orange County

Back to the Top

Ticks

Blacklegged Tick Don’t Get Ticked NY

Tuesday, May 5, 2020
6:00 PM – 7:30 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Schenectady County

Back to the Top

Vegetable Gardening Classes

A hand holding a pencil over a piece of blank papaerPlanning your Garden

Tuesday, May 5, 2020
5:00 PM – 6:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Chenango County

Plants sprouting out of straw baleStraw Bale Gardening

Wednesday, May 6, 2020
10:00 AM – 1:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Delaware County

Wicker basket full of lettuce, tomaotes, peppers, beets, turnips,onions and a sprig of mintVictory Garden 2020

Wednesday, May 6, 2020
6:30 PM – 8:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Tioga County

Light purple clover flower against a background of green leavesNo-Till Gardening Techniques

Wednesday, May 6, 2020
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Tompkins County

Basket over flowing with vegetables - tomatoes, carrots, peppers, broccoliGrowing Vegetables and Small Fruits

Wednesday, May 6, 2020
7:00 PM – 8:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Oneida County

A cucurbit seedling showing the two cotyledons and the first true leaf just starting to unfold.Planting a Vegetable Garden

Monday, May 11, 2020
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Chemung County

Pepper seedlings in tray of biodegradeable potsSeed Starting

Tuesday, May 12, 2020
5:00 PM – 6:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Chenango County

A small child in a jean shirt, teal skirt and bright yellow rain boots put seeds in the groundSeed Starting and Container Gardening with Kids

Thursday, May 14, 2020
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Warren County

A cluster of cherry tomatoes growing on a tomato plant wet with the morning dew.Family Food Gardens for Beginners

Thursday, May 21, 2020
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Warren County

Green lacewing - green bodied bug with large net-like wings sitting on a flower with pink petals and a yellow centerHow Does Your Garden Grow Check-In

Thursday, June 11, 2020
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Madison County

Back to the Top

Weeds

A hand how and a gloved hand pulling weedsNatural Weed Control

Monday, May 4, 2020
4:00 PM – 5:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Chemung County

A pair of gloved hands holding some freshly picked weedsGarden Weeds

Thursday, May 21, 2020
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Madison County

Back to the Top

Upcoming Events: Online Gardening Classes

Looking for an online gardening class?

Check out these classes being offered by Cornell Cooperative Extensions around the state. 

Click on the topic to see what classes are being offered.

Container Gardening

Six heads of large heads of green and red lettuce growing in a raised garden bedGrowing Edibles in Containers

Monday, April 27, 2020
4:00 PM – 5:30 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Broome County

A cluster of cherry tomatoes growing on a tomato plant wet with the morning dew.Crops in Pots – Growing Vegetables in Containers

Monday, April 27, 2020
4:00 PM – 5:30 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Rockland County

A short wooden tub set next to a tree overflowing with plants: a tall grass with red leaves, a bright green plant with white veins and a dark purple plant spilling over the edge.Creative Container Gardening

Wednesday, May 27, 2020
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Tompkins County

Back to the Top

Composting Classes

Two hands holding finished compostMagic Compost

Tuesday, April 28, 2020
10:00 AM – 11:00 AM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Suffolk County

Pile of kitchen scraps, mostly peels of various fruits and vegetables, spead out on top of a compost pileComposting Basics

Wednesday, April 29, 2020
7:00 PM – 8:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Oneida County

Three large compost bins, one made of wire fencing and two made of palletsComposting

Friday, May 8, 2020
12:00 PM – 12:45 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Schenectady County

Full Wooden Compost BinHome Composting

Monday, May 11, 2020
1:00 PM – 2:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Jefferson County

Back to the Top

Cut Flowers

A garden patch of magenta, orange and yellow zinniasGrowing Cut Flowers

Wednesday, April 29, 2020
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Tompkins County

Back to the Top

Edible Landscaping

A vegetable garden with a combination of cabbage surrounded by small yellow and orange flowers and dark purple leafy greensEdible Landscaping

Monday, May 4, 2020
1:00 PM – 2:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Jefferson County

Back to the Top

Fruit

Two small light green fruits (pawpaws) growing of a branchGrowing Unusual Fruits

Wednesday, May 20, 2020
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Tompkins County

Back to the Top

Native Plants

Swamp Milkweed - Lots of small pink flowersNative Plants

Wednesday, April 29, 2020
4:00 PM – 5:30 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Rockland County

Small Tree covered with Pink FlowersUsing Native Plants in the Landscape

Tuesday, May 5, 2020
8:30 AM – 12:30 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Nassau County

Back to the Top

No-Till Gardening

Light purple clover flower against a background of green leavesNo-Till Gardening Techniques

Wednesday, May 6, 2020
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Tompkins County

Back to the Top

Pest Management

Yellow beetle with black spotsGarden Pest and Disease Management

Tuesday, April 28, 2020
5:00 PM – 6:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Lewis County

Back to the Top

Pollinators

A butterfly on a pink zinniaAttracting Pollinators to Your Garden

Tuesday, April 28, 2020
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Schenectady County

Bumble bee on a pink flowerPlant a Pollinator Paradise

Saturdays, May 2 & 9, 2020
9:30 AM – 11:00 AM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Putnam County

Close-up of a leaf cutting bee on a yellow flowerPollinator Gardens

Monday, May 18, 2020
1:00 PM – 2:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Jefferson County

Back to the Top

Pruning

Turquoise handled pruning shears surrounded by flower petalsPruning Shrubs

Monday, April 27, 2020
6:30 PM – 7:30 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Tompkins County

Back to the Top

Soil

A garden trowel stuck in the the soil of a raised garden bedAll the Dirt on Soil

Wednesday, May 6, 2020
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Chemung County

Light purple clover flower against a background of green leavesNo-Till Gardening Techniques

Wednesday, May 6, 2020
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Tompkins County

Back to the Top

Ticks

Blacklegged Tick Don’t Get Ticked NY

Tuesday, May 5, 2020
6:00 PM – 7:30 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Schenectady County

Back to the Top

Vegetable Gardening Classes

Six heads of large heads of green and red lettuce growing in a raised garden bedGrowing Edibles in Containers

Monday, April 27, 2020
4:00 PM – 5:30 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Broome County

A cluster of cherry tomatoes growing on a tomato plant wet with the morning dew.Crops in Pots – Growing Vegetables in Containers

Monday, April 27, 2020
4:00 PM – 5:30 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Rockland County

A hand holding bunch of freshly picked radishes Three Steps to a Successful Vegetable Garden

Wednesday, April 29, 2020
2:00 PM – 2:30 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Chemung County

Pile of cucumbers, a red, yellow and green pepper, green onions, tomatoes, a bunch of parsley and a sprig of rosemaryVegetable Gardening

Friday, May 1, 2020
12:00 PM – 1:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Schenectady County

Wicker basket full of lettuce, tomatoes, peppers, beets, turnips,onions and a sprig of mintVegetable Gardening 101

Saturday, May 2, 2020
10:00 AM – 12:30 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Tompkins County

Light purple clover flower against a background of green leavesNo-Till Gardening Techniques

Wednesday, May 6, 2020
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Tompkins County

Basket over flowing with vegetables - tomatoes, carrots, peppers, broccoliGrowing Vegetables and Small Fruits

Wednesday, May 6, 2020
7:00 PM – 8:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Oneida County

A cucurbit seedling showing the two cotyledons and the first true leaf just starting to unfold.Planting a Vegetable Garden

Monday, May 11, 2020
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Chemung County

Back to the Top

Wildlife Management

A baby deer (fawn) munching on a clover in a lawnWildlife Management

Thursday, April 30, 2020
4:00 PM – 5:30 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Rockland County

Back to the Top

What’s in Bloom? – April 2020

Even though most of the trees are still bare and must of us awoke to snow on the ground this weekend, spring has arrived and with it are some of the most beautiful blooms of the year.

Spring Flowering Bulbs

Pink and purple hyacinth flowers
Hyacinthus orientalis
Clump of white daffodils with bright orange centers and yellow daffodils
Daffodils (Narcissus spp.)

The crocuses have all but faded, but the daffodils continue to bloom, brightening up the drab landscape with their cheery yellows and oranges.   They have recently been joined by the hyacinths.  With their overpowering fragrance, these flowers add to springs color palette with their cool colors of pink and purple.

Grape Hyacinth - cones of tightly packed purple flowers

You may have noticed some small purple flowers known as grape hyacinths.   Not a true hyacinth,  the inflorescence of this flower is a cone of small purple flowers that almost looks like a miniature clump of grapes.

White daffodiles with bright yellow center
Daffodil ‘Ice Follies‘

If you want to bring some spring cheer inside (highly recommended), it is best to give daffodils their own vase as their stems secrete a substance that is harmful to other flowers.

 

Spring Ephemerals

White and purple flowers growing out of a patch of soil
A mixture of the white spring ephemeral bloodroot (Sanguinaria canadensis) and the purple spring bulb green anemone (Anemone blanda).
Clump of small flowers with five purple petals a light yellow center
Hepatica nobilis

One of the great joys of spring is the appearance of spring ephemerals.  These native plants grow in wooded areas and only have a short time to flower before the trees above them leaf out and block their sunlight.  When you are walking through wooded areas in the spring, make sure you watch your feet or might step on the delicate flowers of the bloodroot or the hepatica.

Other Spring Blooms

Clusters of cascading pink flowers
Andromeda (Pieris japonica)
Small purple and magenta flowers in a mass of green leaves with white spots
Lungwort (Pulmaria spp.)

From the showy flowers of the andromeda bush to the subtle flowers of the lungwort, the more time you spend out side the more flowers you’ll notice.

Weeds – It’s all in the eye of the beholder.

Dandelion with a bright yellow flower growing in the crack between two pavers
Dandelion (Taraxacum officinale)

Many spring flowering plants are considered weeds.  You may think that dandelion in your lawn is unsightly, but the bees beg to differ.  Dandelions are an important source of pollen and nectar for bees in the early spring as are other spring flowering ‘weeds’ like purple deadnettle and henbit.

What about Fungus?

Bright orange sphere with orange tentecales attached to the needles of an evergreen tree
Cedar-Apple Rust Gall (Gymnosporangium juniperi-virginianae)

Now fungi aren’t plants, so they don’t have flowers, but they can add color to the landscape.  In the spring cedar-apple rust galls that overwintered on juniper become more noticeable as they produce gelatinous tendrils that release spores  into the air.  Some of these spores will find their way to apple trees where they can cause problems by infecting the leaves and the fruit of the tree.


Happy Spring!

Spring bouquet of bright yellow daffodils and forsythia, purple grape hyacunth, white andromeda, and buds of a pink cherry treeThanks to all of the Master Gardener Volunteers who provided their thoughts and photos for this post!

Need a Spot to Garden? Join a Community Garden!

by Keith Riddick, Middletown Master Gardener Volunteer

Just Plant It, NY! Food Gardeing for all. Boost Morale & Food Supply with a Garden! gardening.cals.cornell.edu / Cornell Garden Based Learning Logo / Master Gardener Cornell Cooperative Extesnion LogoWith all the uncertainty in the world right now, many people have turned to gardening as a  way of growing their own food as  well as a way to cope with stress and anxiety.   This isn’t the first time that people have turned to gardening during a time of societal upheaval.  Most of us weren’t around, but many families started their own gardens during World War II.  Back then, they were called Victory Gardens.  Food and money were short during the war years, and fresh fruits and vegetables were sometimes hard to come by.   Victory gardens gave people more control over their access to fresh produce and allowed more food to be sent to the troops that were keeping our country free.

A garden trowel stuck in the the soil of a raised garden bedWait! Isn’t gardening a lot of work? It can be, but doesn’t have to be. If you are starting a garden from scratch, it will involve work to prepare the soil (removing sod, large rocks and testing the soil for fertility).  However, if you want a garden bed already prepared for you, consider renting a garden bed at a local community garden.  There are several community gardens located throughout the Orange County with raised beds full of soil and ready for planting.  Chances are there is one not too far from where you live!  There is a short list of community gardens at the end of this article, but there are many more located throughout the county.

During this time, community gardens are taking precautions that allow members to safely grow food.   Although community gardens usually have communal garden tools, at the moment, you should bring your own tools.  Other considerations include limiting the number of people in the garden at one time and finding safe ways to water your garden plot with the communal water source.  When you join a community garden, make sure you are aware of and follow all the rules set in place to keep you and your fellow gardeners safe.

Another perk of community gardens are community plots, like an herb garden, for all to share.  Many also have compost bins for recycling organic material like vines, stems and leaves leftover after you have harvested the edible part of a plant.  This debris decomposes and is then returned to the garden beds as a type of fertilizer.

Pile of cucumbers, a red, yellow and green pepper, green onions, tomatoes, a bunch of parsley and a sprig of rosemaryMaybe a community garden isn’t right for you at this time and you don’t have any space in your yard either.  In that case, you can grow vegetables in containers.  Whether you put them on your patio, your deck, or even your balcony, as long as the plants get enough sun and water you should have a bountiful harvest.  You just can’t beat the terrific taste of fresh produce picked straight from the garden, so grow a garden this summer!

Community Gardens in Orange County New York

Blooming Grove Community Garden

Location: 6 Old Dominion Road
Blooming Grove, NY 10914

Cost: $25 per plot

Contact: Joseph Sciortino
(845) 774-9993
jsciortino49@gmail.com

Middletown Community Garden

Location: David Moore Heights Apartment Complex (off of Genung Street)

Cost: $20 for 4 ft x 16 ft plot
$10 for residents of David More Heights or Summitfield)

Contact: Jackie Hale
(845) 343-1168
jackie@middletownhousing.org

Montgomery CAC Community Garden

Location: Benedict Park
Rte 17K
(one mile west of the village of Montgomery, NY)

Cost: $25 for 20 ft x 20 ft plot

Contact: Richard Phelps
rlphelps@frontiernet.net

Newburgh Armory Unity Center Community Garden

Location: Newburgh Armory Unity Center
321 South William Street
Newburgh, NY 12550

Cost: $20 for 4 ft x 10 ft plot
$40 for 4 ft x 40 ft plot

Contact: Lisa Rittweger
(845) 978-8845
lrittweger@newburgharmory.org

Warwick Community Garden and Orchard

Location: Warwick Valley Community Center
11 Hamilton Avenue
Warwick, NY 10990

Cost: $35 per year (includes garden and orchard)
There are no individual plots.  All members work together to plant, maintain, and harvest the entire garden.

Contact: Kelly Collins
(845) 978-8845
colli642@gmail.com

 

 

Upcoming Events: Online Gardening Workshops

Looking for some online gardening classes?  Here are some being offered by Cornell Cooperative Extensions around the state.


A baby deer (fawn) munching on clower in a lawnGardening with Deer

Friday, April 17, 2020, 10:00 AM – 11:00 AM

There are beautiful plants deer don’t like to eat! Incorporate these perennials, annuals and shrubs in your landscape to create an attractive yard with three seasons of bloom. Also learn about physical and scent strategies to reduce deer browsing in your yard

Cornell Cooperative Extension – Suffolk County


Wicker basket full of lettuce, tomaotes, peppers, beets, turnips,onions and a sprig of mintOrganic Vegetable Garden

Monday, April 20, 2020, 10:00 AM – 11:00 AM

Learn how to grow food in your backyard. This session covers the 5 keys to a successful vegetable garden: location, soil preparation, plan, planting choices and good maintenance. No green thumb needed to get started.

Cornell Cooperative Extension – Suffolk County


Turquoise handled pruning shears surrounde by flower petalsTraining and Pruning Trees

Monday, April 20, 6:30 PM -7:30 PM

Learn about the pruning when trees are young to shape their future, and pruning needs as trees grow.

Cornell Cooperative Extension – Tompkins County


A butterfly on a pink zinniaPollinator Gardens

Tuesday, April 21, 2020, 10:00 AM – 11:00 AM

Butterflies, birds and the other pollinators need host plants for nectar, food and lodging. By introducing three seasons of key pollinator plants into your garden, you can create a pollinator-friendly habitat in your front and back yard. Discover the best planting arrangements as well the many colorful and hardy plants attractive to pollinators

Cornell Cooperative Extension – Suffolk County


Plastic Waste - a pile of plastic water bottles, straws, pill packs and bagsGet Drastic with Plastic

Wednesday, April 22, 2020, 5:00 PM – 6:00 PM

Happy Earth Day! Join our discussion about the harm that plastics do to our environment, and how we can each reduce our consumption of single use plastics.

Cornell Cooperative Extension – Putnam County


Someone spraying a container of seedlings with alarge yellow spray bottlSafe Pesticide Use for Home Gardeners

Wednesday, April 22, 2020, 7:00 PM – 8:00 PM

No matter what type of garden you have, chances are you will encounter problems. Join us for a presentation introducing home gardeners to alternative pest control methods to use before reaching for a pesticide. When a pesticide is necessary, learn about product selection and proper application techniques to protect yourself as well as the environment. This presentation will focus on less toxic alternatives and provide proper safety tips when using or storing pesticides.

Cornell Cooperative Extension – Oneida County


Wicker basket full of lettuce, tomaotes, peppers, beets, turnips,onions and a sprig of mintOrganic Vegetable Gardening

Thursday, April 23, 2020, 3:00 PM – 4:00 PM

Learn how to grow food in your backyard. This session covers the 5 keys to a successful vegetable garden: location, soil preparation, plan, planting choices and good maintenance. No green thumb needed to get started.

Cornell Cooperative Extension – Suffolk County


Dark red trillium - Flower with three petals and large white stemens in the middleNative Plants in your Garden

Friday, April 24, 2020, 10:00 AM – 11:00 AM

Native plants are the best choices for Long Island gardeners. Not only are they vigorous and attractive, but native plants support our pollinators. Discover the increasing array of handsome native plants that can you can incorporate in your landscape.

Cornell Cooperative Extension – Suffolk County


Wicker basket full of lettuce, tomaotes, peppers, beets, turnips,onions and a sprig of mintGrow Your Own Vegetables

Saturday, April 25, 2020, 10:00 AM – 11:30 AM

This class is perfect for folks who are in their first year or so of gardening. You’ll learn how to pick a location for your garden, plan what to grow, make sure your soil is healthy, and more!

Cornell Cooperative Extension – Putnam County


Turquoise handled pruning shears surrounde by flower petalsPruning Shrubs

Monday, April 27, 6:30 PM -7:30 PM

Learn about practices that make shrubs look new again and help them fit in the landscape.

Cornell Cooperative Extension – Tompkins County


Hummingbird feeding from a red flowerHummingbirds in your Garden

Monday, April 27, 2020, 7:00 PM – 8:00 PM

Create the proper habitat for these magical creatures by providing them with nectar sources from appropriate flowers and sugar feeders. If you build the right garden for them, they will come! Discover amazing facts about these tiny birds while viewing photographs of them in action.

Cornell Cooperative Extension – Suffolk County


A garden patch of magenta, orange and yellow zinniasGrowing Cut Flowers

Wednesday, April 29, 2020, 6:00 PM – 8:00 PM

What a joyful privilege to bring colorful blooms inside! Join us to learn about annual flower varieties that are easy to grow in your home garden and lend themselves to making beautiful arrangements.

Cornell Cooperative Extension – Tompkins County


Pile of kitchen scraps, mostly peels of various fruits and vegetables, spead out on top of a compost pileComposting Basics

Wednesday, April 29, 2020, 7:00 PM – 8:00 PM

What should you do with all your vegetable scraps? Join Holly Wise, Consumer Horticulture Resource Educator, for composting basics. She will explain the composting process and the benefits of using compost in your gardens. She will provide a recipe for making it. Along with discussing the different types of compost systems.

Cornell Cooperative Extension – Oneida County


Bumble bee on a pink flowerPlant a Pollinator Paradise

Saturdays, May 2 &  9, 2020, 9:30 AM – 11:00 AM

Pollinators are in trouble, but luckily each of us can have a part in ensuring a healthy environment for them. Join us for an in depth and interactive look at how to plan and create a pollinator garden on your property. Whether you have acres or just a front porch, you can create pollinator habitat. This is a two-part class with some at-home work.

Cornell Cooperative Extension – Putnam County


A cluster of cherry tomatoes growing on a tomato plant wet with the morning dew.Growing Vegetables and Small Fruits

Wednesday, May 6, 2020, 7:00 PM – 8:00 PM

There’s magic in growing your own food, whether it’s a just-picked tomato or a handful of fresh strawberries. However, growing your own food doesn’t have to be complicated and you don’t even need a large space. Join us and learn what you need to know to get started, focusing on smaller spaces, including raised beds and using containers for your fruits and vegetables. Learn the importance of good soil, when and how to plant, how to use seeds and transplants, what grows best in this area, how to deal with pests, and where to go for help.

Cornell Cooperative Extension – Oneida County

April is Citizen Science Month!

What is citizen science? 

Scientists are limited in the amount of data they can collect by both time and money.  With help from members of the general public, known as citizen scientists, researchers are able to crowd source data collection collecting more data from more places helping them find answers to real-world questions.

So if you want to do something fun and educational that contributes to the advancement of scientific knowledge, consider becoming a citizen scientist.

Citizen Science Projects


Monarch Butterfly (Orang and Black) - Jouney NorthThe Journey North

This project focuses on migration and seasonal changes.   People all over the United States, Canada, and Mexico, report sightings of birds, monarchs, frogs, and other organism.   Watch as reported sightings are mapped in real-time as waves of migrations that move across the continent.


inaturalist logoi-Naturalist

iNaturalist lets you photograph, identify, and document what’s around you.  Every observation can contribute to biodiversity science, from the rarest butterfly to the most common backyard weed.  By sharing your observations with scientists, you will help build our understanding of the natural world.

Never Home Alone

In studying life, scientists have overlooked many regions. Some regions have not been studied because they are so remote. Others because they are so diverse that it is hard to know where to even begin. Then there is the great indoors, which we believe has been understudied in part because it is so immediate. This project aims to document the species that live indoors with humans.


The Cornell Lab of Ornithology - Logo with Bird in MiddleThe Cornell Lab of Ornithology

Hundreds of thousands of people around the world contribute bird observations to the Cornell Lab of Ornithology each year, gathering data on a scale once unimaginable. Scientists use these data to reveal how birds are affected by habitat loss, pollution, disease, climate, and other environmental changes. Your participation will help trace bird migration, nesting success, and changes in bird numbers through time.

Celebrate Urban Birds

Celebrate Urban Birds is a citizen science project focused on better understanding the value of green spaces for birds. This project connects people of all ages and backgrounds to birds and the natural world through the arts and fun neighborhood activities.

e-bird

The goal of this project is to gather this information on bird sightings, archive it, and freely share it to power new data-driven approaches to science, conservation and education.  e-Bird also develops tools that make birding more rewarding.  It provides the most current and useful information to the birding community from photos and audio recordings, to seeing real-time maps of species distribution and alerts that let you know when species have been seen.

NestWatch

NestWatch is a nationwide monitoring program designed to track status and trends in the reproductive biology of birds, including when nesting occurs, number of eggs laid, how many eggs hatch, and how many hatchlings survive.  Their database is intended to be used to study the current condition of breeding bird populations and how they may be changing over time as a result of climate change, habitat degradation and loss, expansion of urban areas, and the introduction of non-native plants and animals.


Logo - The Tick App - Bulls Eye with a the outline of a tick in the miidle suurounded by the words The Tick AppThe Tick App

The Tick App allows people living in high-risk areas for Lyme disease, like Orange County New York, to participate in a tick behavioral study.   Participants complete daily logs and report ticks.  The app provides information on how to remove ticks, prevent tick bites, and general information about ticks.   When enough people are involved, it can also provides information about blacklegged and deer tick activity in our area.


Monarch Caterpilar (Yellow, white, black stripped) on a green leaf - Monarch Larva Monitoring ProjectMonarch Larva Monitoring Program

This citizen science project’s mission is to better understand the distribution and abundance of breeding monarchs and to use that knowledge to inform and inspire monarch conservation.  People from across the United States and Canada participate in this monarch research.  Their observations aid in conserving monarchs and their threatened migratory phenomenon, and advance the understanding of butterfly ecology in general.


Logo - Monarch Watch.org Education, Conservation, ResearchMonarch Watch

Monarch Watch strives to provide the public with information about the biology of monarch butterflies, their spectacular migration, and how to use monarchs to further science education in primary and secondary schools. They engage in research on monarch migration biology and monarch population dynamics to better understand how to conserve the monarch migration.

Monarch Calendar Project

In the spring and fall volunteers collect observations of adult monarchs.  This information is used to  assemble quantitative data on monarch numbers at critical times during the breeding season.

Tagging Monarchs

Each fall Monarch Watch distributes more than a quarter of a million tags to thousands of volunteers across North America who tag monarchs as they migrate through their area. These citizen scientists capture monarchs throughout the migration season, record the tag code, tag date, gender of the butterfly, and geographic location then tag and release them. At the end of the tagging season, these data are submitted to Monarch Watch and added to their database to be used in research.


Logo - The Lost Ladybug ProjectThe Lost Ladybug Project

In the past twenty years, native ladybugs that were once very common have become extremely rare.  During this same time, ladybugs from other parts of the world have greatly increased in both numbers and range. This is happening very quickly and no one knows how, why, or what impact it will have on ladybug diversity.  Citizen scientists involved in this project help scientists answer these questions by photographing ladybugs and submitting the photos along with information about when and where the ladybugs were found.


Logo - Vegetable Varieties for GardenersVegetable Varieties for Gardeners

A project of Cornell University’s Garden Based Learning, this web forum provides an avenue for gardeners to share knowledge.  Gardeners report what vegetable varieties perform well – and not so well – in their gardens.  Other gardeners can view ratings and read the reviews to decide which might work well for them.  Researchers  use the information gain new insight into the performance of vegetable varieties under a wide range of conditions and practices. The information gathered is also used to make a  Selected List of Vegetable Varieties for Gardeners in New York State.


Logo - The outline of New York State under a picture of a moth, a beetle, a moth and a fly with the words Empire State Native Pollinator SurveyEmpire State Native Pollinator Survey

Native pollinators play an essential role in the pollination of flowering plants, including native plants and wildflowers, garden plants, as well as cultivated crops. Some native pollinator species have suffered population declines over the last few decades.   Participants  in this study submit photographs and/or specimens to help  determine the conservation status of a wide array of native insect pollinators in non-agricultural habitats.


iMapInvasivesiMapInvasives

iMapInvasives is an on-line, GIS-based data management system used to assist citizen scientists and natural resource professionals working to protect our natural resources from the threat of invasive species.  Citizen scientists are provided with resources to help them identify invasive species. Their invasive species findings are aggregated with data from a wide variety of sources contributing to early detection of invasive species as well as analysis of management strategies.


A curated beetle collection with pinned specimens above tagsNotes from Nature

Natural history museums across the world share a common goal – to conserve and make available knowledge about natural and cultural heritage. The Notes from Nature project gives you the opportunity to make a scientifically important contribution towards that goal by transcribing museum records. Every transcription that is completed brings us closer to filling gaps in our knowledge of global biodiversity and natural heritage.


Logo - citizenscience.orgCitizen Science Database

This is an official government website designed to accelerate the use of crowdsourcing and citizen science across the U.S. government.  It includes a searchable database of  a government-wide listing of citizen science and crowdsourcing projects designed to improve cross-agency collaboration, reveal opportunities for new high-impact projects, and make it easier for volunteers to find out about projects they can join.


Become a Citizen Scientist today!

Cornell Cooperative Extension Orange County

Skip to toolbar