New York State IPM Program

July 24, 2020
by Debra E. Marvin
Comments Off on SIGN UP FOR OUR CONFERENCE: School IPM 2020: Where We’ve Been and What’s Next

SIGN UP FOR OUR CONFERENCE: School IPM 2020: Where We’ve Been and What’s Next

A Virtual Two Half-Day Conference

When: Mornings of August 11 & 18, 2020

Where: We will be connecting via Zoom.

How: Click Here to Register

Cost: $15 per person or $25 per school district

PESTICIDE APPLICATOR CREDITS AVAILABLE:

NYSIPM Conference 2020 pesticide recertification credits

NYS Pesticide Applicator recertification credits have been awarded for the following categories: Core, 3A, 3B, 7A, 7F, and 8. Individuals seeking credits will need to submit their applicator ID numbers when pre-registering. Further instructions will be sent upon pre-registering.

Despite decades of promoting school integrated pest management (IPM), bed bugs, cockroaches, lice, and mice continue to be a problem in schools. Part of the issue is lack of implementation of proven IPM techniques such as exclusion. Part of the issue is that some pests, like bed bugs, German cockroaches and lice arrive in backpacks, delivered supplies, and directly on students and staff. While schools often have plans in place to address these pests when they are discovered, it will take a wider community effort to prevent their introductions.

The Sixth Annual NYS IPM conference brings together a wide range of speakers to address and discuss the status of school IPM adoption and where we need to go in the future. If you or your family is impacted by pests or pest management on and off school property, this virtual conference is for you.

Alejandro A. Calixto, our new NYS IPM Program director, will be introducing the conference with remarks on “Perceptions of IPM and Today’s Social Climate.”

Our keynote speaker, Lorraine Maxwell, will discuss “Healthy Environments for Learning”. Her research has found that school building conditions, which include conducive conditions for pests as well as the presence of pests, impact the school’s social climate, which directly impacts student performance.

cartoon of a bed bug, tick, and cockroach who are disappointed to see they are not allowed to go to school. The tick has a mouse pull-toy, and the cockroach has a corona-virus balloon. The bed bug holds a lunch bag.

Conference Agendas

Day 1, August 11, 2020
8:00 Registration: Please Note: if you answered yes during pre-registration to needing pesticide credits, it is important to log into the conference at this time to show your applicator card with picture ID via webcam
8:30 Welcome and Introductory Remarks: Alejandro Calixto, Director, NYS IPM Program at Cornell University, “Perceptions of Integrated Pest Management and Today’s Social Climate”
8:45 Keynote Presentation: Lorraine Maxwell, Associate Professor Emerti, Department of Design and Environmental Analysis, Cornell University, “Healthy Environments for Learning”
9:30 The Status of IPM Implementation within NYS Schools

  • Lynn Braband, Retired, NYSIPM Program
  • Daryl Andreades, Senior Architect, NYS Department of Education
  • Claire Barnett, Founder and Executive Director, Healthy Schools Network
  • Fred Koelbel, NYS School Facilities Association and Port Jefferson School District
10:50 Break
11:15 Panel Discussion
12:15 Concluding Remarks and Adjourn
Day 2, August 18, 2020
8:00 Registration: Please Note: if you answered yes during pre-registration to needing pesticide credits, it is important to log into the conference at this time to show your applicator card with picture ID via webcam
8:30 Welcome & Recap of August 11 Session
9:00 Virtual “tabling” event: Five-minute presentations by partnering organizations describing the services they provide schools.
9:45 What We’re Doing – Community Interventions. Models of community-level pest management. What may we learn from these examples as applied to school pests with strong community connections?

  • 9:45    Dina Fonseca, Rutgers Center for Vector Biology: Community-Level Mosquito Control
  • 10:15   Paul D. Curtis, Department of Natural Resources, Cornell University: Community-based Deer Management in New York State
  • 10:45    Robert Corrigan, Corrigan Consulting, Briarcliff Manor, NY: Identifying and Understanding the Rodent Vulnerable Areas (RVAs) of Schools: Essential for Sustainable IPM
11:15 Break
11:30 Break Out Groups: Identifying Strategies for Interventions for School Pests with Strong Community Connections. Moderated by NYS IPM Program staff, participants will identify common pathways by which targeted pests are introduced to schools and will develop interventions that will prevent or reduce those problems. Participants will also interact about the roles of collaboration, communication, and education in implementing the interventions. Essentially the goal of the break out group will to begin the development of an IPM program for the targeted pest at the community level. One group each will address bed bugs (moderated by Jody Gangloff-Kaufmann) and cockroaches (moderated by Matthew Frye and Amara Dunn). A third break out group (moderated by Joellen Lampman) will begin the process of establishing school IPM priorities, both in school buildings and on school grounds, for NYS, using the School IPM Priorities of the Northeastern U. S. as a starting point.
12:15 Report and Wrap-Up: The break out groups will each give a brief oral report on the results of their interactions; followed by a general discussion and concluding remarks.
1:00 Adjourn

Sponsors:

May 5, 2020
by Debra E. Marvin
Comments Off on Our 2018-2019 Annual Report: #4 Tick Management!

Our 2018-2019 Annual Report: #4 Tick Management!

Getting Schooled in Tick Management

photo shows a man at a tick workshop with a completed tick drag

(Above) Success! With his pants tucked into his socks, and having just assembled his own tick drag mat, workshop attendee Fred Koelbel has a right to feel accomplished. Thanks to the Long Island host district, Three Village—and our training—he’s now ready to reduce the incidence of tick bite risk in his own district.

Ticks are a problem everywhere, but schools are a special concern. We want kids to spend time outside playing sports and enjoying nature. But we want them to be safe too. Did you know that children aged five to nine years old have the highest incidence of Lyme disease? To help protect children at school, we developed a Tick Awareness and Management for Schools workshop that teaches school facilities staff how to assess and mitigate tick risks. Workshop lessons include tick biology and ecology, how to build a drag mat for detecting ticks, and time outside practicing tick survey methods. Managers learn how to reduce kids’ exposure to ticks, and involve teachers and students in the process. First piloted in Suffolk County, the workshop—now offered statewide—continues to improve with participant input.

Think ticks might be a problem on your school grounds? NYSIPM staff offer consultation ns and risk assessments to help schools determine if ticks are present and abundant. So far, 20 schools have been evaluated, and grounds managers discovered how they could reduce risk or limit areas accessible to kids and staff. School nurses and health educators also benefitted from training, thanks to the NYS Center for School Health Seminars that hosted Don’t Get Ticked NY! information booths.

Learning how to keep kids safe and avoid ticks is one lesson school professionals won’t want to miss.

photo shows the monitoring ticks poster

POSTER: How to Monitor for Ticks in Your School Yard.

Above: Show and tell. This poster and twelve more like it provide easy-to-understand guidance in the fight against tick-borne disease. Download, print and share. They’re just part of the extensive science-based, well-informed resources on our Don’t Get Ticked New York website, www.DontGetTickedNY.org.

Curious about habitat, repellants, monitoring for ticks, or minimizing risk? You should be. And don’t forget that daily tick check!

 

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