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SWD monitoring video

The July 16, 2014 You Tube video from the Finger Lakes monitoring network shows male and female SWD alongside other fruit flies. Check out these videos to hone your skills at differentiating other fruit flies caught in traps from spotted wing Drosophila. Anna Wallingford, Postdoctoral Research Associate in Greg Loeb’s program, Department of Entomology, Cornell University, Geneva, brings us these early each week. Check it out at https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCdiZ_cu0CFO8AYfN1EyctQg.

A still from the latest SWD video showing a female SWD next to an imposter.

A still from the latest SWD video showing a female SWD below an imposter. Note the SWD’s large distended ovipositor and large, red eyes.

Monroe County – first find

Three female SWD were caught, one per trap, in a Monroe County summer raspberry planting in the week ending July 21, 2014 by Jacob Robinson, summer technician in Juliet Carroll’s Fruit IPM Program. The summer raspberries are ripe and nearing the end of harvest. Because this planting is adjacent to a blueberry planting, it will be important to carefully plan an insecticide management program to protect the ripening blueberries.  (Accumulated GDD 1296; day length 14:50)

Ontario County – first find

SWD adults have been caught at two locations in Ontario County this week ending July 17, 2014, five at one location and three at the other. All traps were the apple cider vinegar and fermenting dough cup trap and are monitored by Gabrielle Brind’Amour in Greg Loeb’s program, Dept of Entomology, Cornell University, Geneva, NY. At one location, three females, one per trap, were caught in a summer raspberry planting; one of the traps was on the edge of the planting and the other two were within the crop. At that same location, one male and one female were caught in a trap placed in the nearby woods. At the second Ontario County location, one male and one female were caught in a trap on the edge of a blueberry planting, as well as a single male in a trap at the woods’ edge facing the blueberry planting. (GDD 1235, day length 14:55)

First v. Sustained Trap Catch

Sustained trap catch is a milestone often used in IPM for timing management tactics against insect pests. Insect traps in the SWD monitoring network are checked once per week until adult SWD have been caught for two consecutive weeks at that location, indicating sustained trap catch.

On the blog, we post SWD first catch reports. Some of these reports may not prove to be first sustained trap catch because SWD adults are not caught the following week. This was the case this week for the traps in Suffolk, Onondaga, and Cayuga Counties. No SWD adults were caught at these locations this week, July 14 to 18, and in Suffolk County, no infested fruit was detected.

This indicates that SWD populations are still very low in NY. Cultural practices such as removing overripe berries from the planting, clean picking, dragging equipment across the ground to squash and break up dropped berries, etc., may provide some benefit, particularly in crops that are nearing the end of the harvest window, such as summer raspberries.

SWD trap, set in summer raspberry. The trap contains an apple cider vinegar drowning solution and a specimen cup with a wheat dough bait. Traps are checked weekly.

SWD trap, set in summer raspberry. The trap contains an apple cider vinegar drowning solution in which a specimen cup containing a wheat dough bait floats. Traps are checked weekly.

Schuyler County – first find

A single male and a single female were found on July 16, 2014 in yeast baited apple cider vinegar traps in Schuyler County by Gabrielle (Gabe) Brind’Amour in Greg Loeb’s program, Dept of Entomology, Cornell University, Geneva, NY. The male was in a trap set in the wooded edge of a blueberry planting and the female was in a trap on the edge of a summer raspberry planting. (GDD 1305, day length 14:54)

Because the population of SWD is still at very low levels in NY, take time to review available insecticides and plan a program for at-risk fruit that is beginning to ripen. Berry insecticide tables and tree fruit and grape insecticide tables are found on Cornell Fruit Resources.

Seneca County – first find

A single male SWD was caught on July 16, 2014 in a yeast baited apple cider vinegar trap set in a blueberry planting in Seneca County by Gabrielle (Gabe) Brind’Amour in Greg Loeb’s program, Dept of Entomology, Cornell University, Geneva, NY. The population of SWD is still at very low levels in NY, providing an opportunity for growers to practice sanitation or clean-picking of fruit that is nearing the end of the harvest period. This early alert provides an opportunity to review available insecticides and plan a program for at-risk fruit that is beginning to ripen. (GDD 1270, day length 14:55)

All positive finds reported to date have been single individuals caught in single traps. There are two to four traps set at each monitoring location. Cornell Cooperative Extension has set 192 traps at 52 sites in New York. Traps are checked weekly.

Niagara County – first find

A single female was caught on July 15, 2014 at each of two locations in Niagara County. One location is a raspberry planting and the other is a blueberry planting. Two yeast baited solo cup traps were set at both locations by Liz Tee in Deborah Breth’s Lake Ontario Fruit Program, Cornell Cooperative Extension. Fruit is ripe and ripening. An up-to-date distribution map for NY and the Eastern US can be found on the Cornell Fruit Resources SWD Distribution page, courtesy of the Southern Region IPM Center and the University of Georgia Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystems Health. (raspberry site GDD 1120; day length 15:00) (blueberry site GDD 1023; day length 15:01)

Distribution of SWD first finds in NY, as of the morning of July 15, 2014. This map is updated automatically from data entered by the Cornell Cooperative Extension SWD monitoring network.

Distribution of SWD first finds in NY, as of the morning of July 15, 2014. This map is updated automatically from data entered by the Cornell Cooperative Extension SWD monitoring network.

Cayuga County – first find

A single female SWD was caught in one of four yeast-baited apple cider vinegar traps checked on July 8, 2014 and set in a summer raspberry planting in Cayuga County by Juliet Carroll, NYS IPM Program. Fruit is ripe and nearing the end of harvest. Because at this time the SWD population is very low, if no other susceptible fruit is nearby and ripe, it may prove judicious to hold off on an insecticide management program. Consider creative approaches to sanitation in U-pick plantings such as providing a discount on purchased fruit when the customer brings in an extra bucket of damaged and over-ripe fruit to the counter. Keep track of fruit ripening in other berry crops and plan to protect these with insecticides in the coming weeks. (Accumulated GDD 1124; day length 15:05)

SWD female caught in Cayuga County on July 8, 2014. Note the large, sclerotized ovipositor.

SWD female caught in Cayuga County on July 8, 2014. Note the large, sclerotized ovipositor.

Onondaga County – first find

A single male SWD was caught in one of four yeast-baited apple cider vinegar traps checked on July 8, 2014 and set in a summer raspberry planting, variety Prelude, in Onondaga County by Juliet Carroll, NYS IPM Program. Fruit is ripe and being harvested. At this time the SWD population is very low and although cultural practices such as harvesting fruits frequently and removing rotten fruits from the field will help keep the SWD population down, if susceptible fruit is nearby and ripening, it may prove judicious to consider planning for and beginning an insecticide management program. SWD populations and damage can increase dramatically with favorable weather and susceptible ripe fruits. The weather in central NY has been cool at night with daytime temperatures in the upper 70′s and low 80′s. Insecticide applications are necessary when SWD populations are high. Insecticides labeled for use in commercial berry production are tabulated on the Cornell Fruit Resources’ SWD website. (Accumulated GDD 1169; day length 15:09)

The single male SWD caught in traps checked on July 8, 2014. Note the two black combs on each front leg and the distinctive single spot on each wing.

The single male SWD caught in traps checked on July 8, 2014. Note the two black combs on each front leg and the distinctive single spot on each wing.

First find in NY – Suffolk Co.

The first two female SWD of the 2014 growing season were captured over the week of July 3 to 9 in traps monitored by Faruque Zaman, Long Island Horticultural Research and Extension Center, Suffolk County Cornell Cooperative Extension in a yeast-baited trap at a ripening raspberry location in eastern Long Island.

On July 9, examination of 40 fruits found 2 SWD-infested raspberries with egg-laying sites at that location. The raspberry field is surrounded by grapes on one side and blackberries on the other side; no adjacent forest boundaries. No SWD have been captured in traps placed in other locations in Suffolk County, including blueberry, blackberry, grape, forest and a second raspberry site and no fruit infestation was found in raspberries collected from the second site.

At this time the SWD population appears to be very low. Therefore, cultural practices such as harvesting fruits frequently and removing rotten fruits from the field will help keep the SWD population down. Also, remove alternate weed hosts, pokeweed and bittersweet nightshade, from the area before these weeds develop fruit. SWD populations and damage can increase dramatically with favorable weather and susceptible ripe fruits. Insecticide applications are necessary when SWD populations are high. Insecticide control requires frequent applications (5-7 day interval), so delay onset of spraying until sustained captures occur in your area to maximize the utility of the applied materials.

Two female spotted wing Drosophila captured in traps on Long Island on July 9, 2014.

Two female spotted wing Drosophila captured in traps on Long Island on July 9, 2014.

 

 

 

 

 

Tiny threads of the SWD egg breathing tubes indicate where an egg was laid in a raspberry. Two eggs were found in 40 fruits examined.

Tiny threads of the SWD egg breathing tubes indicate where an egg was laid in a raspberry. Two eggs were found in 40 fruits examined on July 9, 2014.

 

 

 

 

 

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