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Wayne County sustained catch

For two weeks in a row, SWD has been caught in traps set in a raspberry planting in Wayne County. SWD was caught in all four traps set in the planting, two within the crop and two on the edge of the panting. Four female and one male SWD were caught at this site in traps checked on Monday, June 27, 2016. Traps at this location are being monitored by Nicole Mattoon, technician with Dr. Juliet Carroll’s fruit IPM program, NYS IPM Program, Cornell University, Geneva. Summer raspberry harvest is beginning in this region.

A fruit sample of 25 fruit was collected near the edge trap that had caught a single female SWD the previous week. No evidence of eggs or larvae were seen via microscoic examination of the fruit, nor were any eggs or larvae found via salt flotation. However, it is only a matter of time before the females mate and are ready to lay eggs in the ripening crop!

Please review all management practices and monitoring tactics for this insect on Cornell Fruit Resources. It will be crucial to be proactive with SWD management and fruit sampling this year.

Plan to attend the Cornell Fruit Field Day!

Mark your calendars for the Cornell Fruit Field Day, to be held in Geneva, NY on Wednesday, July 20.  The 2016 version of this triennial event will feature ongoing research in berries, hops, grapes, and tree fruit, and is being organized by Cornell University, the NYS Agricultural Experiment Station (NYSAES), the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Fruit Program Work Team, and Cornell Cooperative Extension. All interested persons are invited to learn about the fruit research under way at Cornell University.  Attendees will be able to select from tours of different fruit commodities.

The event will feature a number of topics, including:

  • Berries

Spotted wing drosophila (SWD) research update | Hummingbird use | SWD monitoring network | Exclusion netting against SWD in fall raspberries | Monitoring and SWD management decisions in summer raspberry & blueberry | Behavioral control of SWD with repellents and attract & kill stations | Effect of habitat diversity on ecosystem services for strawberries | High tunnel production of black and red raspberries | Day-neutral strawberries and low tunnel production

  • Tree Fruits

Apple breeding & genetic studies | Research updates on fire blight, apple scab, powdery mildew | Bitter pit in Honeycrisp | 3D camera canopy imaging | Ambrosia beetle management trials | Malus selections for cider production | Precision spraying in orchards | Role of insects in spreading fire blight in apples | Bacterial canker of sweet cherry | Rootstocks & training systems for sweet cherry | NC-140 rootstock trials on Honeycrisp & SnapDragon | Pear rootstocks & training systems

  • Grapes & Hops

Sour rot of grapes | VitisGen grape breeding project | Precision spraying in grapes | Managing the spread of leafroll virus in Vinifera grape using insecticides & vine removal | Early leaf removal on Riesling | Overview of NYSAES hops planting | Powdery & downy mildew management in hops | Hops weed management & mite biocontrol | Update on malting barley research

  • also food safety information!

FSMA (Food Safety Modernization Act) Produce Safety Rule

  • Fruit Field Day details

The event will take place at the NYSAES Fruit and Vegetable Research Farm South, 1097 County Road No. 4, 1 mile west of Pre-emption Rd. in Geneva, NY.

Arrive at 8:00 AM to get settled in. Tours begin promptly at 8:30 AM and are scheduled in the morning from 8:30 to 11:30 and in the afternoon from 1:30 to 5:00. Lunch will be served at the exhibit tent area between 11:30-12:30.

Visit sponsors anytime from 11:30-1:30! Learn about products and services from Agro Liquid | Arysta Life Science | Dow AgroSciences | Dupont | Farm Credit East, ACA | Finger Lakes Trellis Supply | LaGasse Works, Inc. | Lakeview Vineyard Equipment | NY Apple Sales | OESCO, Inc | Red Jacket Orchards | Superior Wind Machine Service | Valent USA Corp. | Wafler Farms | tastings from War Horse Brewing

To participate as a sponsor, see the registration page or contact Shelly Cowles (315-787-2274; mw69@cornell.edu).

  • Register now!

Admission fee is $50/person ($40 for additional attendees from the same farm or business). Your admission covers tours, lunch and educational materials. Pre-registration is required. Walk-in registration may be available for a $10 surcharge on the day of the event. Register on the Cornell Fruit Field Day Event registration page, http://events.cals.cornell.edu/ffd2016

Ontario County sustained catch

For two weeks in a row, SWD has been caught in traps set in a blueberry planting in Ontario County. Three females were caught at this site late last week. Traps at this location are being monitored by Gabrielle Brind’Amour, technician with Dr. Greg Loeb’s small fruit entomology program, NYSAES, Cornell University, Geneva. Blueberries are starting to color in the Finger Lakes region.

Yikes! This is an early build up of SWD. Please review all management practices and monitoring tactics for this insect on Cornell Fruit Resources. It will be crucial to be proactive with SWD management and fruit sampling this year.

Yates County first find

A single female was caught in one of four traps checked on Thursday, June 23, 2016. The trap was set on the edge of a summer raspberry planting in which ripening berries were present last week.Traps at this location are being monitored by Gabrielle Brind’Amour, technician with Dr. Greg Loeb’s small fruit entomology program, NYSAES, Cornell University, Geneva.

With the advent of a ripe summer raspberry crop and the presence of SWD, it will be very important to plan and carry out an insecticide program to protect berry crops from infestation by this invasive pest. A quick guide to labeled insecticides in NY for berries and their attributes, timings, and restrictions is available on the Cornell Fruit Resources SWD webpages.

Remember, a single female SWD can lay upwards of 300 eggs during her 20 to 30 day life span.

Ulster County first find

Two female and 1 male SWD were caught on June 23, 2016 in traps set in a summer and fall raspberry planting in Ulster County. Traps at this site are being monitored by Jim O’Connell, Ulster County Cornell Cooperative Extension and Eastern NY Commercial Horticulture Program.

FemaleSWD_2016_UlsterBecause summer raspberry was ripening at this site, 25 fruit were examined for the presence of egg laying. Only one egg was found in one of the 25 fruit. This indicates that there is a low level of fruit infestation in the summer raspberry crop.

If summer raspberry are ripe or ripening, it may be prudent to begin a management program for SWD. This year, due to the early arrival of SWD in New York, it is likely that summer raspberry will be vulnerable to fruit infestation. More information on SWD management is available on the Cornell Fruit Resources SWD page.

Wayne County first find

Two female SWD were caught on June 21, 2016 in two of four traps set in a raspberry planting in Wayne County. These traps are being monitored by Juliet Carroll, fruit IPM coordinator, and Nicole Mattoon, IPM technician, with the NY State IPM Program. Raspberries in the planting are not yet ripe. The two traps were set on the edge of the planting. Two other traps, set within the crop, caught no SWD.

Albany County first find

Three female SWD were caught on June 21, 2016 in two of four traps set in a raspberry planting in Albany County. These traps are being monitored by Laura McDermott, extension specialist, and Annie Mills, field technician, with the Eastern NY Commercial Horticulture Program of Cornell Cooperative Extension. The traps that caught the SWD were set within the crop. The other two traps, set in a hedgerow of mostly sumac next to the planting, caught no SWD.

Niagara County first find

A single SWD female was caught in Niagara County on Friday, June 17, 2016 by Tess Grasswitz, IPM Specialist, and Liz Tee, Technician, Lake Ontario Fruit Program, Cornell Cooperative Extension. The trap was on the edge of a blueberry field in wild trees and shrubs. The blueberries in the planting are not yet ripe.

Ontario County first network find

A single female was caught in a blueberry planting in Ontario County in a trap that is part of the SWD monitoring network on June 16, 2016. The blueberry fruit at this site is not yet ripe. This report comes in from Gabrielle Brind’Amour, who works with Dr. Greg Loeb’s small fruit entomology research program at Cornell University, Geneva, NY. No other traps being monitored in Ontario County by this team caught SWD.

Suffolk County sustained capture

SWD capture was sustained this week in Suffolk County at the blueberry planting. A total of 4 SWD were caught in traps checked on June 15, 2016. Dr. Faruque Zaman, Suffolk County Cornell Cooperative Extension and Long Island Horticutural Research and Extension Center, has two traps (one set on the crop border row and one set within the crop) in each of four crops: (1) blueberry, where he has now seen sustained capture of SWD, (2) blackberry, (3) summer raspberry, and (4) grape. Only in the grape traps was SWD not caught this week.

In blackberry, both traps caught a total of five SWD. In summer raspberry, both traps caught SWD—4 females and 1 male in the border trap and 1 female and 1 male in the trap in the planting. This summer raspberry planting has <1% ripe fruit. A collection of 30 nearly ripe fruit (see picture) were examined in the laboratory for egg laying sites and none were found.

A sample of 30 summer raspberry fruit were checked in the laboratory for SWD breathing tubes, which are indicative of egg laying sites, and none were found.

A sample of 30 summer raspberry fruit were checked in the laboratory for SWD breathing tubes, which are indicative of egg laying sites, and none were found.

Growers, extension educators, and consultants are advised that because this is an early year for SWD arrival in New York. It will be very important to check summer raspberry and blueberry fruit for signs of SWD infestation in order to time the beginning of insecticide sprays, rather than relying solely on trap captures. For late season maturing fruit (fall raspberry, late season blueberry, elderberry, day neutral strawberry, blackberry, stone fruit and susceptible grape varieties) it will likely prove to be a very challenging year for SWD management.

 

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