February 24, 2018

Greenhouse Vegetable IPM update

I suspect you are all hard at it as the days warm up and we dream of eating things other than root vegetables!

e-GRO is an online source of electronic grower resources. They publish a series called Edible Alerts (but please don’t try to eat them). The most recent IPM oriented are on magnesium deficiency of hydroponic and container grown basil and pythium root rot on hydroponically grown basil and spinach (by our own Neil Mattson).

Don’t worry if you aren’t growing in containers or hydroponically, there are lots of other posts that may apply. You can find them all here.

 

Have a great week!

February 22, 2018

Christmas tree IPM update 2.22.18

I hope you are all sitting with your feet up – briefly – until the scouting etc. season starts.

Or maybe now you are ready to get out there and get started for this year. The weather at the beginning of the week might have helped. But it was also warm enough that ticks were out questing. NYS IPM’s Joellen Lampman posted on our blog with lots of useful tick information

It’s also time to start planning . . .
WPS training requirements have changed. Be sure you know what is required in terms of who can do the training and how it must be presented. Lots of resources are available from the Pesticide Educational Resources Collaborative including the appropriate training videos

Don’t forget to sign up for Branching Out  There’s a clickable subscription form and more information.

And you can contact Sarah Pickel to get on her scouting email list from PA at c-sapickel@pa.gov (Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture | Bureau of Plant Industry, 2301 North Cameron Street | Hbg PA 17110, Phone: 717.772.5227 | Fax: 717.705.6518)

We are planning, too. Brian and Amara have been planning our new Christmas tree and beneficial insect habitat demonstration trials. They got the soil samples before the snow started again.

 

February 16, 2018

Greenhouse IPM update 2.16.18

Did you miss me? I was in India for 3 weeks – quite the experience! I did get to a flower market and saw HUGE numbers of marigolds strung into garlands used for religious and decorative reasons. I guess that isn’t really work!

Broad mites – ugh! Hard to see and cause leaf curling and worse. At the meeting in WNY this week an alarming number of people said they had seen them (or the damage they cause) and the incidence seems to be increasing. Probably why the GGS Pro Tech Tip is on broad mites this week.  Also, Dan Gilrein’s article in Greenhouse Management from 2009 (always ahead of the curve, is Dan).  Remember to make sure suggested pesticides are labeled for NYS.

Planning on having thrips? A 6 part series of videos and articles from Greenhouseipm.org walks you through thrips IPM so you can plan not to have thrips.

WPS training requirements have changed. Be sure you know what is required in terms of who can do the training and how it must be presented.  Lots of resources are available from the Pesticide Educational Resources Collaborative  including the appropriate training videos

Feeling like a trip yourselves? Several meetings in Canada coming up.
Vineland Ontario Feb 23 – Greenhouse IPM: Achieving Sustainable Biocontrol

Thiel’s Greenhouse, Bruderheim Alberta Feb 28 – Beyond Sticky Traps: Leveling up your greenhouse biocontrol

The 2018 Cornell Pest Management Guide for Commercial Production and Maintenance of Trees and Shrubs is available now! Print and online available from the Cornell Bookstore.

January 16, 2018

Greenhouse IPM Update 1.16.18

 

Nora’s e-GRO blog post on Bacterial leaf spot and blight – in case you need more information!

Can you tell the difference between a shore fly and a fungus gnat? Do you need to know? It sure helps if you want to control them. Griffin has a new fact sheet on them (just remember to check if listed pesticides are allowed in NYS). Keep scrolling down and you get to information on biological control!

Michigan State has 5 things to consider while gearing up for Spring 2018 – and most of them are IPM – hooray!

And another post on managing substrate pH in soilless substrates – be prepared!

Want to know more about lighting? Check out GLASE (such a clever acronym!)

January 16, 2018

Greenhouse Vegetable IPM Update 1.16.18

That brief warm spell when I was enjoying not wearing boots – almost lost in the shovelarama that followed. But I still remember . . .

I forgot an important conference last week – the NOFA NY 2018 Winter Conference
January 19–21 In Saratoga Springs – lots of high tunnel talks and discussion sessions. Read all about it.

Are you growing in soil? There’s a soil health survey on farmer perspectives in order to better understand the costs and benefits of current soil health practices in New York State – and they may not get the perspective of greenhouse growers. You can find the survey link at the Soil Health Initiative website plus lots of other useful information.

And if you want a trip to Ohio – this year’s Greenhouse Management Workshop (Feb 8-9) is focusing on hydroponics.

January 15, 2018

Christmas tree IPM update 1.14.18

Those warm spells probably aren’t that good for the plants, but oh, I do enjoy them!

We are doing a survey at the CTFANY meeting this year on tick borne diseases and exotic Christmas tree species. If you won’t have a chance to fill it out at the meeting, you can do it here.

I’ve had a couple of questions that relate to DEC matters – pesticide choice and pesticide recertification credits.
I’ll do the easy one first. There are very few instances where credits from another state are allowed for recertification of NYS pesticide licenses. The organizers of the events have to register them with NYS DEC and meet all the specs so it doesn’t happen often. If you can’t find the event on NYSPAD it won’t count – except for making you smarter!

Which reminds me of another question… it rarely makes sense to add another private pesticide category even if you add new crops. DEC says “Applicants should choose the category based on their primary crop, it is not necessary to hold additional categories within the Ag Production series (21-25)”. If you decide to do aquatic pest control, for example, that’s another story.

Now back to the hard question – what to do about pesticide applications in mixed species Christmas tree plantations? Of course, you don’t want to spray anything that would damage any of the species – blue spruce comes up a lot here as some pesticides will take the blue off the needles. But even if the pesticides are all ‘safe’ for the species, the law says that the host and the pest must both be on the label for you to apply that compound to those trees. And finding information on the label – and understanding it – can require you to be quite a sleuth.

I often resort to pulling up the label in NYSPAD ( a different part of it) and using the search button on the computer to look for key words.

Some labels use ‘conifers’, some use ‘Christmas trees’ and probably some use the exact species. Some specify where the trees can be – Christmas tree nursery beds, production plantations, tree seed orchards, etc. Some include the species with the insect or disease and others just list the disease or insect. But you have to find both the host and the pest on the label to use the pesticide.

This is one reason that single species fields are easier to deal with.

There’s more helpful information on which pesticides to use for what and what’s allowed – AND lots of IPM information to reduce your need for pesticides – in the Cornell Guidelines and the 2018 “Tree and Shrub Guidelines” are almost ready!

This is a good time to plan for the insect and disease pests that you usually have, check your pesticide list, and read those labels. Put your feet up first – it might help.