January 21, 2020

Greenhouse IPM Update 1.20.20

Trying to start out on the right foot with the 2020 IPM Updates.  A journey of a year starts with one week, right?

 

Speaking of resolutions, did you get a 2019 Census of Horticultural Specialties to fill out?  Please do as the information is very helpful to us in determining the research and education that is helpful to growers.  You can get an online copy, see FAQs and read what was found in previous surveys here.  Feb 5 is the deadline!

 

Bees have been used to deliver biopesticides in greenhouse crops (Flying Doctors from Biobest), but now there is researchthat suggests that beneficial mites like Swirskii and Cucumeris can deliver Beauveria bombs (an entomopathogenic fungus – say that 3 times fast) to thrips on foliage.  It isn’t a commercial product yet, but it might turn into one!

 

Application methods for biological controls evolve over time as we look for easier methods that maintain viability of the beneficials.  Bioline has a new blister pack system for Persimilis mites.  I’d like to see a mini drone for greenhouses (Toys, we need new toys!).

 

And speaking of toys, I mean, important equipment for your greenhouse – and it really is – do you know how to choose a pH/EC meter that works for you? e-GRO has an article on just that topic!

 

Confused about biostimulants?  I am but there is a useful new(ish) article out that explains them well.

 

Rutgers has a series of resistant cultivars and with the list is a lot of information on the research they are doing to make sure the resistance holds up.  They note that this resistance isn’t immunity but does delay the incidence of the disease so you need to consider an integrated system of management with good cultural practices to prevent the disease.

 

And here’s an E-Gro Edible Alert (do not lick your screen) on managing basil downy mildew in the greenhouse.

 

The sun is out and I am inspired to get out in it!  Have a great week!

 

January 21, 2020

Greenhouse vegetable IPM update 1.20.20

Working on that New Year’s resolution to get updates out more frequently!  So even one counts, right?  You have to start somewhere.

Powdery mildew on leafy greens can be an issue this time of year if ventilation is reduced and humidity levels rise.  Hort Americas has an article.

Looking for resistant varieties?  VegMD has a list – good for other crops and diseases, too.

Meg McGrath’s biopesticide list (Make sure they are labeled for greenhouse/high tunnel use.)

 

And a workshop on leafy greens, too! Extreme Season Extension of Salad Greens – January 25, 2020, 203 N. Hamilton St., Watertown NY – 1:00-3:00.  It’s FREE!

 

For a little extra flavor with that salad, how about downy mildew resistant basil?  Rutgers has a series of resistant cultivars and with the list is a lot of information on the research they are doing to make sure the resistance holds up.  They note that this resistance isn’t immunity but does delay the incidence of the disease so you need to consider an integrated system of management with good cultural practices to prevent the disease.

And here’s an E-Gro Edible Alert (do not lick your screen) on managing basil downy mildew in the greenhouse.

 

It’s a sunny day here and I hope it is for you, too!

 

Have a great week!

January 21, 2020

Christmas tree IPM update 1.15.20

Trying to get back in the swing of getting these announcements out more frequently.  Like New Year’s resolutions, if you do it once, it counts, right?

 

Michigan State is sponsoring another series of FREE webinars – all IPM topics!

If you register, you don’t have to watch the webinar at the time it is presented but can stream it on-demand afterwards.

 

For more information, click here.

Topics and dates:

Feb. 6: Scouting Christmas Trees: Tools for IPM
Speakers: Chloé Gendre, Club agroenvironnemental de l’Estrie, Quebec, Canada
Heidi Lindberg, Michigan State University Extension

Feb. 13: Disease Management in Christmas Trees
Speaker: Dr. Monique Sakalidis, Michigan State University

Feb. 20: Insect Management in Christmas Tree Production
Speaker: Howard Russell, Michigan State University Diagnostic Services

Feb. 27: Troubling shooting: Is it a pest?
Speaker: Dr. Bert Cregg, Michigan State Univerisity

 

Okay, I’ll start slow.  Wouldn’t want to sprain anything…..

 

Have a great week!

September 27, 2019

GDD update 9.27.19

Trying to get back on schedule – whatever that means!

 

We had some potentially exciting weather last night at the Beneficial Habitat Twilight meeting last night but most of it missed us!  It was nice to see some of you there!

 

We got a different viewpoint on some possible benefits of even those insects we consider pests from Jason Dombroskie, Cornell’s Insect Diagnostician – who has met few insects he didn’t like in some way.  That benefit might just be that they are food for insects that help control other insects.  We are learning a lot about what types of beneficial insects are in our habitat plots that might help control pests as we evaluate our samples.  Lots of ground beetles and hover flies.

 

And some good news on spotted lanternfly.  Some areas may not have sufficient GDD to allow completion of the life cycle.  Penn State is studying it now.  Hurray for GDD!

 

One of the things Maria van Dyke talked about last night is the Pesticide Decision-Making Guide to Protect Pollinators in Landscape, Ornamental and Turf Management.  It is available at the NYS IPM website at https://pollinator.cals.cornell.edu/sites/pollinator.cals.cornell.edu/files/shared/documents/Pesticide%20Decision%20Making%20Guide%20for%20Landscape,%20Ornamental%20and%20Turf%20Management_022619.pdf

 

And Amara Dunn did a great job of walking everyone through the plots.   You can live somewhat vicariously by checking out her blog Biocontrol Bytes. https://blogs.cornell.edu/biocontrolbytes/?s=habitat

(you can read all the posts if you take off the ?s=habitat at the end of the url)

And what should you be scouting?

Spruce spider mite – 2375- 2806 GDD

Doug fir needle midge – remove heavily infested trees (carefully so you don’t spread the pest) before larvae exit the needles (needles will turn brown). Mark infested trees for placing traps in the spring

Elongate hemlock scale – keep scouting for crawlers.

Cryptomeria scale crawlers – 1750-2130 GDD

Japanese beetle adults – 1029-2154 GDD

 

 

Wading River and Riverhead LIHREC have more GDD than anything on the list – but I think you might still do some scouting, just in case the insects don’t read the books.

Have a great week!

September 13, 2019

GDD update 9.12.19

Another cool day before more heat – and some of the growing degree day curves are starting to show a little slowing in increase.  And that means it is a good time to scout for spruce spider mite.  Tap some branches over a white paper plate and if something runs, smoosh it.  If it is small and leaves a dark green smear, it is probably a spruce spider mite (really scientific, right?).  While two spotted spider mites like it hot and dry, spruce spider mite likes it cool.  So even if you aren’t in the right GDD range, take a look.  The damage doesn’t disappear so sometimes interior bronzing is your clue, but it’s better to find them before you see that much damage.

 

You might see predatory mites, too.  Very small and fast and sometimes orangey.  They are good guys and help keep the bad ones under control. Unfortunately, the miticides you use to control the spruce spider mite also may kill the predatory mites so if you see both, scout over time and see if the numbers of bad guys are going down.  Then you don’t need to spray!

 

Ah, spiders – the bane of some growers existence.  Not that they are doing anything bad, it’s just the potential for their egg sacs to hatch out in people’s houses sending hundreds of babies up the walls. Not sure why that would bother anyone… Got my first picture of an egg mass this fall.  This one looked round and brown and papery but they do vary.  Usually some webbing holding it to the tree.  The grower is holding it in a jar to see if anything hatches out so we will see if I am right.

 

So what do you do?  There really isn’t anything to do but look carefully and shake the trees. I had a discussion with Dr. Raynor, the spider expert here, about creating alternative habitat so maybe I need to get back to that.

 

Hmm – it’s an all arachnid post.

 

Same old same old… not that we want more insect pests but a few could drop off the list….

 

Spruce spider mite – 2375- 2806 GDD

Doug fir needle midge – remove heavily infested trees (carefully so you don’t spread the pest) before larvae exit the needles (needles will turn brown). Mark infested trees for placing traps in the spring

Elongate hemlock scale – keep scouting for crawlers.

Cooley spruce gall adelgid – prune out galls on spruce before they turn brown (about 1850) – see other information on Cooley above

Cryptomeria scale crawlers – 1750-2130 GDD

Japanese beetle adults – 1029-2154 GDD

Two spotted spider mites– 1300-2000 GDD

Pine needle scale 2nd generation– 1290-1917 GDD

 

Have a great week!  Palindromic dates (same backwards and forwards) continue for a few more days!

 

September 5, 2019

GDD update 9.5.19

Sun on the lake!  I haven’t been in it yet as it is a little chilly…..but soon.  Sorry – that has nothing to do with Christmas trees.

 

Doing this email on GDD and pests has taught me a lot.  One thing is how confusing all the information can be.  My 2 main sources are the Cornell Tree and Shrub Guidelines (as we call it for short) and Pennsylvania IPM’s IPM for Christmas Tree Production.  And even with only 2 sources, there is confusion. Cooley Spruce gall adelgid fall treatment is a good example.  Admittedly, we are dealing with a pest with 2 hosts on which the insects behave somewhat differently and with a variety of pesticides.

 

Tree and Shrub says 1850-1950 GDD for fall control on spruce and 1500-1775 on Douglas fir, late fall for soil applications.

PA says 2800-3000 GDD for fall control of overwintering stages on their calendar.  In the specific chapters, it notes a single treatment in late September to early October for both Douglas fir and spruce to control exposed nymphs and immature females.  For spruce, it is recommended to treat after the first frost and that this is the most reliable time to treat.  Dormant oil for either species should be after the first frost when there is no active growth and the temperature is above freezing.   Depending on where you are, late Sept/early Oct and 2800-3000 might be the same time, but Long Island is predicted to break 3000 about Sept 10.

 

How do you figure out which is the right answer?  Trial and error sometimes.  And a little more research on my part.

 

The increase in GDD over the 5 day forecast is getting smaller it seems.  So there are not many changes in pest management.

 

Spruce spider mite – 2375- 2806 GDD

Doug fir needle midge – remove heavily infested trees (carefully so you don’t spread the pest) before larvae exit the needles (needles will turn brown). Mark infested trees for placing traps in the spring

Elongate hemlock scale – keep scouting for crawlers.

Cooley spruce gall adelgid – prune out galls on spruce before they turn brown (about 1850) – see other information on Cooley above

Cryptomeria scale crawlers – 1750-2130 GDD

Japanese beetle adults – 1029-2154 GDD

Two spotted spider mites– 1300-2000 GDD

Pine needle scale 2nd generation– 1290-1917 GDD

 

Have a great week!