March 10, 2017

Greenhouse IPM update 3.10.17

Snow again!  And since they removed the Cornus mas from outside my window, I don’t have that friendly reminder of swelling buds to tell me spring is coming.  But it is, I know it IS!

Check those fertilizer injectors!  Who wants to find out they aren’t working by having plants show symptoms – and then trying to figure out why!  Thomas Ford in eGro says from his work “75% of the fertilizer injectors employed by growers in are greenhouses are not working properly”. We’ve already heard of one case in NY. Lots of information here.

Get the key to locking out pests (my, that’s kind of a stretch but it is Friday).  Leeane Pundt at UConn has a great post on key plants and key pests to help you inspect new plant material coming in and scouting it once it’s in your greenhouse.

Another on scouting guidelines and biocontrol options for the most common insects and diseases found in greenhouse crops.

And since a picture is worth a thousand words…illustrated scouting tips for lots of crops
Ornamental crops
Vegetable bedding plants
Herb bedding plants
Herbaceous perennials
Identifying pests and beneficials on sticky cards
Go UConn!

Think (no) thrips!  UMass’ post on reviewing thrips biocontrol 

Webinars and more webinars…
Our series on high tunnel and greenhouse vegetable IPM continues to grow.  The most recent one was just posted!

OMAFRA’s greenhouse vegetable IPM specialist on Heating, Lighting and IPM
March 30, 2017
Using biofungicides, biostimulants, and biofertilizers to boost crop productivity and help manage vegetable diseases – not just greenhouse but perhaps still useful!

Bees are still in the news!  One study from England I read said that most varieties surveyed in garden centers were unattractive to pollinators (actually measuring the number of visits by pollinators at the garden center itself).  While still low, those with some notation as being friendly to bees had 4x as many visits.  Hopefully this listing would fare better –  Bee friendly trees and shrubs

Yes, but can they learn to dust?  Bees are smarter than we thought – or else maybe they are training us.  Hmmm….

Courage in the face of cold!  It will be warm again!

March 22, 2016

Greenhouse IPM Update 3.22.16

So they are saying snow but I am encouraged by the blooming of the tree outside my office window and the things that keep appearing at home!

There is just a TON of information out at the moment.  Let’s see if I can squeeze a lot in a small space here.

Greenhouse Product News’ Ornamental Disease Digest- Diseases by crop and lots of articles by Margery Daughtrey and Ann Chase – always edifying and entertaining.

It’s dinnertime but still –  “Edible Alerts’?  They are e-GRO’s list of information on topics relating to vegetables and herbs grown in the greenhouse and hydroponic production.  Things like basil fusarium wilt, greenhouse tomato diseases and disorders, and pythium on hydroponic lettuce.

And don’t forget the regular e-GRO alerts – this year we have already had some on black root rot (Thielaviopsis to those of you in the know who like to use lots of letters), scouting plug trays (you all do, right?) and aphids in hanging baskets.

We have a project on-going looking at aphid management and plant nutrition.  Overfertilized plants have more aphids, right?  Well maybe – but stay tuned.  Still, using controlled release fertilizers can help prevent waste of nutrients.  What do you know about them?  Check here for lots of information!

Do you know what Pycnanthemum is?  Pollinators don’t care what it is called, they just like it.  It keeps coming up on top in  pollinator ‘ taste trials’ – for NYS IPM trials and at Penn State, too.  I’ve already had requests for where it can be purchased! (psst – It’s mountain mint)

Do you know your pythium from your phytophthora?  It does matter when you want to control them.

A use for humidity?

I know you are all busy with the early spring so have a great week!