March 10, 2017

Greenhouse IPM update 3.10.17

Snow again!  And since they removed the Cornus mas from outside my window, I don’t have that friendly reminder of swelling buds to tell me spring is coming.  But it is, I know it IS!

Check those fertilizer injectors!  Who wants to find out they aren’t working by having plants show symptoms – and then trying to figure out why!  Thomas Ford in eGro says from his work “75% of the fertilizer injectors employed by growers in are greenhouses are not working properly”. We’ve already heard of one case in NY. Lots of information here.

Get the key to locking out pests (my, that’s kind of a stretch but it is Friday).  Leeane Pundt at UConn has a great post on key plants and key pests to help you inspect new plant material coming in and scouting it once it’s in your greenhouse.

Another on scouting guidelines and biocontrol options for the most common insects and diseases found in greenhouse crops.

And since a picture is worth a thousand words…illustrated scouting tips for lots of crops
Ornamental crops
Vegetable bedding plants
Herb bedding plants
Herbaceous perennials
Identifying pests and beneficials on sticky cards
Go UConn!

Think (no) thrips!  UMass’ post on reviewing thrips biocontrol 

Webinars and more webinars…
Our series on high tunnel and greenhouse vegetable IPM continues to grow.  The most recent one was just posted!

OMAFRA’s greenhouse vegetable IPM specialist on Heating, Lighting and IPM
March 30, 2017
Using biofungicides, biostimulants, and biofertilizers to boost crop productivity and help manage vegetable diseases – not just greenhouse but perhaps still useful!

Bees are still in the news!  One study from England I read said that most varieties surveyed in garden centers were unattractive to pollinators (actually measuring the number of visits by pollinators at the garden center itself).  While still low, those with some notation as being friendly to bees had 4x as many visits.  Hopefully this listing would fare better –  Bee friendly trees and shrubs

Yes, but can they learn to dust?  Bees are smarter than we thought – or else maybe they are training us.  Hmmm….

Courage in the face of cold!  It will be warm again!

September 13, 2016

Greenhouse IPM update 9.13.16

Ah, long falls – the climatic type, not the tripping down stairs type – and Indian summer….

I’ll start out with something just for pretty – we are (all?) plant geeks after all –
You can come visit the new conservatory when you are on campus!

Those new WPS rules – need help?  DEC is running some mock WPS inspections in October to help.  Oct 5 at Dickman Farms in Auburn, 9:30-12:00. No registration fee and no need to pre-register.  2 DEC credits for 1a, 1d, 10, 21, 22, 23, 24 and 25.  Oct 19 in Riverhead and Oct 26th in Lockport. Let me know if you need more information.

ProMix/Premier Tech Grower Videos – some useful topics like roles of nutrients in plant growth, calibrating pH and EC meters, and how to determine if your media is too old.

Tunnel Vision – what’s going on in tunnels these days?
Need something different in your high tunnels or greenhouses?  Try TunnelBerries (not sure if that is a great marketing name…).  Production guides, economics, and how to build and even recycle the plastic from tunnels.  (Check out the blog and you can find Cornell’s Marvin Pritts pictured)

And the University of Kentucky has a new IPM Scouting Guide for High Tunnel and Greenhouse Vegetable Crops.

September is flying by – still have plants to get in the garden!

Have a great week!

August 31, 2016

Greenhouse IPM Update 8.31.16

Life on the lake…..ahhh.  Even though I am (really, I am) working.

A virus to watch out for – tomato spotted wilt in chrysanthemums.  The MSU article won’t connect but here it is via Floradaily.  And so you have lots of pictures – here and here.

Yet another pest to keep an eye out for.  Pepper weevil We don’t have too many greenhouse pepper growers in NYS that I know of but it is a pest in the greenhouse pepper industry in Leamington ON – not that far away.

And while we are at it – insects AND chrysanthemums – Chrysanthemum aphid.

Lettuce be clear – growing greenhouse greens year ‘round requires lots of environmental monitoring.  A nice article with information from Neil Mattson.

Do the dew! Learn how to calculate a dew point and how it might affect disease incidence in your greenhouse. An article and a webinar Sept 8.  (I hadn’t hear of Upstart University which is online and for profit but might have some good information.)

How often do you hear this question: Are you keeping your bumblebees cool enoughLearn how to answer it.

Keeping things warm – solar/thermal greenhouse heating.  When I met Rob Hastings he said his first year farming there was a frost in almost every month.  So he understands the need for alternative methods.

There’s more but I save it so you can enjoy the day…

March 22, 2016

Greenhouse IPM Update 1.17.16

How the email piles up!  But lots of good stuff in there, even if I think of just deleting them all and starting over.  Is that Spring Cleaning?

Webinars for everyone – from E–GRO
January 22 – Managing Nutrient Solutions for Hydroponic Leafy Greens and Herbs is full but contact Brian Whipker for more information: bwhipker@ncsu.edu

January 29, 11-2 Eastern time – PGR University: Cutting Edge PGR Webinar https://attendee.gototraining.com/r/4737168154709094146
February 5 – 2–3 Eastern time – Blisters, Bumps and Lesions: What we know about the physiological disorders of intumescence and edema

There is much more to find at the e-GRO website –  Videos, research, alerts . . .

Want your education face to face? Plant Nutrition for Greenhouse Crops: On-site Media Testing, Feb 16, Sturbridge MA.  Click here for more information
How nice!  Handouts and information from previous events are all collected in one site,   And note the buttons for Fact Sheets, Publications and Resources, etc.

Got drips running down the back of your neck when you are in the greenhouse?  Here’s the article for you. Reducing Humidity in the Greenhouse

And that relates to botrytis and how to manage it!

Moisture levels even matter in space!

Ten ‘easy’ steps to greenhouse sanitation – NOW is the time to do it if you haven’t already.

And something else to clean in case you didn’t do it yet – how to winterize your sprayer – even if winter doesn’t really happen in your greenhouse

There may be no such thing as a free lunch but MSU has FREE Pest Scouting Bulletins to download – including Greenhouse.

And one on Commercially Available Biological Control Agents for Common Greenhouse Insect Pests!

Really being prepared!  Northeast Greenhouse Conference and Expo – November 9-10 in Boxborough, MA.

Keeping hydroponic roots happy!  Temperature, oxygen levels and beneficial microbes at optimum levels helps.

Stay warm and cuddled up to your computer watching webinars!  Have a great week!  Maybe even get out to one of the many greenhouse educational meetings this month!

March 22, 2016

Greenhouse IPM Update 3.22.16

So they are saying snow but I am encouraged by the blooming of the tree outside my office window and the things that keep appearing at home!

There is just a TON of information out at the moment.  Let’s see if I can squeeze a lot in a small space here.

Greenhouse Product News’ Ornamental Disease Digest- Diseases by crop and lots of articles by Margery Daughtrey and Ann Chase – always edifying and entertaining.

It’s dinnertime but still –  “Edible Alerts’?  They are e-GRO’s list of information on topics relating to vegetables and herbs grown in the greenhouse and hydroponic production.  Things like basil fusarium wilt, greenhouse tomato diseases and disorders, and pythium on hydroponic lettuce.

And don’t forget the regular e-GRO alerts – this year we have already had some on black root rot (Thielaviopsis to those of you in the know who like to use lots of letters), scouting plug trays (you all do, right?) and aphids in hanging baskets.

We have a project on-going looking at aphid management and plant nutrition.  Overfertilized plants have more aphids, right?  Well maybe – but stay tuned.  Still, using controlled release fertilizers can help prevent waste of nutrients.  What do you know about them?  Check here for lots of information!

Do you know what Pycnanthemum is?  Pollinators don’t care what it is called, they just like it.  It keeps coming up on top in  pollinator ‘ taste trials’ – for NYS IPM trials and at Penn State, too.  I’ve already had requests for where it can be purchased! (psst – It’s mountain mint)

Do you know your pythium from your phytophthora?  It does matter when you want to control them.

A use for humidity?

I know you are all busy with the early spring so have a great week!