February 5, 2019

Greenhouse IPM update 2.5.19

Ahh, pretend spring!  I’m enjoying every minute!

Botrytis on overwintering crops – it’s a sneaky one.  Yes, it likes temperatures in the 70’s – who doesn’t?  (not much higher, though).  But UC Davis says ‘temperatures near 32 F will retard but not completely stop the development of gray mold.’  High humidity and free water are also necessary for the disease to progress.  So it could be lurking there waiting for a chance to sneak out.  So keep an eye on the overwintered stock, keep relative humidity below 75%, and keep the air circulating!

UMD Extension suggests starting ornamental pepper plants now if you want them as banker plants for Orius in March or when the day length is long enough in your area – about 12 hours of light.  They need to be flowering when you apply the Orius so they can feed on the pollen.

Couldn’t get to Maine, New Hampshire or Vermont for their terrific 2019 IPM Workshops? (you really should go some year) You can get the materials presented on-line at https://www.uvm.edu/~entlab/Greenhouse%20IPM/Workshops/2019/IPMWorkshop2019.html  It’s going to get cold again so you’ll need something to read….

January 18, 2019

Greenhouse IPM update 1.18.19

Things to consider while you are waiting for the snow to start!

If you bring in plant material from Florida – or anywhere really – you should look it over closely to make sure that you are not bringing in any pest insects.  A new aphid has been found in Florida on aluminum plant that can also affect other Pilea spp – the Pilea aphid.  It is very small and bicolored in the adult stage.  More information here:

Yet another invasive species – the spotted lanternfly – is definitely on the move.  Several adults have been found in NYS – including on nursery stock – but so far – and thanks to good inspection – no populations have been found.  To learn how to identify it and prevent its spread, watch our webinars (in conjunction with NE IPM and the Department of Ag and Markets.

  • Spotted Lanternfly Basics for Hops, Berry, and Vegetable Growers (Feb. 26, 2019, 10:00 a.m.)
  • Spotted Lanternfly Basics for Grape and Apple Industries (Feb. 26, 2019, 1:00 p.m.)
  • Spotted Lanternfly Basics for Christmas Tree Growers (Mar. 4, 2019, 10:00 a.m.)
  • Spotted Lanternfly Basics for Nursery, Greenhouse, and Landscape Industries (Mar. 4, 2019, 1:00 p.m.)

For more information and registration links, go here:

Looking for the Ornamental Team?  We try to keep our events listing updated here

March 7, 2018

Greenhouse vegetable IPM update 3.7.18

I’d like to be in a warm steamy greenhouse today! My first greenhouse visit was on Monday – makes me believe spring will come!

Podcast by Jud Reid (and others) on Better Greenhouse Practices  And if you scroll down the list of podcasts there are others that might apply

Vegetable varieties with genetic resistance to insects or diseases –in Vegetable MD Online.  Not specifically aimed at greenhouse production but a good resource that Meg McGrath is keeping up!

Interesting article on the impact of entomopathogenic fungi on natural enemies 

This is pretty cool – on–site molecular detection of soil-borne pathogens. Instant verification of a disease?

In looking for information on trap cropping for cucumber beetles, I found this presentation on biological control of cuke beetles in the field.

 

February 16, 2018

Greenhouse IPM update 2.16.18

Did you miss me? I was in India for 3 weeks – quite the experience! I did get to a flower market and saw HUGE numbers of marigolds strung into garlands used for religious and decorative reasons. I guess that isn’t really work!

Broad mites – ugh! Hard to see and cause leaf curling and worse. At the meeting in WNY this week an alarming number of people said they had seen them (or the damage they cause) and the incidence seems to be increasing. Probably why the GGS Pro Tech Tip is on broad mites this week.  Also, Dan Gilrein’s article in Greenhouse Management from 2009 (always ahead of the curve, is Dan).  Remember to make sure suggested pesticides are labeled for NYS.

Planning on having thrips? A 6 part series of videos and articles from Greenhouseipm.org walks you through thrips IPM so you can plan not to have thrips.

WPS training requirements have changed. Be sure you know what is required in terms of who can do the training and how it must be presented.  Lots of resources are available from the Pesticide Educational Resources Collaborative  including the appropriate training videos

Feeling like a trip yourselves? Several meetings in Canada coming up.
Vineland Ontario Feb 23 – Greenhouse IPM: Achieving Sustainable Biocontrol

Thiel’s Greenhouse, Bruderheim Alberta Feb 28 – Beyond Sticky Traps: Leveling up your greenhouse biocontrol

The 2018 Cornell Pest Management Guide for Commercial Production and Maintenance of Trees and Shrubs is available now! Print and online available from the Cornell Bookstore.

January 16, 2018

Greenhouse IPM Update 1.16.18

 

Nora’s e-GRO blog post on Bacterial leaf spot and blight – in case you need more information!

Can you tell the difference between a shore fly and a fungus gnat? Do you need to know? It sure helps if you want to control them. Griffin has a new fact sheet on them (just remember to check if listed pesticides are allowed in NYS). Keep scrolling down and you get to information on biological control!

Michigan State has 5 things to consider while gearing up for Spring 2018 – and most of them are IPM – hooray!

And another post on managing substrate pH in soilless substrates – be prepared!

Want to know more about lighting? Check out GLASE (such a clever acronym!)