March 7, 2018

Greenhouse vegetable IPM update 3.7.18

I’d like to be in a warm steamy greenhouse today! My first greenhouse visit was on Monday – makes me believe spring will come!

Podcast by Jud Reid (and others) on Better Greenhouse Practices  And if you scroll down the list of podcasts there are others that might apply

Vegetable varieties with genetic resistance to insects or diseases –in Vegetable MD Online.  Not specifically aimed at greenhouse production but a good resource that Meg McGrath is keeping up!

Interesting article on the impact of entomopathogenic fungi on natural enemies 

This is pretty cool – on–site molecular detection of soil-borne pathogens. Instant verification of a disease?

In looking for information on trap cropping for cucumber beetles, I found this presentation on biological control of cuke beetles in the field.

 

February 16, 2018

Greenhouse IPM update 2.16.18

Did you miss me? I was in India for 3 weeks – quite the experience! I did get to a flower market and saw HUGE numbers of marigolds strung into garlands used for religious and decorative reasons. I guess that isn’t really work!

Broad mites – ugh! Hard to see and cause leaf curling and worse. At the meeting in WNY this week an alarming number of people said they had seen them (or the damage they cause) and the incidence seems to be increasing. Probably why the GGS Pro Tech Tip is on broad mites this week.  Also, Dan Gilrein’s article in Greenhouse Management from 2009 (always ahead of the curve, is Dan).  Remember to make sure suggested pesticides are labeled for NYS.

Planning on having thrips? A 6 part series of videos and articles from Greenhouseipm.org walks you through thrips IPM so you can plan not to have thrips.

WPS training requirements have changed. Be sure you know what is required in terms of who can do the training and how it must be presented.  Lots of resources are available from the Pesticide Educational Resources Collaborative  including the appropriate training videos

Feeling like a trip yourselves? Several meetings in Canada coming up.
Vineland Ontario Feb 23 – Greenhouse IPM: Achieving Sustainable Biocontrol

Thiel’s Greenhouse, Bruderheim Alberta Feb 28 – Beyond Sticky Traps: Leveling up your greenhouse biocontrol

The 2018 Cornell Pest Management Guide for Commercial Production and Maintenance of Trees and Shrubs is available now! Print and online available from the Cornell Bookstore.

January 16, 2018

Greenhouse IPM Update 1.16.18

 

Nora’s e-GRO blog post on Bacterial leaf spot and blight – in case you need more information!

Can you tell the difference between a shore fly and a fungus gnat? Do you need to know? It sure helps if you want to control them. Griffin has a new fact sheet on them (just remember to check if listed pesticides are allowed in NYS). Keep scrolling down and you get to information on biological control!

Michigan State has 5 things to consider while gearing up for Spring 2018 – and most of them are IPM – hooray!

And another post on managing substrate pH in soilless substrates – be prepared!

Want to know more about lighting? Check out GLASE (such a clever acronym!)

January 7, 2018

Greenhouse IPM Update 1.7.18

My New Year’s resolution is to get these updates out regularly. Every resolution starts with one step, right?

Lots of education happening this month! We’ll all be geniuses!

Long Island Ag Forum – January 10-11, Riverhead Click to register

Capital District Bedding Plant Conference – January 11, 8-4 in Troy

2018 Empire State Producers Expo – January 16-18 in Syracuse – tons of sessions including Greenhouse and Cut Flower

Long Island Greenhouse and Floriculture Conference – January 16 Riverhead

If you want to travel a bit – 2018 Tri-State Greenhouse IPM Workshop registration until Jan 10
Jan 17- Manchester ME
Jan 18 – Durham NH
Jan 19 Burlington VT
It’s always a great meeting!

Coming in February:
Western NY Bedding Plant School – February 13, East Aurora

Hudson Valley Nursery and Greenhouse School – February 27
More information coming soon!

 

Don’t want to leave that warm corner of the sofa? Free e-GRO webinars starting January 19– nutrient monitoring, plant growth regulators ( I like that there is one on overdoses and getting back on track as we seem to see at least one of those every year) and lighting for ornamentals and edibles.

In-House Nutrient Monitoring

January 19, 2018
12:00 to 1:00 pm Eastern Time

PGR University: Focus on Perennials

January 25, 2018
12:00 noon to 1:00 pm Eastern Time

PGR University: Focus on Annuals

January 26, 2018
12:00 noon to 1:00 pm Eastern Time

Photoperiodic Responses and Lighting Strategies of Ornamental and Edible Crops

February 2, 2018
12:00 noon to 1:30 pm Eastern Time

If you know of some I have forgotten, send them along!

Now that we have survived the cyclone bomb, it’s time to get moving! Have a great week!

January 7, 2018

Pest Alert – Xanthomonas leaf spot in begonia

New year and another reason for good scouting!

You have probably heard about Xanthomonas leaf spot in begonia cuttings. Plantpeddler (with help from Margery Daughtrey so you know it is good) put out guidelines on recognizing and managing the disease. This is another of those diseases where identification and quick (and careful) removal from the greenhouse are important in reducing the losses. You can’t cure it once you have it in a plant but you CAN reduce new infections.

A greenhouse wouldn’t be a bad place to be today, so get out and get scouting!

June 23, 2017

First lily leaf beetle parasitoids released in NYS

Ever notice how revolting adolescents can become beautiful adults . . .  in the insect world, of course. (And revolting is the word in this case, as the larvae cover themselves with excrement.)

However, even those beautiful Lily leaf beetle (LLB) adults have the bad habit of feeding on your lily leaves – and getting started as soon as the leaves emerge above the soil.  And they like all true lilies and fritillaria (daylilies are safe).  When the eggs hatch, the larvae join in on the feast.  In some areas, it has become almost impossible to grow lilies!

But don’t give up!  Help is on the way!  The University of Rhode Island Biocontrol Laboratory has tested several tiny wasps that lay eggs in the LLB larvae and tried them out in several New England states.  Luckily, the wasps have set up house and spread from their release sites.  It’s not a quick fix but every little bit helps.

NYS IPM’s Brian Eshenaur is coordinating a project to release the beneficial wasps around NYS (don’t worry, they don’t sting) in coordination with several county Extension offices.  The first release was this week and we are excited to learn if they parasitize the larvae and then spread.  Maybe to a lily bed near you – so you can enjoy growing lilies again.

It’s almost enough to make you appreciate those beautiful beetles . . .

(Richard A. Casagrande, University of Rhode Island, Bugwood.org)