January 21, 2020

Greenhouse IPM Update 1.20.20

Trying to start out on the right foot with the 2020 IPM Updates.  A journey of a year starts with one week, right?

 

Speaking of resolutions, did you get a 2019 Census of Horticultural Specialties to fill out?  Please do as the information is very helpful to us in determining the research and education that is helpful to growers.  You can get an online copy, see FAQs and read what was found in previous surveys here.  Feb 5 is the deadline!

 

Bees have been used to deliver biopesticides in greenhouse crops (Flying Doctors from Biobest), but now there is researchthat suggests that beneficial mites like Swirskii and Cucumeris can deliver Beauveria bombs (an entomopathogenic fungus – say that 3 times fast) to thrips on foliage.  It isn’t a commercial product yet, but it might turn into one!

 

Application methods for biological controls evolve over time as we look for easier methods that maintain viability of the beneficials.  Bioline has a new blister pack system for Persimilis mites.  I’d like to see a mini drone for greenhouses (Toys, we need new toys!).

 

And speaking of toys, I mean, important equipment for your greenhouse – and it really is – do you know how to choose a pH/EC meter that works for you? e-GRO has an article on just that topic!

 

Confused about biostimulants?  I am but there is a useful new(ish) article out that explains them well.

 

Rutgers has a series of resistant cultivars and with the list is a lot of information on the research they are doing to make sure the resistance holds up.  They note that this resistance isn’t immunity but does delay the incidence of the disease so you need to consider an integrated system of management with good cultural practices to prevent the disease.

 

And here’s an E-Gro Edible Alert (do not lick your screen) on managing basil downy mildew in the greenhouse.

 

The sun is out and I am inspired to get out in it!  Have a great week!

 

January 21, 2020

Greenhouse vegetable IPM update 1.20.20

Working on that New Year’s resolution to get updates out more frequently!  So even one counts, right?  You have to start somewhere.

Powdery mildew on leafy greens can be an issue this time of year if ventilation is reduced and humidity levels rise.  Hort Americas has an article.

Looking for resistant varieties?  VegMD has a list – good for other crops and diseases, too.

Meg McGrath’s biopesticide list (Make sure they are labeled for greenhouse/high tunnel use.)

 

And a workshop on leafy greens, too! Extreme Season Extension of Salad Greens – January 25, 2020, 203 N. Hamilton St., Watertown NY – 1:00-3:00.  It’s FREE!

 

For a little extra flavor with that salad, how about downy mildew resistant basil?  Rutgers has a series of resistant cultivars and with the list is a lot of information on the research they are doing to make sure the resistance holds up.  They note that this resistance isn’t immunity but does delay the incidence of the disease so you need to consider an integrated system of management with good cultural practices to prevent the disease.

And here’s an E-Gro Edible Alert (do not lick your screen) on managing basil downy mildew in the greenhouse.

 

It’s a sunny day here and I hope it is for you, too!

 

Have a great week!

February 5, 2019

Greenhouse IPM update 2.5.19

Ahh, pretend spring!  I’m enjoying every minute!

Botrytis on overwintering crops – it’s a sneaky one.  Yes, it likes temperatures in the 70’s – who doesn’t?  (not much higher, though).  But UC Davis says ‘temperatures near 32 F will retard but not completely stop the development of gray mold.’  High humidity and free water are also necessary for the disease to progress.  So it could be lurking there waiting for a chance to sneak out.  So keep an eye on the overwintered stock, keep relative humidity below 75%, and keep the air circulating!

UMD Extension suggests starting ornamental pepper plants now if you want them as banker plants for Orius in March or when the day length is long enough in your area – about 12 hours of light.  They need to be flowering when you apply the Orius so they can feed on the pollen.

Couldn’t get to Maine, New Hampshire or Vermont for their terrific 2019 IPM Workshops? (you really should go some year) You can get the materials presented on-line at https://www.uvm.edu/~entlab/Greenhouse%20IPM/Workshops/2019/IPMWorkshop2019.html  It’s going to get cold again so you’ll need something to read….

January 18, 2019

Greenhouse IPM update 1.18.19

Things to consider while you are waiting for the snow to start!

If you bring in plant material from Florida – or anywhere really – you should look it over closely to make sure that you are not bringing in any pest insects.  A new aphid has been found in Florida on aluminum plant that can also affect other Pilea spp – the Pilea aphid.  It is very small and bicolored in the adult stage.  More information here:

Yet another invasive species – the spotted lanternfly – is definitely on the move.  Several adults have been found in NYS – including on nursery stock – but so far – and thanks to good inspection – no populations have been found.  To learn how to identify it and prevent its spread, watch our webinars (in conjunction with NE IPM and the Department of Ag and Markets.

  • Spotted Lanternfly Basics for Hops, Berry, and Vegetable Growers (Feb. 26, 2019, 10:00 a.m.)
  • Spotted Lanternfly Basics for Grape and Apple Industries (Feb. 26, 2019, 1:00 p.m.)
  • Spotted Lanternfly Basics for Christmas Tree Growers (Mar. 4, 2019, 10:00 a.m.)
  • Spotted Lanternfly Basics for Nursery, Greenhouse, and Landscape Industries (Mar. 4, 2019, 1:00 p.m.)

For more information and registration links, go here:

Looking for the Ornamental Team?  We try to keep our events listing updated here

March 7, 2018

Greenhouse vegetable IPM update 3.7.18

I’d like to be in a warm steamy greenhouse today! My first greenhouse visit was on Monday – makes me believe spring will come!

Podcast by Jud Reid (and others) on Better Greenhouse Practices  And if you scroll down the list of podcasts there are others that might apply

Vegetable varieties with genetic resistance to insects or diseases –in Vegetable MD Online.  Not specifically aimed at greenhouse production but a good resource that Meg McGrath is keeping up!

Interesting article on the impact of entomopathogenic fungi on natural enemies 

This is pretty cool – on–site molecular detection of soil-borne pathogens. Instant verification of a disease?

In looking for information on trap cropping for cucumber beetles, I found this presentation on biological control of cuke beetles in the field.