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Medieval Epidemics

Diffusions of disease through social networks is a major public health concern, especially as the world’s population increases each and traveling navigating various networks is popular. The bubonic plague, commonly known as the black death, has claimed up to 200 million lives – peaking in Europe mid 14th century. This pandemic is believed to have been spread via animal agents by way of fleas, fluid contamination, and even inhalation. The popularity of sea rats that hid away on trading ships and the lack of sterilized care facilities aided in the success of the bubonic plague. The network of disease is a complicated on as some diseases, like black death, never really go away. Even if an infected node is deceased they area that they inhabited may have remnants of the disease. Furthermore, viruses virile nature challenges modern medicine and research by evolving in reaction to the environment and becoming immune to antibiotics. Thankfully, today’s technology enables us to isolate areas affected by disease and help them accordingly.

 


http://www.history.com/topics/black-death

http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/the-mutant-genes-behind-the-black-death/

http://outbreaknewstoday.com/madagascar-reports-two-bubonic-plague-deaths-in-miarinarivo-41674/

http://www.historyextra.com/feature/your-60-second-guide-facts-black-death-how-when-why

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