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Volume 13 Number 17

View from the Field

Northern Corn Leaf Blight:

There are a lot of reports of northern corn leaf blight infections across the state this week. This is a disease we have seen over that last several years in NY. In some cases it has caused yield losses. There are currently no specific thresholds for northern corn leaf blight on field corn. It is recommended that you scout fields for the disease from V14 to the R1 stage. If you have an infection that is at or above the ear leaf you might get an economic return from a fungicide application. The importance is to protect to ear leaf and above during the reproductive stages to prevent yield losses if there is an infection present. It is unclear if there is an economic return to spraying after the R1 stage. Make sure to watch the weather to see if the conditions will be conducive for the disease to develop and spread up the plant. Warm and moist weather favors northern corn leaf blight, while rain and/or wind can carry the spores. REMEMBER, if there is no disease there is NO reason to spray a fungicide. Northern corn leaf blight shows up as a gray-green or tan cigar-shaped lesion 1 to 6 inches long. Source: Northern Corn Leaf Blight

northern corn leaf blight

northern corn leaf blight

Northern Corn Leaf Spot

Kevin Ganoe (CCE Central NY Dairy and Field Crops Team) is the first to report finding northern corn leaf spot in field corn this season.  The symptoms are linear narrow lesion about a 1/8 to ¼ inch wide. They range from a ½ to ¾ inches long. They are grayish-tan and have a pigmented border. The lesions exist between the veins and are linear in appearance. The fungus is Bipolaris zeicola (Helminthosporium carbonum) and has five different races that can infect the plant. The fungus overwinters on corn crop residue from previous years.

 

Northern Corn Leaf Spot

Northern Corn Leaf Spot

Management of Northern Corn Leaf Spot.

  1. Plant corn hybrids that are resistant to Northern Corn Leaf Spot
  2. Use a shorter rotation of 1 to 2 years for corn
  3. Plow under residue to reduce fungi in the field.
  4. Fungicides are effective at controlling the disease but is rarely economical

White Mold on Soybeans

The second week in a row we have reports of white mold in soybeans. White mold is the most serious disease of soybeans in NY. Control is difficult and you can have yield losses with this disease. For more information on white mold in soybeans please refer to last week’s article: White Mold on Soybeans

Soybean Aphid

Justin O’Dea (CCE Ulster County) reports increasing levels of soybean aphid in soybeans. In two fields it ranged from 50 aphids per plant to 225 aphids per plant. The plants were in the last R5 stage of development. Once soybeans reach the R6 spraying for soybean aphids is not economical.

Western Bean Cutworm

Keith Waldron reports that  western bean cutworm larvae have been found in corn in western NY.  Eric Nixon crop consultant (WNYCMA) is seeing 1 larvae/husk and as many as 5. Corn fields should be checked for presence of western bean cutworm larvae. Particularly those fields with high numbers of western bean cutworm larvae moths collected.   For more information see article below.

Weather Outlook – August 28, 2014

NOAA Northeast Regional Climate Center, Cornell University

Jessica Spaccio (Rennells)

 Last week temperatures ranged from 2 degrees below normal to 4 degrees above normal. Precipitation ranged from a trace to over 3’.  Base 50 growing degree-days ranged from 80 to 140. High pressure will bring dry but cooler weather for the next two days.  The holiday weekend will warm up but bring a chance for showers and thunderstorms. Today will be partly sunny with temperatures throughout the 70’s. Overnight temperatures will be in the mid 40’s to low 50’s. Friday will be sunny with highs in the 70’s.  Low temperatures will be in the upper 50’s to low 60’s. Saturday will be partly sunny with a chance for showers and thunderstorms, highs will be in the low to mid 80’s.  Overnight temperatures will be in the low to mid 60’s. Sunday will be mostly cloudy with showers and thunderstorms likely, highs will range from the mid 70’s to mid 80’s.  Overnight temperatures will be in the upper 50’s to mid 60’s. Monday will be mostly cloudy with scattered showers and thunderstorms, highs will be in the mid 70’s to low 80’s. Overnight temperatures will be in the upper 50’s to low 60’s. Tuesday will be partly sunny with scattered showers and thunderstorms with highs in the low to mid 80’s.  Lows will be in the 60’s. Wednesday’s highs will be in the upper 70’s to low 80’s with a chance for showers and thunderstorms.  Lows will be in the 60’s. The five-day precipitation amounts will range from 1/10 ” to ½ ” ; 7-day amounts will range from ¼  ” to ¾ ”.The 8-14 day outlook (Sept 4-10) is showing above normal temperatures and above normal precipitation. The three-month outlook for Sept/Oct/Nov is showing above normal temperatures and equal chances for precipitation.

Maps of 8-14 day outlooks

National Weather Service watch/warnings map

NRCC Drought Page which features the US Drought Monitor map (updated every Thursday)

 

Western Bean Cutworm Update (8.27.14):

Keith Waldron, NYS IPM

Western bean cutworm catches have dropped from last week’s 1330 WBC moths collected

(average of 23 WBC / trap) to 65 (1.3 WBC / trap) this week. Half of the fifty sites reporting this week did not collect any WBC moths. A total of 9718 WBC moths have been collected this season compared to 5843 last season. WBC larvae have been reported in corn in western NY. Locations where moth counts have reached or exceeded an accumulation of 100 moths per trap should be monitored for presence of WBC larvae. Recall that multiple WBC larvae may be found in corn ears. Pictures of WBC larvae and look-a-like larvae can be found at: http://www.cornpest.ca/index.cfm/wbc-trap-network/wbc-scouting-and-training-material-presentations/wbc-and-its-look-alikes/

 

Western Bean Cutworm Trap Catch – NYS 2014.

6/29

7/6

7/13

7/20

7/27

8/3

8/10

8/17

8/24

Traps Reporting

43

62

66

59

65

63

57

58

50

WBC Total

0

8

56

356

2407

3085

2411

1330

65

Avg WBC / Trap

0.00

0.13

0.85

6.03

37.03

48.97

42.30

22.93

1.30

“0″ WBC

43

54

38

12

9

7

8

7

25

> 0 WBC

0

8

28

47

56

56

49

51

25

% Traps Catching

0.00%

12.90%

42.42%

79.66%

86.15%

88.89%

85.96%

87.93%

50.00%

Capture2_28

GDD_Aug27

2014 NYS Western Bean Cutworm Trap Catch Data by location.

 

County City

7/27   

8/3   

8/10   

8/17  

8/24  

  Total

Allegany Belmont

38

8

NA

0

NA

58

Allegany Caneadea

10

0

NA

2

NA

13

Cattaraugus Randolph

0

104

27

NA

4

135

Cayuga Auburn

5

NA

2

NA

NA

7

Cayuga Aurora

6

8

8

4

0

26

Chautauqua Clymer

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

0

Clinton Chazy

17

25

20

NA

NA

65

Columbia Valatie

3

8

4

3

0

19

Cortland Homer

9

2

NA

1

1

24

Delaware Oneonta

10

9

0

1

0

33

Delaware Walton

8

9

4

2

0

25

Dutchess Amenia

1

2

0

0

0

3

Dutchess Amenia/Millbrook

2

6

0

1

NA

10

Essex Willsboro

45

32

14

NA

NA

109

Franklin Bangor

4

251

165

72

3

505

Franklin Malone

73

27

164

78

6

350

Franklin Moira

85

222

81

49

1

442

Genesee Stafford

26

14

9

4

1

60

Jefferson Calcium

31

125

37

31

1

226

Jefferson Chaumont

59

41

30

23

0

165

Jefferson Ellisburg

0

26

16

10

1

53

Jefferson Evans Mills

28

49

12

87

1

179

Jefferson Hounsfield

162

153

116

137

7

603

Jefferson Plessis

62

47

18

19

0

161

Jefferson Rodman

2

23

8

11

1

46

Jefferson Rutland

2

53

375

158

3

592

Lewis Croghan

248

133

72

25

0

485

Lewis Denmark

63

61

33

37

0

198

Lewis Harrisburg

28

68

141

24

5

283

Lewis Lowville

45

15

21

45

2

131

Lewis Martinsburg

134

101

49

43

0

336

Lewis Turin

79

83

76

25

2

279

Lewis Turin

57

35

42

8

0

145

Livingston Caledonia

1

1

1

3

0

6

Livingston Groveland

0

4

7

3

1

15

Monroe Hamlin

80

105

20

61

NA

291

Monroe Spencerport

2

0

11

11

0

32

Montgomery Palatine Bridge

56

37

16

9

0

126

Niagara Barker

96

102

106

NA

NA

311

Oneida Clinton

4

2

0

NA

NA

6

Onondaga Tully

0

0

0

0

0

0

Ontario Farmington

12

7

NA

2

NA

26

Ontario Geneva

16

27

NA

4

3

57

Ontario Hopewell

10

10

9

6

1

55

Orange Warwick

0

0

0

1

0

4

Orleans Kendall

36

44

18

21

NA

126

Rensselaer Brunswick

0

4

NA

0

0

4

Schuyler Valois

42

64

43

3

3

169

St .Lawrence Heuvelton

70

61

2

2

0

137

St .Lawrence Madrid

111

75

19

19

0

227

St. Lawrence

Lawrence

152

344

372

127

4

1018

St. Lawrence Morristown

32

83

60

53

2

234

St. Lawrence Parishville

68

116

37

19

3

244

St. Lawrence Waddington

29

20

4

4

0

57

Steuben Wayland

26

15

8

11

0

74

Steuben Wayland

2

NA

9

NA

NA

11

Suffolk Riverhead

0

0

1

0

0

2

Tompkins Varna

23

18

17

9

3

82

Ulster New Paltz

0

2

0

0

0

3

Ulster New Paltz

1

0

0

3

0

5

Washington Easton

14

7

14

6

0

51

Wayne Alloway

2

7

NA

5

NA

14

Wayne Lyons

0

0

NA

0

NA

0

Wayne Willliamson

23

29

14

4

NA

74

Wyoming Attica

118

117

65

40

4

386

Wyoming Wyoming

39

44

14

4

2

105

Total

9718

Clipboard Checklist

Keith Waldron, NYS IPM

General

*Walk fields to check general field condition, weed or other issues

*Watch for crop maturity, stand assessments, weed escapes, lodging issues

 Alfalfa:

*Evaluate established legume stands for approximate days until harvest
*Monitor potato leafhopper
*Monitor new seedings for potato leafhopper, pythium blight, phytopthora root rot.
Small Grains:
*Monitor spring grain fields for growth stage, disease issues

Corn:

*Monitor for mid to late season corn pests including European corn borer, armyworm, corn rootworm larvae/adults, foliar diseases, weed issues, vertebrate (birds, deer) damage

 Soybeans:

*Conduct mid season pest assessment including soybean aphid, white mold and other diseases, weed issues, vertebrate damage

  Pastures:

*Check crop growth
*Review/Plan rotation system

*Check and mend fences as needed.

*Invasive species, plants harmful to livestock

Storage:

*Check grain storage bins for temperature, moisture and signs of mold and insects. Aerate, core, transfer grain or treat as necessary
*
Check forage allocation and anticipate feed program adjustments as forages from previous year are used up
*Plan where forages should be stored for optimum allocation next feeding season
*Mow around storage bins and facility to minimize pest hiding places

Dairy Cattle Barn Fly Management:

*Monitor animals and barn area for house fly, stable fly and other pest management needs including presence of rodents and birds.
*Check facilities for favorable fly breeding conditions: (organic matter + moisture): leaks in watering systems, roof gutters for leaks and potential overspill, drainage,
*Sanitation, sanitation, sanitation – clean animal resting areas, feed troughs, minimize source of moist organic matter i.e. fly breeding areas in barn and in adjacent animal loafing yard
* Continue fly monitoring: install “3X5″ index card fly speck monitoring cards throughout barn
*Use, replenish, replace fly management materials: sticky fly tapes/ribbons, insecticide baits, natural enemies (parasitoids), fly population monitoring (3 x 5) spot cards
*Consider purchase and release of Muscidifurax raptor and/or M. raptorellus natural enemies of house and stable fly pupae.

Dairy Cattle on Pasture:

*Monitor animals for presence of face flies, horn flies and stable flies. Action guidelines: face flies (average 10 per animal face), horn flies (average 50 / dairy per animal side, 200 / beef cattle per animal side), stable flies average 10 per animal (all four legs)
*Check feed bunk / water source locations for signs of stable fly breeding (moist undisturbed organic matter – spilled feed, round bales, etc.), minimize source of moist organic matter i.e. fly breeding areas in barn and in adjacent animal exercise yard.
*Check pasture for forage quality / quantity, rotate as appropriate
*Check pasture for vegetation poisonous to livestock
*Consider use of pasture fly traps to help reduce deer, horse and stable fly populations