The October 2014 issue of New York Berry News is now available online.

Highlights include:

  • NYS BGA to Host SWD Regional Workshops
  •  ”Going Bigger” is the Focus of the 2015 Empire Producers EXPO Berry Session
  • Educational Opportunities- Pawpaws and Grapes
  • PSU and Cornell Co-host Vegetable and Small Fruit Production Webinar Series
  • Vole Management in Berry Plantings
  • Joint Report on the North American Cranberry Industry
  • Getting Started with Berry Production and Marketing Course Offered
  • NYS BGA Welcomes New Communications Specialist
  • NARBA News: Awald Farms at 100 – Debby Wechsler
  • New Farmers Grant Fund
  • New York State Young Farmers Loan Forgiveness Program -Due Dec. 15
  • USDA Unveils Key New Programs to Help Farmers Manage Risk
  • USDA Invests Nearly $118 Million to Support America’s Specialty Crop Producers
  • USDA Expands Access to Credit to Help More Beginning and Family Farmers
  • FSMA Updates
  • Biodegradable Bio-based Mulch Now Allowed for Organic Production
  • ANSI Peer Review Report
  • New Wildlife Damage Control Handbook
  • New Organic Farming Research Webinars
  • FarmNet – Help You Need, When You Need It
  • Pest’s Taste for Fine Wine May Prove Its Undoing
  • Update on Applied Berry Research in Eastern NY
  • Limiting Bird Damage in Fruit Crops

Making that move can be very profitable, but challenging – hear how!

Join commercial berry growers from across the state on Thursday January 22nd 2015 for a day-long commercial berry education session at the Empire State Producers EXPO held at the OnCenter in Syracuse, NY.Empire State Producers EXPO logo

Morning Berry Session, Thursday, January 22, 2014, 9 to 11 AM

This session is designed to whet your appetite for what promises to be a full day of commercial berry educational programming you won’t want to miss!

Consider expanding your berry operation by adding a new crop. One of the newer small fruit crops gaining acreage in NY as well as popularity is Juneberries. Dr. Erwin “Duke” Elsner, small fruit educator from Michigan State University will detail the basics of getting into Juneberry production and marketing, sharing insider how-to’s for this exciting new crop (via webinar).

Is organic blueberry growing on a large scale right for you? Dr. Bill Sciarappa, County Extension Dept. Head, and Agricultural Agent with Cooperative Extension of Monmouth County, Rutgers New Jersey Agricultural Experiment Station, brings it all into focus in his talk on “Organic Blueberry Production and Promise”.

“Introducing Ms. Penny Heritage, new communications person for the New York Berry Growers Association”, is one of the happenings in this session during the NYSBGA annual meeting. Learn more about the association’s very successful efforts in mobilizing state funding for critical Spotted Wing Drosophila research and how you, too, can benefit from membership in this highly motivated organization.

And now here’s…the rest of the story! If you had to give an opinion of the return on investment berry crops provide to your operation what would you say? Would your answer be a factual one based on your most recent berry farm business summary and enterprise budget data? Mr. Dan Welch, FarmNet Business and Succession Planning Coordinator from the Cornell University Charles H. Dyson School of Applied Economics and management will provide final insights from a 2-year berry farm business summary research and extension project, funded by the NY Farm Viability Institute, and explain how you, too, can get set up to evaluate berry crop return on investment for your operation.

Afternoon Berry Session, Thursday, January 22, 2015, 1 to 4 PM

Looking for a new berry market but not sure which way to go? Try heading south! Berries are becoming more and more popular in the “Big Apple”. Bob Weybright from the Cornell Cooperative Extension Eastern NY Commercial Horticulture program shares his insights on small fruit marketing opportunities in NYC.

Have other commercial berry growers really “Gone Bigger” successfully?! And just how big, is BIG? Be on hand for the “Going Bigger” grower panel to hear 3 growers share their insights. Panelists include Mr. Steve Polter, Polter’s Berry Farm, Fremont, OH, Mrs. Shirley Kline from Happy Valley Berry Farm, Bridgeton, NJ and Mr. Nate Nourse, Nourse Farms, Whately, MA. Each will briefly share how they “went bigger’ with their operation. A 15 minute audience Q&A is included in this panel discussion.

Do you feel like your efforts in commercial blueberry production are for the birds?! Hear Cornell graduate student Ms. Heidi Henrichs discuss her latest findings in bird management in fruit crops and tip the scales back in your favor (and perhaps sell a used car, or two, in the process…)

Those rotten root weevils! Is it possible to minimize damage from these unseen and often undetected pests in your strawberry plantings before it’s too late? Dr. Elson Shields from the Cornell Department of Entomology will share exciting results from his trials using microscopic entomophagus nematodes (aka bug-eating soil inhabiting round worms…) which you CAN grow and try at home!

“Where have all the…honeybees gone?!” seems to be one of the new songs of the day. How can you offset loss of these pollinators in your small fruit crops, particularly strawberries? Ms. Heather Connelly, graduate student in the Cornell Department of Entomology, shares results from her research work on improving strawberry pollination using wild flower plantings.

The final berry session of the day continues to provide updated insights on, you got it, Spotted Wing Drosophila and its management. Dr. Greg Loeb, Cornell Department of Entomology, and Ms. Dale Ila Riggs, President, NYS BGA, will share research findings on several fronts from work being done here in NYS to combat this invasive species.

So plan to join us for information packed 2015 EXPO berry educational program, you’ll be glad you came!

 

The Winter Wednesday Lunch Series of vegetable and small fruit production webinars returns for its fourth year starting December 10, 2014, and running through March 25, 2015. Penn State and Cornell University have teamed up to present this series of webinars to keep you informed about critical production issues.

This series provides convenient access to timely updates in commercial vegetable and small fruit production for extension educators, producers, and industry representatives in Pennsylvania, New York, and surrounding states.

The sessions, available live and recorded, feature both Penn State and Cornell speakers on a range of specific topics. All webinars are held from 1-2 p.m. on Wednesday afternoons, as follows:

  • December 10, 2014. Hydroponic Vegetable Production. Tom Ford, Extension Educator, Penn State Extension.
  • January 14, 2015. Current Issues in Strawberry Pest Management. Kathy Demchak, Senior Extension Associate, Penn State; and Cathy Heidendreich, Extension Support Specialist, Cornell.
  • February 11, 2015. Soil Health Through Reduced Tillage and Cover Crops. Carol MacNeil, Extension Vegetable Specialist, Cornell; and Dr. Thomas Bjorkman, Associate Professor, Cornell.
  • March 4, 2015. Using Sanitizers in Wash Water. Dr. Luke LaBorde, Associate Professor, Penn State.
  • March 25, 2015. Tomato Nutrition in High Tunnels. Steve Bogash, Extension Educator, Penn State; and Judson Reid, Extension Vegetable Specialist, Cornell.

The cost for the webinars are $10 per session or $35 for the entire series. All you need to participate is access to a computer with internet access (DSL or faster) and speakers or headphones. Register online or by phone (724-627-3745).

November 6, 2014

6:30-8:30 pm

Vince’s Park, Seneca Falls NY, Intersection of Route 318 and Routes 5+20

pawpaw

Have you ever thought of growing pawpaws? Pawpaw is a native fruit with a tropical-like flavor that has been described as a cross between a banana, mango and pineapple. They are rarely found in markets because the fruit is damaged easily when ripe. Steve Gabriel from the Cornell Small Farms Program and owner of Wellspring Forest Farm will be presenting a pawpaw production workshop, covering such topics as pawpaw management, site selection, and sourcing pawpaw trees.

You can register online at www.senecacountycce.org or contact Derek Simmonds at 315-539-9251 or dcs285@cornell.edu. Cost is $15 per family.

Berries are the crown jewels of Summer and Fall farm bounty, and can be a profitable enterprise on their own, or a good complement to an existing operation. Learn to produce and market strawberries, raspberries, blueberries, and other less common small fruits in a 6-week online course starting Nov. 6.

BF 122: Berry Production – Getting Started with Production and Marketing is a 6-week online course that will help you determine whether you want to add berries to your farm, and make a plan for doing so. The course consists of weekly real-time webinars followed by homework, readings, and discussions on your own time in an online setting.

**New this year: students who successfully complete the course requirements are eligible to be considered for a 0% interest crowdfunded loan of up to $10,000 through Kiva Zip.**

The course runs Thurs Nov 6 – Dec. 18, 2014–skipping Thurs. Nov. 27 for Thanksgiving–with webinars Thurs. evenings from 6:30-8pm EST. The cost is $200, but multiple people from the same farm may participate without paying extra. See  the course description page for more on the course learning objectives, instructors, and outline.

BF 122: Berry Production is part of the line-up of 12 online courses offered this Fall, Winter and Spring by the Cornell Small Farms Program. Learn which courses would be best for you, read about our team of experienced instructors, see answers to Frequently Asked Questions, and  view the calendar of course offerings for 2013-2014.

Courses often fill very quickly, so don’t miss your chance to sign up today!

Nearly 50 growers, educators and others attended the Berry Open House hosted at Cornell Orchards and the East Ithaca Research Facility last Friday. Topics covered by faculty and graduate students from several departments,  NYSIPM Program and Cornell Cooperative Extension educators included day-neutral low tunnel strawberry systems, cranberries, bird deterrents, spotted-wing drosophila management, biopesticides, soil health, trellising systems, berry varieties, pollinators and more.

Attendees view day-neutral low tunnel production system research.

Attendees view day-neutral low tunnel production system research.

Click on thumbnails for larger view.

Cornell University Cooperative Extension of Allegany County in conjunction with Cornell University Regional Grape Program staff is hosting an Introduction to IPM and Managing Vineyard Pests Workshop for existing and potential commercial grape growers. This half day program will be held Nov. 6th (Thursday) from 8:30-12:30. Luke Haggerty, Cornell Viticulture Extension Specialist and Tim Weigle, Cornell Statewide Grape IPM Specialist, will be presenting at the workshop. This is a regional workshop and interested parties from surrounding areas are encouraged to attend.

Topics will cover:

* how to select the best site for growing grapes,

* environmentally and economically sensible ways to protect crops from insects,

* selecting the grape varieties that will grow in your climate and,

* how to plant your grapes and establish the structure for their optimal growth.

Growers are encouraged to ask questions and actively participate in the course. NYSDEC pesticide credits have been applied for in categories 1a, 10, and 22.

Cost of the program is $15.00 per person or $25.00 for two people from the same farm/household. Pre-registration is required. If you are interested in signing up for this program, please contact Colleen Cavagna at 585-268-7644 ext. 12 or cc746@cornell.edu.

What: Introduction to IPM and Managing Vineyard Pests Workshop When: Nov. 6th (Thursday), 2014 Where: Cornell Cooperative Extension Belmont Office (5435A County Road 48, Belmont NY) Time: 8:30 A.M. – 12:30 P.M. Cost: $15.00 per person or $25.00 for 2 people from the same farm/household. Pre-registration is required. Contact: Colleen Cavagna at cc746@cornell.edu or 585-268-7644 ext. 12.

The September 2014 issue of New York Berry News is now available online.

Highlights include:

  • Berry Bytes
  • A Comment on Strawberry Varieties 
  • Humid Weather Increases Botrytis Gray Mold Pressure in Fall Raspberries
  • New York Strawberry Production Up, Blueberry Production Down, for 2013
  • How Healthy is Your “Underground Livestock”?!
  • New e-book: Cold Climate Strawberry Farming
  • SWD Media Buzz: Tips for Grower Interviews
  • North American Strawberry Symposium and NASGA Berry Conference
  • NARBA in Savannah
  • New Regulations Seek to Prevent the Spread of Invasive Species in New York State
  • How Long Do I Keep All This Food Safety Paperwork?
  • FDA Announces Cooperative Agreement to Implement National Produce Safety Rule
  • Whacking Weeds Organically – Jan Suszkiw
  • NOP: New Cost Share Resources
  • Consider a Food Bank as a Market Opportunity
  • The Pesticide Safety Education Program Reaches a 50-Year Milestone
  • Stockton’s Timorex Gold® Biofungicide Receives EPA Registration Articles
  • USDA Researchers Identify Stink Bug Attractant
  • Protecting Irrigation Equipment from Winter Damage
  • National Farm Safety and Health Week” Highlights Important Help that is Available
  • Stay Prepared: Hurricane Season Doesn’t End with Summer
  • How EDEN Can Help YOU Prepare for Disasters

pawpawsHave you ever thought of growing pawpaws? Pawpaw is a native fruit with a tropical fruit-like flavor that has been described as a cross between a banana, mango and pineapple. They are rarely found in markets because the fruit is easily damaged when ripe.

Cornell Cooperative Extension of Seneca County is offering a Pawpaw Production Workshop on Wednesday evening, November 6, 2014 from 6:30 pm to 8:30 pm. The workshop will be held at Vince’s Park at the intersection of Rt 314 and Rts 5+20 in Seneca Falls, NY.

Steven Gabriel, from the Cornell Small Farms Program and owner of Wellspring Forest Farm in Mecklenburg NY will be the presenter. Steve has recently co-authored a book called Farming the Woods with Cornell professor Ken Mudge. The workshop will cover various topics related to growing pawpaws including pawpaw management, site selection and sourcing pawpaw trees.

Cost is $15 per Farm or Family

More information and online registration.

low tunnel strawberries

Low tunnel strawberries ready for harvest. Photo courtesy J. Ochterski.

Cornell University’s School of Integrated Plant Science (SIPS) Horticulture Section is sponsoring a small fruit open house from 12:45 to 4:30 pm on Friday, October 3, 2014.

The two-part program, hosted by Dr. Marvin Pritts, professor and berry crop specialist, will include researchers, extension specialists and graduate students from SIPS Horticulture and Plant Pathology and Plant-Microbe Biology Sections, Cornell Departments of Entomology and Natural Resources, and the Cornell Cooperative Extension Eastern NY Commercial Horticulture Team.

The program will begin at 1:00 PM. Participants should meet at Cornell Orchard, 709 Dryden Road (Route 366), Ithaca, NY 14850 between 12:30 PM to 12:45 PM for parking, check-in, and announcements.

Part one of the program will be held at Cornell Orchard, located on route 366 in Ithaca across from the Vet School parking lot. Topics for part one of the 2014 open house will include a chance to examine and discuss a new strawberry low tunnel production system being introduced to the Northeast region, a look at a new cranberry demonstration planting, techniques for minimizing bird damage in berry crops, an inside look at biopesticides as a newly emerging disease management tool, and an update on applied berry research efforts in eastern New York.

Part two of the program will be held at the East Ithaca Farm located just around the corner from Cornell Orchard on Maple Ave. Topics for this portion of the program will include techniques for monitoring and managing Spotted Wing Drosophila, a new invasive fruit fly, using wild flower plantings to enhance strawberry pollination, a berry variety question and answer session with Dr. Courtney Weber, Cornell small fruits breeder, introduction of a new research project on soil amendments and their effects on strawberry soil health and finally, a discussion of trellising systems for high tunnel blackberries.

A refreshment break will be provided between program sessions. The open house will be held rain or shine; umbrellas and/or lawn chairs may be desirable.

The open house is free and open to the public but pre-registration is required to ensure adequate transportation, handouts, and refreshments. Signs will be posted on the day of the event. Please register by phone or e-mail by contacting Cathy Heidenreich, mcm4@cornell.edu, 315-787-2367 no later than Friday, September 26, 2014.

More information…

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