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Tree fruit news

July 20 webinar: High Tech Precision Orchard Spraying

On Monday, July 20th at 4:00pm, Mike Basedow of the CCE ENYCH team is hosting a Precision Orchard Spraying webinar.  The work being presented has pertinence to berry crops, grapes and even staked vegetables.  Please share widely and consider attending if you have interest in this topic.

High Tech Precision Orchard Spraying

  • Date – July 20, 2020
  • Time – 4:00pm – 5:00pm
  • Location – Zoom webinar
  • Host – Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Join us the afternoon of July 20th to learn what’s new in orchard precision spraying technology. We’ll be joined by Dr. Jason Deveau, Dr. Heping Zhu, and Steve Booher.

Jason is an Application Technology Specialist with the Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food, and Rural Affairs (OMAFRA). Jason literally “wrote the book” on precision spraying, and will discuss the basic principles of precision spraying, along with what has been achieved over the last 35 years using rate controllers.

We will then hear from Dr. Zhu and Steve Booher. Heping is an Agricultural Engineer with the US Department of Agriculture Agricultural Research Service, and has extensively researched intelligent spray application technologies for horticultural crops. Steve is the founder and CEO of Smart Guided Systems, who worked closely with Heping to commercialize their research into the Smart Apply Intelligent Spray Control SystemTM.  Heping and Steve will discuss the science behind and the commercial application of their system, which utilizes pulsed lasers and advanced computer algorithms to remotely sense the volume of each tree to deliver a precise spray volume in real time.

After their presentations, we will open up the meeting for all three presenters to field questions and comments.

We request that you register ahead: Online registration.

Agenda

Dr. Jason Deveau, OMAFRA

  • The physics of pressure and flow (opening definitions and context).
  • The relationship between flow and travel speed on application rate: The plants perspective.
  • Rate controllers: Why haven’t air-assist sprayers adopted this technology (New since 1985!)
  • How rate controllers solve problems (and cause a couple).
  • Rate controllers: Three levels of sophistication.
  • Rate controllers: The gateway drug to precision agriculture and traceability.

 Dr. Heping Zhu, USDA ARS, and Steve Booher, Smart Guided Systems

  • Basic theory and science behind the smart apply precision spray system
  • Results of field tests
  • Current Smart Apply commercial products and what growers can do with them

 Open Q&A

View flyer.

Webinar June 29: Summer insect management in cherry – keeping covered for SWD

Webinar: Summer insect management in cherry – keeping covered for SWD
Monday June 29th, noon-1pm
Registration link: https://cornell.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_I4pJnTqkToiiNGTtXqGB_g

Organized by Lake Ontario Fruit program and NYS IPM. Proudly sponsored by FMC and Valent USA.

Agenda:

  • 10 min: Intro, sponsorship, SWD biology basics – Janet v Z
  • 15 min: SWD management in tart cherry – Julie C
  • 20 min: Managing cherry fruit fly, black cherry fruit fly, and European cherry fruit fly – Art A
  • 15 min: Questions and answers

As SWD has now been trapped in most locations across the state, and fruit begins to blush, it’s time to be sure to keep a tight control schedule in any orchard with SWD pressure. Join us for this webinar, organized by LOF and NYS IPM and sponsored by Valent and FMC, where we will discuss the best management tactics to combine control for SWD and fruit flies in cherry and other crops.

This event is free, but pre-registration is required. Once you register, you will receive and email with a password, which will be required to login.

Any questions or concerns with registration please direct to Craig Kahlke at cjk37@cornell.edu.

 

High Tech Precision Orchard Spraying webinar July 20, 4 to 5 p.m. EDT

High Tech Precision Orchard Spraying webinar
July 20, 4 to 5 p.m. EDT

Program:

Dr. Jason Deveau, Application Technology Specialist with the Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food, and Rural Affairs (OMAFRA):

  • The physics of pressure and flow (opening definitions and context).
  • The relationship between flow and travel speed on application rate: The plants perspective.
  • Rate controllers: Why haven’t air-assist sprayers adopted this technology (New since 1985!)
  • How rate controllers solve problems (and cause a couple).
  • Rate controllers: Three levels of sophistication.
  • Rate controllers: The gateway to precision agriculture and traceability.

Dr. Heping Zhu, USDA ARS, and Steve Booher, Smart Guided Systems:

  • Basic theory and science behind the smart apply precision spray system
  • Results of field tests
  • Current Smart Apply commercial products and what growers can do with them

More information and registration for the webinar.

New publication: Best Management Practices for U-Pick Farms During the COVID-19 Pandemic

New at the Cornell Small Farms website:

Best Management Practices for U-Pick Farms During the COVID-19 Pandemic

U-Pick is a critical direct marketing approach for many of our farms and provides customers with a unique connection to fresh produce grown close to home. In light of what we understand about the spread of COVID-19, new management practices will be needed to protect your farm team and your customers. This document provides recommended practices and communication strategies for U-Pick operations for the 2020 season.

.pdf version

August apple events

Mark your calendars:

Follow the links for more program information.

Spotted Lanternfly webinars

In conjunction with the New York State IPM Program and the Department of Agriculture and Markets, the Northeastern IPM Center will host a collection of webinars, titled “Spotted Lanternfly Basics.”

Each webinar will focus on, and be tailored to, a specific commodity group:

  • Spotted Lanternfly Basics for Hops, Berry, and Vegetable Growers (Feb. 26, 2019, 10:00 a.m.)
  • Spotted Lanternfly Basics for Grape and Apple Industries (Feb. 26, 2019, 1:00 p.m.)
  • Spotted Lanternfly Basics for Christmas Tree Growers (Mar. 4, 2019, 10:00 a.m.)
  • Spotted Lanternfly Basics for Nursery, Greenhouse, and Landscape Industries (Mar. 4, 2019, 1:00 p.m.)

All webinars will follow a similar format that covers spotted lanternfly biology, identification, and hosts, monitoring and management strategies, and a regulatory update. While the content may be relevant to audiences throughout the Northeast, management practices covered will be specific to New York. Participants will be encouraged to ask questions.

For more information and registration links, go to: http://neipmc.org/go/mYey

Pesticide Decision-Making Guide to Protect Pollinators in Tree Fruit Orchards now available

guide coverA Pesticide Decision-Making Guide to Protect Pollinators in Tree Fruit Orchards

This comprehensive  easy-to-use provides at-a-glance perspectives on best choices for protecting tree fruit crops while protecting pollinators.

Other publications and future guides in this series can be found on the Cornell Pollinator Network Grower Resource Page.

Pollinator Conservation Short Course Nov. 7

Pollinator Conservation Short Course
Iroquois National Wildlife Refuge, Basom, NY
Wednesday November 7th, 2018
9:30 AM – 3:00 PM

This full day workshop will focus on concepts around protecting and enhancing populations of pollinators, especially bees, in agricultural landscapes. The course will provide an overview of bee natural history and farm practices that support pollinators, such as protecting and creating habitat, modified horticultural practices, and advice on how to manage pests while protecting pollinators.

Introductory topics include the principles of pollinator biology and integrated crop pollination, the economics of insect pollination, basic bee field identification, and evaluating pollinator habitat. Advanced modules will cover land management practices for pollinator protection, pollinator habitat restoration, incorporating pollinator conservation into federal conservation programs, selection of plants for pollinator enhancement sites, management of natural landscapes, and financial and technical resources to support these efforts. Throughout the short course these training modules are illustrated by case studies of pollinator conservation efforts across the country.

Registrants will receive the Xerces Society’s Pollinator Conservation Toolkit which includes Xerces’ book, Attracting Native Pollinators. as well as habitat management guidelines and relevant USDA-NRCS and extension publications.

The Xerces Society is offering similar Pollinator Conservation Short Courses, as well as Conservation Biological Control Short Courses across the country. Visit our online events page to view up-to-date short course information.

More information.

 

 

The Emerging Industry of Hard Cider

Greg Peck

Greg Peck

From Cornell Research website:

From the earliest days of the American colonies, hard cider was a common staple. European settlers brought their cider-making skills with them, along with apple cultivars especially suited to the process. Yet, after prohibition ended in 1933, cider making in the United States was all but forgotten—until now. “Since 2011 the growth of the cider industry has been astronomical,” says Gregory M. Peck, School of Integrative Plant Science, Horticulture. “There’s been more than a 900 percent increase in the volume of cider produced in the U.S. New York has more individual producers than any other state in the country. Right now, we have about 85, and that number is growing constantly. I’m always getting emails and calls for help from new businesses.”

Peck is perhaps the foremost scientific expert in the country on cider apples and cider making. He is at the forefront of the cider renaissance and a large part of his research revolves around this emerging industry. “Cider apple growers and producers need a lot of technical support,” he says. “They need research to help them figure out which cultivars make the best cider, how to grow them, how to harvest them, how to store them. Those are the questions I’m trying to answer for the industry.”

Read the whole article.

Growers in pursuit of precision agriculture

Mario Miranda Sazo

Mario Miranda Sazo

From Good Fruit Grower [2017-09-19]:

As New York growers seek to expand fresh market production of high quality fruit, they are looking for ways to maximize performance of high-density apple plantings and recoup the investments of new orchards faster.

Luckily, Cornell University researchers continue to learn how to optimize horticultural practices in the region’s signature tall-spindle systems, and they shared their findings on irrigation, nutrition and chemical thinning with growers at a summer field day at five farms in the Lake Ontario fruit belt.

Although it’s been a wet season so far, growers haven’t forgotten the drought of the previous year, with losses of 47 percent for those without irrigation, according to a Cornell study.

More growers are investing in irrigation systems said Mario Miranda Sazo, extension educator for Cornell Cooperative Extension’s Lake Ontario Fruit Program.

“When I came here in 2009 and started talking about irrigation, you all said, ‘You don’t know our weather here,’” Miranda Sazo joked with the tour group. “But we should be putting irrigation on these new plantings and little by little, growers are installing it. You have to baby-sit these trees from the get-go.”

Read the whole article.

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