Cornell Field Crops News

Timely Field Crops information for the New York Agricultural Community

June 28, 2018
by Cornell Field Crops
Comments Off on Weather Outlook –June 28, 2018

Weather Outlook –June 28, 2018

NOAA Northeast Regional Climate Center, Cornell University

Last week temperatures ranged from 8 degrees below normal to near- normal. Precipitation has ranged from less than ¼ “ to 2”. Base 50 growing degree-days ranged from 50-130. Abnormally dry conditions have been expanded for part of central NY.

HOT and humid over the weekend.

Today rain showers and isolated thunderstorms will continue as a system moves across the state; heavy rainfall possible for the Hudson Valley Region. Showers will diminish from west to east with temperatures in the 70s to low 80s and muggy. Overnight lows will be in the mid 50s to mid 60s.

Friday will be mostly sunny and warmer with highs in the 80s to near 90, but with lower humidity. Overnight temperatures will be in the upper 50s to mid 60s.

Saturday temperatures will be in the mid 80s to mid 90s, with sunny, hot, and humid conditions. Heat indices could reach the 100s. Overnight temperatures will be in the 60s to mid 70s.

Sunday highs will be in the upper 80s and 90s, as hot & humid conditions continue. Heat indices could reach the 100s. Overnight temperatures will be in the 60s to mid 70s.

Monday temperatures will be in the 80s to mid 90s with humid conditions and a chance for scattered showers and thunderstorms. Heat indices could reach the 100s. Overnight temperatures will be in the 60s to low 70s.

Tuesday will be partly to mostly cloudy with highs will be in the upper 70s to low 90s, with humid conditions and showers and thunderstorms possible. Overnight temperatures will be in the 60s.

Wednesday will be partly to mostly cloudy with highs will be in the upper 70s to low 90s, with humid conditions and showers and thunderstorms possible. Overnight temperatures will be in the 60s.

The seven-day precipitation amounts will range from a trace to one inch.

The 8-14 day outlook (July 5-11) favors above-normal temperatures for all of the state. The precipitation outlook favors near-normal amounts.

Maps of 8-14 day outlooks:
http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/predictions/814day/index.php

National Weather Service watch/warnings map:
http://www.weather.gov/erh/

US Drought Monitor
http://droughtmonitor.unl.edu/Home.aspx

Drought Impact Reporter:
http://droughtreporter.unl.edu/map

CLIMOD2 (NRCC data interface):
http://climodtest.nrcc.cornell.edu

June 26, 2018
by Cornell Field Crops
Comments Off on Got Corn Rootworm? Try This Alfalfa Pest Solution from Northern NY Research Results

Got Corn Rootworm? Try This Alfalfa Pest Solution from Northern NY Research Results

Adult corn rootworm on corn silk. Photo: USDA/Tom Hlavaty

Following the successful application of biocontrol nematodes to reduce the impact of alfalfa snout beetle, Northern New York farmers and a research team led by Cornell University entomologist Elson Shields are now evaluating their use to combat corn rootworm. The most recent report of research trial results is posted at www.nnyagdev.org.

If the biocontrol nematodes are as effective against corn rootworm, farmers could potentially eliminate the need and expense for corn varieties with incorporated Bt toxin for corn rootworm or for soil insecticide use on conventional corn varieties.

Research across 85 fields on farms in Northern New York where biocontrol nematodes have been applied to reduce snout beetle populations has shown that the biocontrol nematodes persist in fields after rotation to corn. Their populations are also known to increase in corn years 2-4 when corn rootworm larvae are feeding on corn roots.

In trials since 2014 when the biocontrol nematodes were applied at the Musgrave Research Farm in Aurora, NY, they have persisted in high levels each year. They have reduced corn root feeding damage with results equal or at a better level of root protection than with the best BT-CRW corn variety in year 2 of the corn crop in the trial. Their level of persistence has also been at a level sufficient for controlling corn rootworm larvae when the population rebounds from the wet years during the hatching period.

One of the farms participating in this research is Morning Star Farms in Henderson, NY. A spring 2018 bioassay there indicated a high level of nematode persistence two years after application. The level is high enough to protect a new alfalfa stand there from invasion of alfalfa snout beetle in coming years.

The value of this biocontrol nematode research has now traveled from Northern New York to multiple states. For example, in West Texas, where corn rootworm adult populations have been very high, the use of biocontrol nematodes resulted in significant reduction of the pest and the root damage caused by it.

The biocontrol nematode protocol is also being tested in field trials in New Mexico, Ohio, and Michigan.

Shields notes, “Without the long-term support of the Northern New York Agricultural Development Program for the research needed to develop a solution for alfalfa snout beetle, this study to evaluate the potential to eliminate the need for BT-rootworm corn or soil insecticides on conventional varieties would not be possible here in New York or in the other states now applying the biocontrol nematodes.”

The farmer-driven Northern New York Agricultural Development Program is a research and technical assistance program for the farmers in the six northernmost counties of New York State. Funding for the Northern New York Agricultural Development Program is supported by the New York State Senate and administered by the New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets. The results of past projects funded through the Program are posted at www.nnyagdev.org.

June 21, 2018
by Cornell Field Crops
Comments Off on Weather Outlook – June 21, 2018

Weather Outlook – June 21, 2018

NOAA Northeast Regional Climate Center, Cornell University

Last week temperatures ranged from 2 degrees below normal to 4 degrees above normal. Precipitation has ranged from less than ¼ “ to 3”. Base 50 growing degree-days ranged from 60-140. Abnormally dry conditions have been introduced for many areas in NY.

Dry Thursday and Friday until a frontal system brings rain later Friday through the weekend.

Today will be sunny with temperatures in the 70s and low humidity. Overnight lows will be in the mid 40’s to low 50s.

Friday highs will be in the upper 70s to low 80s; clouds and light rain will spread into in western NY in the afternoon. Overnight temperatures will be in the upper 50s to low 60s.

Saturday temperatures will be in the mid 60s and 70s with showers likely and some thunderstorms possible. Overnight temperatures will be in the upper 50s to mid 60s.

Sunday shower continue, but will be more scattered. Highs will be in the 70s. Overnight temperatures will be in the 50s.

Monday highs will be in the 80s with dry weather for most areas, northern NY may see some lingering showers. Overnight temperatures will be in the upper 40s to mid 50s.

Tuesday will be sunny with highs will be in the mid 70s to low 80s. Overnight temperatures will be in the 50s.

Wednesday highs will be in the 80s. Overnight temperatures will be in the mid 50s to low 60s.

The seven-day precipitation amounts will range from half an inch to 1 ½ inch.

The 8-14 day outlook (June 28-July 4) favors above-normal temperatures for all of the state. The precipitation outlook slightly favors above-normal amounts for all but the northeast corner of the state.

Maps of 8-14 day outlooks:
http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/predictions/814day/index.php

National Weather Service watch/warnings map:
http://www.weather.gov/erh/

US Drought Monitor
http://droughtmonitor.unl.edu/Home.aspx

Drought Impact Reporter:
http://droughtreporter.unl.edu/map

CLIMOD2 (NRCC data interface):
http://climodtest.nrcc.cornell.edu

June 18, 2018
by Cornell Field Crops
Comments Off on Weather Outlook –June 14, 2018

Weather Outlook –June 14, 2018

NOAA Northeast Regional Climate Center, Cornell University

Last week temperatures ranged from 6 degrees below normal to 2 degrees above normal. Precipitation has ranged from a trace to one inch. Base 50 growing degree-days ranged from 30-110.

Monday highs will be in the 80s to mid 90s in some locations with showers and thunderstorms possible later in the day. High humidity conditions will continue, the heat index may reach upper 90s in areas of the mid-Hudson Valley. Overnight temperatures will be in the 60s.

Tuesday highs will be in the upper 70s to low 80s with a chance of showers with a frontal passage. Overnight temperatures will be in the upper 50s to mid 60s.

Wednesday highs will be in the upper 70s to low 80s. Overnight temperatures will be in the upper 50s to low 60s.

The seven-day precipitation amounts will range from a quarter of an inch to one inch.

The 8-14 day outlook (June 21-27) favors above-normal temperatures for all of the state. The precipitation outlook favors near-normal amounts for most of the state.

Maps of 8-14 day outlooks:
http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/predictions/814day/index.php

National Weather Service watch/warnings map:
http://www.weather.gov/erh/

US Drought Monitor
http://droughtmonitor.unl.edu/Home.aspx

CLIMOD2 (NRCC data interface):
http://climodtest.nrcc.cornell.edu

June 5, 2018
by Cornell Field Crops
Comments Off on Dairies Cannot Afford to Ignore Alfalfa Snout Beetle, Even in Low Milk Price Cycle

Dairies Cannot Afford to Ignore Alfalfa Snout Beetle, Even in Low Milk Price Cycle

Untreated, alfalfa snout beetle is costing Northern New York farmers with 100-cow dairies between $30,000 to $60,000 per year every year, depending on the size of the pest infestation and the speed of alfalfa stand loss.

The current cost of controlling alfalfa snout beetle with biocontrol nematodes in a single application for multi-year control is $28 per acre plus the cost of application by the farmer or a custom service.

“Even with the terrible milk prices farmers are currently facing, the cost of biocontrol nematode application should be weighed against the cost of not protecting your alfalfa crop,” says Dr. Elson Shields, the Cornell University entomologist who pioneered the biocontrol nematode solution to combat alfalfa snout beetle and that now appears to be useful for protecting other crops.

With assistance from Ev Thomas, Oak Point Agronomics, Ltd; Mike Hunter, Cornell Cooperative Extension; Tom Kilcer, Advanced Ag Systems, LLC; and Michael Miller, W.H. Miner Agricultural Research Institute, Shields and Research Support Specialist Antonio Testa estimate the true cost of alfalfa snout beetle moving onto the farm in three distinct areas:

1. alfalfa stand and yield loss: average $325 per acre (per cow) per year; range: $200-$500 depending on speed of loss of stand

2. expense of off-farm protein purchased to replace forage quality of lost alfalfa crop; for example, extra soy costs: average $120 per cow per year; range: $56.40-$201;

3.  the resulting impact on farm CAFO plan from increased phosphorus brought on farm with increased purchases of protein-like soybean meal.

When a nematode-treated alfalfa field is rotated into corn, research has shown a positive impact on reducing wireworms and corn rootworm.  After 4 years of corn production, research has shown that the biocontrol nematodes remain in the field at sufficient populations to provide continual control of alfalfa snout beetle.

Biocontrol nematode applications must be made before September 15. Best results are obtained by applying to alfalfa fields in their seeding year or first production year. Three to five are needed to totally inoculate a farm with nematodes to reduce the snout beetle population to a manageable level. Learn more at www.alfalfasnoutbeetle.org.

A long-term research commitment by the farmer-driven Northern New York Agricultural Development Program supported the development of the science needed to pioneer the use of native nematodes, tiny insect-attacking worms, as a biocontrol to suppress the spread of alfalfa snout beetle. Subsequent research funded by the Northern New York Agricultural Development Program, New York Farm Viability Institute, and others is showing application of the biocontrol nematodes for controlling berry pests, white grub, and other crop pests in New York State and elsewhere in the U.S.

Funding for the Northern New York Agricultural Development Program is supported by the New York State Senate and administered by the New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets. Learn more at www.nnyagdev.org.

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