Cornell Field Crops News

Timely Field Crops information for the New York Agricultural Community

October 29, 2012
by mem40@cornell.edu
Comments Off on Prepare Early for Hurricane Sandy

Prepare Early for Hurricane Sandy

Cornell Cooperative Extension urges all farmers to prepare for storm
Cornell Cooperative Extension | Oct. 29, 2012

Cornell Cooperative Extension urges all farmers to prepare ahead of time for power outages, structural or crop damage, insurance claims and damage that could accompany Hurricane Sandy, also dubbed “Frankenstorm” and the “Perfect Storm.” The New York State Office of Emergency Management is already warning citizens of Sandy’s approach, and New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets urges farmers to pay close attention to those warnings.

Long-range preparations can include purchasing or making rental agreements for special equipment, making adjustments to property and reviewing business arrangements. Short-range preparations should focus on immediate concerns such as turning off propane, moving livestock or equipment to safe places or updating phone numbers for emergency assistance.

Equipment needs may include a generator, fuel, a hand fuel pump, fire extinguishers, first aid kits, a flashlight and batteries, NOAA weather radio and batteries, stored water and feed for humans and livestock and a camera to document damage.

Photos of agricultural losses are very helpful to the USDA, especially with their livestock indemnity programs.

Tobacco farms or nursery operations with greenhouses, dairies, and hog and poultry operations are especially vulnerable if power remains out for a lengthy period. Those farmers may want to purchase a generator, and the sooner the better. Farmers who cannot purchase a generator should consider leasing or negotiating a rental arrangement for a back-up generator in advance. Be aware that some rental contracts are only for eight hours use per day.

Property preparations can include clearing debris from drainage ditches so water can run freely, checking power lines for clearance and pruning or removing trees that could fall on lines, surveying buildings for limbs or trees close to buildings and pounding in extra nails or tightening hurricane straps to prevent wind damage. Other precautions include clearing away all debris that could blow in high winds, securing farm signs and photographing valuable items and storing the pictures off site.

Farmers and home owners alike should store all business records above flood level, which is generally at least two feet off the floor.

A final long-range preventive measure is reviewing business affairs, including insurance policies, debt level and finances. Farmers need to ensure they have adequate insurance coverage for homes, vehicles, farm buildings and structures, crops and flood damage.

Finally, farmers should develop an emergency plan for their families and their farm workers and should establish a meeting place where everyone can gather after a disaster. They also need to assign and prioritize preparation and recovery duties.

Short-range preparations are those things to do now, even though Sandy’s path is still somewhat uncertain. These include:

  • Monitoring local weather reports for up-to-the-minute information on the storm.
  • Charging batteries on cell phones and cameras.
  • Determining check-in points for family members and workers.
  • Storing or securing items or equipment that may blow away or blow into structures, including lawn furniture and ornaments.
  • Checking generators to be sure they are in good working order and purchasing sufficient amounts of fuel to operate them.
  • Checking feed inventory and ordering extra if needed.
  • Moving poultry and livestock to higher ground if possible and sheltering them in securely battened barns, houses or tightly-fenced areas.
  • Planning for the possibility of evacuation and identifying horse facilities in nearby vicinities that are willing to take horses in an emergency. Find out what their requirements are for vaccinations or tests such as the Coggins Test. Have a system for permanently identifying each horse with its name, your name and a phone number.
  • Turning off the propane supply at tanks and securing tanks in the event of flooding to prevent them from floating away.
  • Moving equipment to the highest, open ground possible away from trees or buildings.
  • Pumping and storing adequate supplies of drinking water for humans and animals in the case of power outages.  Recommendations are for a minimum 36-hour reserve.
  •  Topping off all gas, propane and other fuel tanks, including the family vehicles.
  • Marking animals with an identifier so they can be returned to you if lost. This can include ear tags with name of farm and/or phone numbers, brands, paint markings on hooves or coat or clipped initials in the hair.
  • Moving feed to higher ground or to a more accessible place in case of flooding or transportation problems.
  • Checking the security of roofing materials, siding and windows and doors in barns and poultry houses to make sure they will not blow off or blow open in strong winds.
  • Coordinating with neighbors beforehand to discuss what resources can be shared in the event of power outages or flooding.
  • Making a list of important phone numbers ahead of time in order to make calls following a storm. Potential numbers to include are the local emergency management office, county extension agent, insurance agent, county Farm Service Agency and private veterinarian. For local emergency offices, contact http://www.dhses.ny.gov/oem/contact/
  • Being prepared for storms and hurricanes could help farmers limit their losses, but preparation needs to begin now, before Hurricane Sandy hits Upstate New York.

You may be interested in consulting the Hurricane Irene archive for further information regarding agriculture issues and disaster recovery: http://emergencypreparedness.cce.cornell.edu/disasters/pages/irene-lee.aspx

Finally, keep up to date with the latest developments regarding Hurricane Sandy at the following social media sites:

https://twitter.com/CCE_Disaster

http://www.facebook.com/CceEden

October 26, 2012
by mem40@cornell.edu
Comments Off on Agri-Service Business Roundtable October 31, 2012

Agri-Service Business Roundtable October 31, 2012

 This upcoming meeting will be part discussion, part pep rally and part group therapy.    A reprise of the last discussions we had in 2008 and 2010.   We had over 40 attendees representing dairy, feed industry, veterinarians, lenders, environmental planners and field crops.

Date is on October 31 (Wednesday) from 10am-noon at the Ramada Inn, Watertown.

Cost is $10 with coffee, tea, danish and muffins for refreshments.

A great occasion to get together with your associates in and outside your field of expertise to talk about the opportunities and challenges for agriculture in Northern NY after a demanding summer. You are one of the many resources available to Northern NY farmers to advance their milk production, crop, environmental, and business management skills.

We appreciate you letting us know of your intentions to attend.              
E-mail –  rak76@cornell.edu

Mike Hunter; Ron Kuck; Art Baderman – CCE of Jefferson County            
788-8450

Joe Lawrence; Peggy Murray – CCE of Lewis County                                       
376-5270

The annual Cornell Feed Dealers Meeting with Dr. Larry Chase and Dr. Tom Overton will follow the roundtable beginning with lunch at noon for those interested.

Cost for Feed Dealers Meeting is $30 which will also cover your cost for business roundtable

October 25, 2012
by mem40@cornell.edu
Comments Off on Variety Selection – New York State Trial Results for Alfalfa, Red Clover, Birdsfoot Trefoil, Cool Season Perennial Grasses

Variety Selection – New York State Trial Results for Alfalfa, Red Clover, Birdsfoot Trefoil, Cool Season Perennial Grasses

Julie Hansen, Don Viands, Department of Plant Breeding and Genetics, Cornell University
October 23, 2012

Each spring, over 100 varieties of forages are planted in replicated plot trials in New York State.  One alfalfa trial is planted in Ithaca (Cornell University Agricultural Experiment Station, South Central) and one trial is planted in a rotation at either Western New York, Eastern New York (SUNY Cobleskill), or Northern New York (William H. Miner Agricultural Research Institute, Chazy).  Other forages (red clover, birdsfoot trefoil and grasses) are planted at Ithaca. Each trial has from about 5 to 50 varieties in it and the trials are managed for four years.  Variety yield (tons / acre) and plant survival (%) are available on the web: http://plbrgen.cals.cornell.edu/cals/pbg/programs/departmental/forage/

Results for 2012 growing season will be available at this website in early November, so before selecting forage varieties to plant in 2013, check the trial results. 

Alfalfa varieties differ in characteristics such as fall dormancy, disease resistance, resistance to potato leafhopper, enhanced forage quality, hybrid genetics, roundup ready, and other characteristics.  Generally, yield is a main selection criterion for alfalfa varieties.  For the six production-year trials harvested in 2011, the average difference between the highest yielding variety in a trial and the lowest yielding variety in a trial was 1.25 tons per acre dry matter. 

Alfalfa varieties with high yields in the trials are generally well adapted to New York and are resistant to at least three diseases: Bacterial Wilt, Verticillium Wilt and Phytophthora root rot.  From the results of a trial, several high yielding varieties are identified, not just one variety.  Also, look for varieties that yield well in several trials over years, not just one trial.  In 2011, for the varieties that were in the top 50% of one or more of the six trials in New York,  5 varieties had a fall dormancy rating of 3 (dormant), 20 varieties had a fall dormancy rating of 4 (moderately dormant),  and 3 varieties had a fall dormancy rating of 5.  Fall dormancy is a rating of variety’s response to shorter days and lower temperatures, and a higher number means that the plants will grow more into the fall. Varieties that are less fall dormant (have a fall dormancy rating that is a higher number) may not be able to withstand winters over multiple years.

The 2012 report will contain yields of many forage varieties and their performance over several years and trials in New York.  Be sure to look over the trial results prior to purchasing seed for 2013.

October 25, 2012
by mem40@cornell.edu
Comments Off on Save the Date! 17th Annual North Country Crop Congress – 2/12/13

Save the Date! 17th Annual North Country Crop Congress – 2/12/13

17th Annual North Country Crop Congress with an Agribusiness Trade Show
February 12, 2013
Time and Location: TBA

For more information about this event, click here.

ATTENTION AGRIBUSINESSES
Cornell Cooperative Extension will be bringing back the Trade Show at this year’s Crop Congress.  It has been more than 10 years since we have included a trade show at this event.  However, we have received several requests by both farmers and agribusinesses to offer this opportunity again.  If your business would like to participate in the Trade Show, contact Megan Miller at 788-8450 ext. 254 or mbm243@cornell.edu for more details.

October 19, 2012
by mem40@cornell.edu
Comments Off on Online Pre-registration for the 2012 Field Crop Dealer Meeting Now Open

Online Pre-registration for the 2012 Field Crop Dealer Meeting Now Open

The 2012 Field Crop Dealer Meeting will be held on December 12th in Syracuse, NY at the Genesee Grande Hotel from 1 to 5pm.

Please pre-register for the Field Crop Dealer Meeting online at http://nysaba.com/meeting_registration. There is a $15 registration fee for the meeting.

DEC pesticide applicator credits and CCA continuing education credits will be requested.    

The Field Crop Dealer Meeting will precede the New York State Agri-business Association Annual Meeting which will be held the following day, December 13th. Registration for both meetings is separate and you can register for one or both meetings.

A tentative agenda for the 2012 Field Crop Dealer Meeting can be found at: http://fieldcrops.org/Calendar/Documents/2012%20FCDM%20Agenda.pdf.

Please contact Mary McKellar at mem40@cornell.ed if you have any questions.

October 16, 2012
by mem40@cornell.edu
Comments Off on Lewis County Ag Digest – November 2012

Lewis County Ag Digest – November 2012

The November 2012 Issue of the Lewis County Ag Digest is now posted online:  http://counties.cce.cornell.edu/lewis/agdigest.htm.

Items of Interest:

  • Moving Forward for Hoof Improvement
  • Precision Feeding-Best for Cows, CAFO and Your Wallet
  • Resistant Varieties-―Built In‖ Insurance Benefits
  • Growing Degree Day & Ordering 2013 Seed

 Upcoming Programs:

  • Hoof Health & Lameness Management Course
  • CCE Shop Meetings 2012-13 Series
  • Managing with Finance: A Basic Finance Class for Farm Business Managers
  • Save the Date: North Country Crop Congress – Feb. 12, 2013

October 15, 2012
by mem40@cornell.edu
Comments Off on Capital Area Ag & Hort e-Newsletter – October 14, 2012

Capital Area Ag & Hort e-Newsletter – October 14, 2012

For those who are interested in obtaining much more immediate communication with the CAAHP team then they are getting now, we are on Facebook…

Here is the address for our Facebook page: http://www.facebook.com/CCECAHP

The e-Newsletter’s goal is to provide a venue for communication about upcoming meetings and other pertinent information.

CALENDAR

October
October 16, 2012. Taking Stock: Evaluating Your Resources and Choosing an Enterprise WebinarSeries. This five-week an online course series for new and aspiring farmers seeking guidance in the development of a farm enterprise begins on Oct. 16. For more information and to register, visit http://hort.cals.cornell.edu/news-events/beginning_farmer_payment.cfm, www.nybeginningfarmers.org/, or contact ejf5@cornell.edu.

October 16, 2012- October 17, 2012. Growing Health 2012, Cultivating Common Ground: Farms, Food & Health. Riverwalk Hotel in downtown Binghamton, NY. Participants will focus on four critical issues which impact the effectiveness of accessing NYS food products to maximize nutrition and health. Register online atgrowinghealth.rhnscny.org or call 888-603-5973. Space is limited.

Tuesday, Oct. 16, 2012 Winter Forage Field Days at 1:00 pm, A. Ooms & Sons, 215 Rte 28A, Valatie, Columbia Co. Look for the CCE sign at an oat field west of the farm on Rte 28A. Call Aaron, 518-380-1496, for questions and to RSVP so that I can print the correct number of materials. Learn and see how to grow fall sown oats and winter grains for forage. Which fields are most suited for winter forage? Is it worth planting shorter season corn? Discuss a remarkable 2012 growing season with neighbors.

Oct. 16-18, 2012 74th Annual Cornell Nutrition Conference at Doubletree Hotel Syracuse, East Syracuse, New York. Registration Fee: $150.00 Late Registration: $175.00 (Postmarked after October 1, 2012) For more information contact: Heather (Howland) Darrow, Conference Coordinator, 272 Morrison Hall, Ithaca, NY 14853. Phone: (607) 255-4478, or dmconf@cornell.edu

October 17, 2012 Schenectady County Farm Bureau Annual Meetingat Turf Tavern in Scotia, NY. Call Jaclyn @ 518-390-6152 for more info.

Thursday, October 18, 2012 Pass it On: Estate Planning to Preserve Family Wealth
Presented by:  Thomas Donahue, Donahue Financial Management Group & Marion Hancock Fish, Partner; Hancock Estabrook LLP presented by NY Family Business Center. Time: 8:00 a.m. Registration; 8:15 – 9:30 a.m. Program. Location: 445 Electronics Parkway, Suite 206, Liverpool, NY 13088.   Registration Fee: NYFBC members Prepaid; Non Members $25.00. Registrations: Contact NYFBC at 315-579-2871 or dherlihy@nyfbc.org

October 19, 2012 Washington County Farm Bureau Annual Meetingat B & B on the Green in Hudson Falls, NY. Call Bill @ 518-935-8569 for more info.

Saturday, October 20th, Farming 101 from 9:00 am – 3:30 pm at Cornell Cooperative Extension of Saratoga County, 50 West High Street Ballston Spa, NY 12020. Cost is $30 for the day which includes a delicious lunch and educational handouts. Please RSVP by Oct. 17th to Kirk Shoen, Cornell Cooperative Extension of Rensselaer County at 518-272-4210 ext. 113 or by email to kjs264@cornell.edu. Cornell Cooperative Extension of Rensselaer and Saratoga Counties will provide information on a wide range of topics targeted at small farms that raise beef, poultry, sheep and goats. The topics will include: farm business management, tax exemptions and laws, business development, proper animal selection, animal care, as well as proper pasture and field management. There will be agriculture educators on hand to answer all of your questions.

October 20, 2012- October 21, 2012. Farm Hack Ithaca. Ithaca, NY. Topics covered will include grain production and small-scale processing, on-farm innovations from Ithaca area farmers. There will also be a demo build of Scrap Laundry Greens Spinner and CoolBot Cooler. For more information, or to register, visit http://www.youngfarmers.org/practical/farm-hack/events/ithaca/.

Tuesday,October 23,2012 TaxPlanningSeminars by Farm Credit East from 7:00–9:00PM. Location: LitchfieldFSAOffice, 1185NewLitchfieldSt, Torrington,CT06790. Pleasecall1-800-362-4404,byWednesday, October17,2012,toreserveyourseat.  Youdonotwant tomissoutonthis information! Withthetaxlaws settosunsetasofDecember31,2012,properTAX PLANNINGshouldbeaPRIORITYwitheachandeverybusinessand tax payerthisyear.

October 24, 2012 Fall Field Meetinghosted by Swartz Dairy & Produce and Capital District Vegetable & Small Fruit Program from 2:00 to 4:00 p.m. at Swartz Dairy & Produce, 1532 Eleanor Drive, Castleton NY (off Exit 12 of Route 90). The meeting will focus on variety trials featuring over 30 varieties of pumpkins & decorative squash.

October 24, 2012 The 2012 New York State Nursery Landscape Leadership Forum
ILR at Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853. This year’s event offers you a wonderful opportunity to experience the Cornell University campus and learn best practices for growing a successful business. The program will be geared to owners and staff. Don’t miss this opportunity to build relationships with other green industry professionals from across the state.

Sessions will include:

Growing a Successful Landscape Business -Landscape Management Network, George Urvari, President and CEO of Oriole Landscape.

Eco-business Strategies for Nurseries and Landscapes in Response to the New NYS

Environmental Regulatory Laws – Dr. Jenny Kao-Kniffin, Assistant Professor of Urban Weed Ecology, Cornell University

Tree Root System Development from Container to Field – Dr. Taryn Bauerle, Assistant Professor of Root Biology, Cornell University.

Review and Preview of Landscape Diseases – Dr.George Hudler, Professor of Plant Pathology and Plant-Microbe Biology, Cornell University

 October 25, 2012 Apple Jelly and Pie Filling – Food Preservation Workshopsat CCE-Westport, NY. Registration is $10/person, class size is limited. Call 518-962-4810 ext. 401

 October 26-27, 2012. Value Added Institute: Food Processing Workshops. Canajoharie, NY. NY Small Scale Food Processors Association, in conjunction with Montgomery County Agriculture Development, is offering a variety of workshops focused on increasing the value of produce and meat products. For more information, contact Toni Christman at mcswcd4001@frontier.com.

October 27, 2012 Cheese Making 101 – for Beginners & Novices
Location:Brovetto’s Dairy Farm/Harpersfield Cheese 1677 County Highway 29, Jefferson, NY 12093 Class limited to fifteen (15) persons – $100/person. Discount for Guild Members (scholarships available). Lunch is included. For registration contact Linda Smith at 607.829.8852 or email the Guild at info@nyfarmcheese.org   Participants learn how to make three (3) to four (4) styles of cheese with expert Cheese Makers during this full-day session. Feel free to bring your own farmstead milk.

October 27th and 28th, 2012 Game of Logging: Professional level chainsaw safety trainingfor farmers and landowners being sponsored by Washington County SWCD and Ag Stewardship Association and funded in part with a Farm Credit East Ag Enhancement grant. Class will meet from 8 am to 4 pm at 190 North Road in Greenwich, NY. Lunch will be provided as well as hot and cold beverages. The sizes of the classes are restricted to ten people per instructor so we will have the capacity for 20 trainees per day. So, if you plan on attending this valuable training, register early at agstewardship.org to reserve your place. For those without computer access you may call the District at 518-692-9940 ext 123 or ASA at 518-692-7285.

October 30, 2012 New York Feed Dealers Seminar at 10:00 A.M. in the 4-H Training Center, 556 Middle Line Rd, Ballston Spa, NY 12020.Cost: $15/per person (includes lunch) RSVP by October 26 to 518-885-8995 or email WLM8@cornell.eduSpeakers: Dr. L.E. Chase, Dept. of Animal Science, Cornell University and Dr. T.R. Overton, Dept. of Animal Science, Cornell University.Topics: Feeding Considerations for 2012 -2013; NRCS Pilot Feed Management Project – What Did We Learn?; Nutritional Implications for Post-calving Uterine Health and Reproduction; Key Opportunities for the New York Dairy Industry

Oct. 31, 2012 Vat Pasteurizer Workshop, CCE with NYS Ag & Mkts, in Stocking Hall, Ithaca, NY. Contact Rob Ralya 607-255-7643 or Janene Lucia 607-255-2892 for more info.

November
Thursday,November 1,2012 TaxPlanningSeminars by Farm Credit Eastfrom 7:00–9:00PM. Location: FarmCreditEast,ACA, 190StateRoute9H, Hudson,NY12534. Pleasecall1-800-362-4404,byWednesday, October17,2012,toreserveyourseat.  Youdonotwant tomissoutonthis information! Withthetaxlaws settosunsetasofDecember31,2012,properTAX PLANNINGshouldbeaPRIORITYwitheachandeverybusinessand tax payerthisyear.

November 7-8, 2012 Northeast Greenhouse Conference and Expo at DCU Center, Worcester, MA. Join other growers and retailers for the largest nationally recognized floriculture industry show in New England! This biennial event is co-sponsored by New England Floriculture, Inc.,—a group of grower representatives from the Northeast, augmented by University and Cooperative Extension staff in each state who specialize in greenhouse crops and management. For conference registration or hotel reservation information visit: www.nysta.org or contact the NYSTA office at 518-783-1229; turfandgrounds@nysta.org.

November 8, 2012 Basic Farm Business Management Planning 6:00 – 8:30 p.m. at CCE-Albany Cty. 24 Martin Road, Voorheesville, NY. Helping your farm business achieve success. Registration is $25. For more info contact Gale at 518-765-3500 or Sandy Buxton 518-380-1498 or sab22@cornell.edu.

November 12-14, 2012 Penn State Dairy Cattle Nutrition Conferenceat Holiday Inn, Grantville, PA. Registration fee required. For more information contact Coleen Jones at 540-997-5809 or cmj11@psu.edu . A pre-conference symposium will discuss how to identify bottlenecks to performance. Regular meeting will delve into trace mineral supplementation’s impact on management parameters, along with hot topics in the world of silage and transition cow performance.

Nov. 15, 2012 4th Annual Cover Crop Tour and Workshop, at the USDA NRCS Big Flats Plant Materials Center.  For additional information contact paul.salon@ny.usda.gov or by calling 607-562-8404. There will be a morning field tour. Let us know if you have special needs. Please bring $10.00 to cover the cost of lunch. 4.00 CCA credits available Registration will start at 9:15am, and the field tour begins at 9:45am.

There may be a (to be confirmed) demonstration of an innovative, no-till inter-row cover crop seeder from Penn. State. Supported by an NRCS Conservation Innovation Grant. As in the year’s past, we will have a morning tour at the Plant Materials Center, 3266 State Route 352, Big Flats, NY, and then travel to the Big Flats Community Center, immediately after. 

REGISTRATION LINK: http://events.constantcontact.com/register/event?llr=7ex5qzeab&oeidk=a07e6elpb3817b400b3

Hosted by the USDA-NRCS Plant Materials Program in cooperation with the Upper Susquehanna Coalition, Empire State Chapter Soil and Water Conservation Society and Cornell Cooperative Extension.

November 15th 2012  Harvesting Opportunities: Growing Local Food Economies & Protecting Farmland.  Hotel Albany, Albany, NY. For more details go to:  www.farmland.org/newyork. Or call 518-581-0078. A Conference to Inspire and Educate New Yorkers to Support Agriculture, Strengthen Local Farm and Food Economies and Get Involved in Protecting Farmland.  Keynote Speaker: Verlyn Klinkenborg, author The Rural Life and Making Hay.  This conference will bring together farmers, public officials, land trusts and local food and public health leaders to take a serious look at the potential to grow New York’s economy by strengthening connections between farmers and local consumers and protecting our state’s irreplaceable farmland.

November 19, 2012 Webinar – Diagnosing Problems in Nutrition Programs through Records. Presented by Greg Bethard, North Carolina State University. Webinar will commence at 1:00 p.m. Eastern time. Register at http://bit.ly/Hoards-Xwebs.

December
December 4, 2012 Basic Farm Business Management Planning6:00 – 8:30 p.m. at CCE-Columbia Cty. 479 Route 66, Hudson, NY. Helping your farm business achieve success. Registration is $25. For more info contact Gale at 518-765-3500 or Sandy Buxton 518-380-1498 or sab22@cornell.edu.

December 3-7, 2012 Cider and Perry Production classwith Cornell Cooperative Extension and NYS Ag Exp. Station, 630 W. North Street, Geneva, NY 14456. Registration for whole event is $950, or Part 1 is $400. Contact Gemma Osborne at 315-787-2248 or gro2@cornell.edu . The class is taught by world’s leading experts in cider production.

December 7, 2012 Webinar – Feeding Systems for Group-Housed Calves. Presented by Mark Thomas, DVM, Countryside Veterinary Clinic.  Webinar will commence at 1:00 p.m. Eastern time. Register at http://bit.ly/Hoards-Xwebs .  December 11, 2012 Labor Issues for Ag Employersfrom 9:30 a.m. -3:30 p.m. at Century House, Latham, NY. Registration is $65/person (with an early discount $55 if received by 11/28/2012). To register call Gale at 518-765-3500 or Sandy 518-380-1498 or sab22@cornell.edu . The link to the registration form and flyer  is:  http://bit.ly/2012Labor

December 12, 2012 Field Crop Dealer Meeting, Genesee Grand Hotel, Syracuse, NY, 1 -5pm
This meeting is for industry representatives, consultants and retail dealers to provide information on Cornell field crops research and recommendations. Pre-register for the Field Crop Dealer Meeting online at http://nysaba.com/meeting_registration. There is a $15 registration fee for the meeting. DEC pesticide applicator credits and CCA continuing education credits will be requested.    A tentative agenda for the 2012 Field Crop Dealer Meeting can be found at: http://fieldcrops.org/Calendar/Documents/2012%20FCDM%20Agenda.pdf.
Please contact Mary McKellar at mem40@cornell.edu if you have any questions.

Thursday, December 13, 2012 Annual Tax Law Update – Changes Affecting Privately Owned Businessfrom NY Family Business Center. Time: 8:00 a.m. Registration; 8:15 – 9:30 a.m. Program. Location: 445 Electronics Parkway, Suite 206, Liverpool, NY 13088.   Registration Fee: NYFBC members Prepaid; Non Members $25.00. Registrations: Contact NYFBC at 315-579-2871 or dherlihy@nyfbc.org

December 12-13, 2012 Group-Housed Dairy Calf Systems Conferenceat Doubletree Hotel, Syracuse, New York.      Hold the date for this innovative symposium designed to provide progressive dairy producers and agriservice personnel the opportunity to increase their knowledge of dairy calf group housing systems and feeding technologies. An evening session on December 12 is designed specifically for producers who have just converted to a group feeding system.       For more information, visit www.ansci.cornell.edu/prodairy/calfsystems

Tuesday, December 18, 2012,– Improving Your Business With On-Farm Research-at The Century House, Rte 9 Latham from 9:30 am – 3:30 pm.  Learn how to do your own on-farm research and how to participate in state-wide research projects with Cornell faculty.  We will discuss the skills, knowledge, and management it takes to do on-farm research.  Put on by Capital Area Agriculture and Horticulture Program.  Mark your calendars.  Registration information is forthcoming.  Contact Aaron Gabriel if you have questions, adg12@cornell.edu, 518-380-1496.

 Tuesday, December 18, 2012 Cornell’s Agri-Business Outlook Conference at Statler Ballroom, Ithaca, NY. For more info contact: Carol Thomson at 607-255-5464 or cmt8@cornell.edu. .

 January 2013
Jan. 2, 2013  Meat Processing and Food Safety Certificate Programat SUNY Cobleskill. For more info, contact 518.255.5528 or email serdyml@cobleskill.edu . This 4-unit, intensive hands-on training program is designed to provide the knowledge and skills students require to enter employment in the meat processing industry. Students will be skilled in sanitation, food safety, slaughter, meat cutting and processing. As part of the students’ preparation for the industry, the program consists of specialized training in the accuracy of cutting, knife handling, portion control, merchandising and the utilization of all products. Hands-on training in meat animal slaughter, primal fabrication, retail cutting, value-added products (sausage), wrapping and storage of finished product. Safety, sanitation including USDA HACCP (Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point), customer relations from custom cutting to product pick up and invoicing will be part of this program.

January 12, 2012Basic Farm Business Management Planning 9:30 a.m. to noon at CCE-Washington Cty. 415 Lower Main St, Hudson Falls, NY. Helping your farm business achieve success. Registration is $25. For more info contact Gale at 518-765-3500 or Sandy Buxton 518-380-1498 or sab22@cornell.edu.

January 16, 2013 Organic Turf & Landscape (a “Be Green” credit course) with Cornell Cooperative Extension- Rensselaer County, 61 State Street, Troy, NY 12180. Time: TBA

Cornell Cooperative Extension horticulture staff will present the latest on managing turfgrass and landscapes using organic methods. Participants will receive credits applicable to maintaining a current Be Green license agreement with the NYSDEC. Registration required. For more information contact Chuck Schmitt at cds34@cornell.edu and 518-765-3513 or David Chinery at dhc3@cornell.edu and 518-272-4210.

January 16 – 17, 2013 Operations Managers Conference “Managing for Consistency and Continuous Improvement” at RIT Inn and Conference Center, Henrietta, New York 
This conference provides an opportunity for people responsible for day to day activities to increase their management and operations skills while interacting with other managers. Sessions on January 16 will be followed by a tour and interaction with a local dairy operations team on January 17. For more information, visit www.ansci.cornell.edu/prodairy/OMC/

January 22-24, 2013 Empire State Producers Expo, OnCenter, Syracuse, NY. For more info visit: www.nysvga.org/expo/info 

January 25-26, 2013 5th Annual Winter Green-up Grazing Conferenceat the Century House Conference Center, Latham, NY. For more information, please contact Gale Kohler at CCE Albany County by phone at (518) 765-3500 or gek4@cornell.edu.  You can also reach Morgan Hartman at blackqueenangus@yahoo.com

     There is a terrific lineup of informed and informative, experienced practitioner/speakers:

  • Steve Kenyon, a Holistic Management Educator/practitioner from Saskatchewan, Canada.  Steve will discuss, in two separate sessions, the business and the practice of custom grazing cattle for profit.  Additionally, Steve will touch upon Winter Management techniques that will have direct application to those of us in the cold Northeast. 
  • Jerry Brunetti, one of the original organizers of the PASA conference and founder of Agri-Dynamics, a dairy nutritionist and an expert in human nutrition too, is going to discuss these two intimately related topics of animal and human health.  If we are what we eat, then we are what our animals eat. 
  • Jeremy Engh owns and runs Lakota Ranch in Virginia as well as running the Lakota Bull Test, an all-forage/grazing test for beef breed bulls.  While Jeremy is a Red Devon breeder and grass-finisher, the Lakota Bull Test accepts bulls from all beef breeds and measures their performance in contemporary groups, while also conducting Breeding Soundness Exams and other pertinent pre-breeding season data collection.  All this data is then provided to the bull owner/consignors and to the prospective customers of the Lakota Bull Test Sale.
  • Paul and Phyllis Van Amburgh, who own and operate Dharma Lea Farm in Sharon Springs, NY will discuss their approach to animal production on their Certified Organic, 100% grass-fed farm where they produce grass-fed beef along side their year round grass-fed dairy. 
  • Dr. tatiana Stanton, NY State’s Small Ruminant Specialist will talk about her initial research into applied pasture lambing and how the results compare to jug lambing.  tatiana will talk about these and other matters relating specifically to the pasture rearing and finishing of goats and sheep.

January 29, 2013 Bedding Plant Conference with CCE at The Century House, 997 New Loudon Road, (Route 9), Latham, NY 12110. Learn about innovations in greenhouse production, pest management, organic fertilization and other trends. DEC pesticide credits applied for. For more information contact Chuck Schmitt at cds34@cornell.edu and 518-765-3513.

 February
February 5 -7 & 12 – 14, 2013 30-Hour Pesticide Class for Category 3a & 25 with Cornell Cooperative ExtensionRensselaer County, 61 State Street, Troy, NY 12180. Cornell Cooperative Extension horticulture staff of the Capital District will present a six day class to become licensed pesticide applicators. Successful completion of the thirty-hour training course and exams will allow participants to be licensed by the NYSDEC as Certified Pesticide Applicators. Registration required. For more information contact Chuck Schmitt at cds34@cornell.edu and 518-765-3513 or David Chinery at dhc3@cornell.edu and  518-272-4210.

 February 7, 2013Basic Farm Business Management Planning 6:00-8:30 p.m. at CCE-Washington Cty. 415 Lower Main St, Hudson Falls, NY. Helping your farm business achieve success. Registration is $25. For more info contact Gale at 518-765-3500 or Sandy Buxton 518-380-1498 or sab22@cornell.edu.

 February 11th, 2013 Lake George Fruit School, Lake George NY. Call Kevin Iungerman at 518-885-8995 for more info.

 February 12-13, 2013, Hudson Valley Tree Fruit School, Kingston, NY.

 February 14, 2013, Hudson Valley Grape & Berry School, Kingston, NY.

 February 27, 2013, Capital District Annual Vegetable and Small Fruit Winter Meeting, Albany, NY.

 March
March 6, 7 & 19, 2013 CNLP (Certified Nursery Landscape Professional) Review Session with Cornell Cooperative Extension – Albany County, 24 Martin Road, Voorheesville, NY 12186.A 2-day review session and exam. Topics include botany, soils, and plant identification. This review session will prepare students for the CNLP exam. Registration required. For more information about the training and the CNLP program, contact Chuck Schmitt at cds34@cornell.edu and 518-765-3513.

March 22, 2013 Pesticide Recertification Day with CCE at The Century House, 997 New Loudon Road, (Route 9), Latham, NY 12110. Learn the latest on pesticide use, safety, and pest management for the upcoming season. This program features up to 6 DEC recertification credits. Morning sessions offer core credits and afternoon sessions offer category specific credits for 3a,1a,7a and private categories as well. Registration required. For more information contact Chuck Schmitt at cds34@cornell.edu
 

OPPORTUNITIES
Available: Spanish Handbook for Employers
A Spanish version of the Handbook for Employers (M-274), Instructions for Completing Form I-9 (Employment Eligibility Verification Form) is now available. Just like the Handbook for Employers (M-274) in English (http://www.uscis.gov/files/form/m-274.pdf), the Spanish Handbook for Employers (M-274)(http://www.uscis.gov/USCIS-ES/files/forms/m-274_spanish.pdf) gives comprehensive answers to your Form I-9 questions. To better serve our Spanish speaking customers, the Spanish Handbook for Employers  includes instructions on how to complete, and retain Form I-9, provides lists of acceptable employment authorization and identity documents, and gives specific guidance for recruiters.

A couple of new resources for producers direct marketing live cattle for custom harvest or producers direct marketing beef cuts. – Tennessee Value-Added Beef Webinar Series

Anyone interested is invited to join for a series of webinars made possible by the Southern Risk Management Center, the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture and University of Tennessee Extension.

Webinars will be held the 2nd and 4th Tuesdays of the month beginning in October and running through March from 6:30 pm to 8 pm Central.(7:30 – 9 p.m. Eastern)

To receive a link by email to join each webinar, send an email to cpa@utk.eduwith the following information:

  • Name, County (or State if not in Tennessee), Email Address

Schedule of Tennessee Value-Added Beef Webinars

Date Topic(s)
October 9, 2012 Begin With the End in Mind: An Introduction to the Market, Potential Customers, Opportunities and Challenges of Value-Added Beef
October 23, 2012 What You Need to Know to Market Live Animals for Custom Harvest: Navigating Regulations and Analyzing the Potential for Profit
November 13, 2012 Basic Regulations for Marketing Beef to Consumers and Wholesale (Retail Meat Sales Permit, Weights and Measures, Nutritional Labeling, Wholesale Registration)
November 27, 2012 Pencil Out Your Potential and Plan for Success: Conducting Financial Analysis and Developing a Business Plan
December 11, 2012 Circling the Wagons: Managing the Legal Risk of Direct Marketing Beef
December 25, 2012 -No Webinar Scheduled-
January 8, 2013 Marketing: It’s Not Magic, It’s Mandatory
January 22, 2013 Making Special Claims About Your Beef On the Label and Off
February 12, 2013 What You Should Know About Your Product
February 26, 2013 What You Should Know About Your Product (continued) and Become Sales Tax Savvy
March 12, 2013 Developing Effective Marketing Materials and Tools
March 26, 2013 Resource Round-up: Available Resources for Local Beef Marketers

We have also created a Google Group for discussion of Tennessee Value-Added Beef issues, news and resources. If you would like to join, please send an email from the address you would like to see updates at to TN-Value-Added-Beef+subscribe@googlegroups.com

Questions? Contact Megan Bruch, marketing specialist with the Center for Profitable Agriculture, at mlbruch@utk.eduor (931) 486-2777.

 

October 15, 2012
by mem40@cornell.edu
Comments Off on NYS IPM Weekly Field Crops Pest Report – October 12, 2012

NYS IPM Weekly Field Crops Pest Report – October 12, 2012

This newsletter is on-line at: www.nysipm.cornell.edu/lfc/tag/pestrpt/index.html

In this issue:

  1. View from the Field
  2. Weather Outlook
  3. Clipboard Checklist
  4. Contact Information

 

View from the Field
The Weekly Field Crops Pest Report is coming to an end for 2012. This will be the last issue of the season. This was a very active year for pest issues on field crops including true armyworm at epidemic levels, potato leafhopper at epidemic levels, grey leaf spot, northern corn leaf blight, a new virus “soybean vein necrosis virus” found statewide, sudden death syndrome in soybeans, etc.  Many Extension Educators, Cornell Faculty, field scouts, and industry personnel contributed with observations photos and even articles. The importance of these inputs cannot be over emphasized for their enhancements to the timely value of the report.

We will soon be sending our subscribers a survey via email to solicit feedback regarding perspectives on the usefulness of this publication to your efforts and suggestions for how to improve the report next season. We hope you will take time to complete and return the survey. We take your comments and suggestions seriously and have incorporated many of your suggestions to improve the publication over the years. Thank you for your interest. Hopefully we will see you next year!

 

Reaching the finish line – Some final steps?
Keith Waldron, NYS IPM              
Harvest is upon us and it’s getting close to the time where the crops will be in the bin, bale, or tucked in for the winter. Remember the pre-season planning, early season warm up, the planting scramble, its successes and challenges, the late spring frost, true armyworms, drought, potato leafhopper, deer and birds, crop diseases, equipment issues, etc.? The list goes on….

Every year is different and hopefully we’ve learned something new. While this summer is still fresh in mind it’s a great exercise to ask yourself a few key questions to review what went right and what went wrong this season… Take a few minutes to capture season highlights, lessons learned, and other facts and observations while updating your crop records and field histories. A sharp pencil is much better than a dull memory! Based on what happened this year, it’s a good bet there are at least some things you know you could do or change to improve your farm’s performance next year.

Some questions to get started: How well did the weed control program work? Were you satisfied with the performance of the varieties and hybrids used? Were field “problems” identified correctly? Were there any new crop diseases? Were any problems only found in certain fields or areas within fields? Thoughts on why? Were areas sampled? How effective was your early warning or rapid response system – i.e. were you able to head off situations before they hurt yield or quality? Did you run into anything new or unusual? Were there any fields with yields much lower or higher than expected?  Any thoughts on why? How effective were any pest management actions taken? Did you have any check (no treat) areas to evaluate effectiveness of any pest management actions taken? Were there major successes, or do some areas need improvement?

Documenting your crop protection decisions and their effects provides critical feedback for assessing the value and impact of actions taken and for optimizing future management decisions. Did they make or save you money?  Are there any “action items” to put on the “To Do” list to improve your pest management next season?  Which activities / actions worked well?….stick with them. Which practices were less than successful? Why?….improve them, or replace them.  Is there any new information available?….evaluate and incorporate. What’s the question(s) you will bring to the next grower meeting?

Hope these suggestions have been helpful. There certainly has been a variety of pests to write about this year. Ken and I have really enjoyed working on this years’ Weekly Field Crop Pest Report and hope you have found the report helpful.

We wish you a safe, bountiful and profitable harvest season! Until next year!

 

Weather Outlook October 11, 2012
Jessica Rennells, NOAA Northeast Regional Climate Center, Cornell University

Last week temperatures ranged from 0 to over 3 degrees above normal for most of the state, western NY was 0 to 3 degrees below normal.  Rainfall amounts ranged from a trace to 2 inches; the highest amounts were in the Great Lakes, St Lawrence Valley, and Northern Plateau regions. The Base 50 growing degree-days ranged from 25 to 50, less than 25 in the Adirondack region.

Today will be sunny with temperatures in the 50’s.  A few lingering showers will move out of the area by midday.  Overnight temperatures will be in the low 30’s to low 40’s. Friday will be mostly cloudy with scattered showers as a cold front moves through early in the day, then some clearing.   Highs will be in the mid 40’s to low 50’s.  Lows will be in 20’s – widespread frost is expected.  (end of growing season everywhere) Saturday will be sunny with temperatures ranging in the 50’s, still below normal.  Lows will range from the mid 30’s to low 40’s.  Some showers are expected Saturday night associated with a warm front. Sunday highs will be in the upper 50’s to mid 60’s with scattered showers.  Overnight temperatures will be in the upper 40’s to low 50’s. Monday will mostly cloudy with temperatures in the upper 50’s to mid 60’s and a chance for scattered showers.  Lows will be in the mid 30’s to low 40’s.. Tuesday will be partly sunny with temperatures in the upper 50’s to low 60’s.  Lows will be in the mid 30’s to low 40’s. Wednesday will be partly sunny with temperatures in the low to mid 60’s.  Lows will be in the upper 30’s to low 40’s..

The five-day precipitation amounts will range from 1/10 of an inch to 1 inch. The 8-14 day (Oct 18-24) out look is showing above normal temperatures and precipitation.  Drought Monitor update:  The depiction of abnormally dry conditions (D0) across the Great Lakes region of New York was modified in response to light-to-moderate rains (0.5 -1.5 inches).  Near the eastern shores of Lake Ontario, the area of D0 was trimmed, while slight expansion was included just east of the Rochester area.

Maps of 8-14 day outlooks:
http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/predictions/814day/index.php

National Weather Service watch/warnings map:
http://www.erh.noaa.gov/er/hq/

NRCC Drought Page which features the US Drought Monitor map (updated every Thursday):
http://www.nrcc.cornell.edu/page_drought.html

 

Clipboard Checklist
Keith Waldron, NYS IPM Program

General

  • Emergency contact information (“911”, local hospital, Chem. Spill emergency contact, other?) posted in central posting area
  • Maintain crop records by field, including variety, planting date, pesticides used, nutrient inputs including manure, etc.
  • End of Season weed survey, watch for any patches of herbicide resistant weeds, weed escapes
  • Storage areas cleaned and ready to accept hay, soybean, corn harvests

 Field Corn

  • Note presence of foliar diseases, stalk rots and ear mold
  • Check for Europeancorn borer, Western bean cutworm, foliar diseases (such as Gray Leaf spot and Northern Corn leaf blight), vertebrate injury (birds / deer), slugs, weed escapes, etc.
  • Monitor weed populations noting presence of “who”, “how many” and “where”
  • Document crop yields, note areas of particular interest (high, low yields, etc.)

 Alfalfa & Hay

  • Monitor alfalfa seedings for weeds & diseases.
  • Check established alfalfa stands for weed and disease problems.
  • Check established alfalfa stands for signs of alfalfa snout beetle infestations in counties known to have this pest.
  • Storage areas cleaned and ready to accept next harvest?

 Soybeans

  • Document crop yields, note areas of particular interest (high, low yields, etc.)
  • Evaluate stand for deer, weed assessment, white mold, foliar disease incidence, harvest

 Dairy Cattle: Livestock Barn Fly Management

  • Monitor animals and facilities for house fly and stable fly populations
  • Check facilities forfavorable fly breeding conditions: (organic matter + moisture): leaks in watering systems, roof gutters for leaks and potential overspill, drainage,
  • Sanitation, sanitation, sanitation – clean animal resting areas, feed troughs, minimize source of moist organic matter i.e. fly breeding areas in barn and in adjacent animal loafing yard
  • Expect slight increase of flies in the barn as weather cools
  • Use, replenish, replace fly management materials: sticky fly tapes/ribbons, insecticide baits, natural enemies (parasitoids), fly population monitoring (3 x 5) spot cards

 Dairy Cattle: Pasture Fly Management

  • Monitor animals for presence of face flies, horn flies and stable flies. Action guidelines: face flies (average 10 per animal face), horn flies (average 50 / dairy, 200 / beef cattle per animal side), stable flies average 10 per animal  (all four legs)
  • Check feed bunk / water source locations for signs of stable fly breeding (moist undisturbed organic matter – spilled feed, round bales, etc.), minimize source of moist organicmatter i.e. fly breeding areas in barn and in adjacent animal loafing yard
  • Check paddocks for forage quality / quantity, rotate as appropriate
  • Check paddocks for vegetation poisonous to livestock
  • Consider use of fly traps to help reduce deer, horse and stable fly populations

 Storage

  • Pre-clean in and around grain storage bins in anticipation of soybean and grain corn harvests.
  • Keep areas around storage bins and silos clean and mowed
  • Monitor temperature and moisture of bin stored grains

 Equipment

  • Note any repairs needed for recently used equipment: tractors, tillage implements, harvesting equipment, etc. as they are cleaned and serviced.
  • Calibrate manure spreaders – maintain records on amount spread per field

 

Contact Information
Keith Waldron: NYS Livestock and Field Crops IPM Coordinator
Phone: (315) 787 – 2432 Fax: (315) 787-2360
Email: jkw5@cornell.edu

Ken Wise: Eastern: NYS IPM Area Educator: Field Crops and Livestock
Phone: (518) 434-1690 Fax: (518) 426-3316
Email: klw24@cornell.edu

October 11, 2012
by mem40@cornell.edu
Comments Off on New York State Weekly Weather Outlook – October 11, 2012

New York State Weekly Weather Outlook – October 11, 2012

Jessica Rennells
NOAA Northeast Regional Climate Center, Cornell University

Last week temperatures ranged from 0 to over 3 degrees above normal for most of the state, western NY was 0 to 3 degrees below normal.  Rainfall amounts ranged from a trace to 2 inches; the highest amounts were in the Great Lakes, St Lawrence Valley, and Northern Plateau regions. The Base 50 growing degree-days ranged from 25 to 50,  les than 25 in the Adirondack region.

Today will be sunny with temperatures in the 50’s.  A few lingering showers will move out of the area by midday.  Overnight temperatures will be in the low 30’s to low 40’s.

Friday will be mostly cloudy with scattered showers as a cold front moves through early in the day, then some clearing.   Highs will be in the mid 40’s to low 50’s.  Lows will be in 20’s – widespread frost is expected.  (end of growing season everywhere)

Saturday will be sunny with temperatures ranging in the 50’s, still below normal.  Lows will range from the mid 30’s to low 40’s.  Some showers are expected Saturday night associated with a warm front.

Sunday highs will be in the upper 50’s to mid 60’s with scattered showers.  Overnight temperatures will be in the upper 40’s to low 50’s.

Monday will mostly cloudy with temperatures in the upper 50’s to mid 60’s and a chance for scattered showers.  Lows will be in the mid 30’s to low 40’s..

Tuesday will be partly sunny with temperatures in the upper 50’s to low 60’s.  Lows will be in the mid 30’s to low 40’s.

Wednesday will be partly sunny with temperatures in the low to mid 60’s.  Lows will be in the upper 30’s to low 40’s..

The five-day precipitation amounts will range from 1/10 of an inch to 1 inch. The 8-14 day (Oct 18-24) out look is showing above normal temperatures and precipitation.  Drought Monitor update:  The depiction of abnormally dry conditions (D0) across the Great Lakes region of New York was modified in response to light-to-moderate rains (0.5 -1.5 inches).  Near the eastern shores of Lake Ontario, the area of D0 was trimmed, while slight expansion was included just east of the Rochester area.

Maps of 8-14 day outlooks
http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/predictions/814day/index.php

National Weather Service watch/warnings map
http://www.erh.noaa.gov/er/hq/

NRCC Drought Page which features the US Drought Monitor map (updated every Thursday)
http://www.nrcc.cornell.edu/page_drought.html

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