Cornell Field Crops News

Timely Field Crops information for the New York Agricultural Community

January 22, 2016
by Jennifer Thomas-Murphy
Comments Off on New York Farm Show to Host Precision Ag Decision-Making Program

New York Farm Show to Host Precision Ag Decision-Making Program

Precision ag program on Feb. 25, by the NYFVI steering committee, tackles using the technology for profitable decision-making.

Really want to harness precision ag technology for profit? Then don’t miss the “Precision Ag: Decision-making for a profitable future” program.  That’s the theme driving a fast-moving afternoon seminar on Thursday, Feb. 25, at the 2016 New York Farm Show. The program, developed by New York Farm Viability Institute’s precision ag steering committee, will be a strong mix of keen farmer experience and ag industry expertise, says NYFVI Executive Director Dave Grusenmeyer.

Here’s a quick summary of the program that begins with registration and refreshments at 2:30 p.m. in the Bistro Room at the State Fairgrounds’ Arts and Home Center. Certified crop advisers are eligible for 2.5 continuing education units.

2:50 p.m.: Welcome and introductions

3:00 p.m.: Precision Ag basics, opportunities and industry trends:

Cornell University’s Harold Van Es will cover concepts supporting precision management of crop inputs in field crop and horticultural systems, plus enabling technologies. He’ll home in on greatest opportunity areas and new technologies enhancing precision
management.

3:20 p.m.: Hardware and software capabilities, and options:

* Evaluating the data collected over the growing season (planting, soil testing, yield, application, Feed Quality from JD Harvest Lab) and interpreting big data in desktop software setting to provide real information from which the grower can either streamline record keeping for FSA/Crop Insurance and/or understand what practices are making a profit on their farm. Winter planning allows optimization of the crop season to best fit your agronomic and profit practices.
* Harvest tech tools to document production is the topic for Erick Haas, integrated solutions specialist for Cazenovia Equipment Company. He’ll demonstrate the value of yield maps/data and it be used to improve farm operation efficiency.

4:00 p.m.: Cost and benefits of entry-point tech:

That’s the topic tackled by Hass and John Hanchar, from Cornell’s Northwest dairy and field crops team. Haas will give an overview of auto-steer technology and important points to consider. John Hanchar will review auto-steer’s expected financial impacts via partial budgeting and capital investment analysis.

4:20 p.m.: Optimizing variable-rate seeding tech:

Savanna Crossman, precision ag research coordinator for the N.Y. Corn and Soybean Growers Association will present a variable-rate seeding model to be farm-tested this year. It’s customized to vary prescription seeding rate by hybrid, soil type, topography, plus soil sample data.

4:40 p.m.: Precision ag survey summary:

Josh Woodard, The Dyson School at Cornell, will share results of a farmer survey on promising technologies, barriers to adoption, cost, labor concerns, plus educational and infrastructure needs.

4:50 p.m.: Grower panel:

Bruce Wright, SUNY Cobleskill, will moderate a panel discussion of precision tech experience with three products by three producers: Ag Leader by Travis Torrey of Torrey Farms; John Deere by Dan Shirley of North Harbor Dairy; and Trimble by
Joe Brightly, Brightly Farms.

The session closes with summary comments and door prize drawings.
Program sponsors include: Farm Credit East, New York Farm Viability, New York Corn and Soybean Growers Association, Cornell University, SUNY Cobleskill, Morrisville State College, Ag Leader, Trimble, Agrinetix, Cazenovia Equipment, Z & M Equipment, Soil Max, Clinton Tractor, Whites Farm Supply, and Empire Tractor of Cazenovia.

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January 20, 2016
by Jennifer Thomas-Murphy
Comments Off on NY Certified Organic Feb. 9 Meeting: Four Soil Health Presentations: Geneva Site Hosting Speakers; Four CCE Offices to Broadcast Locally

NY Certified Organic Feb. 9 Meeting: Four Soil Health Presentations: Geneva Site Hosting Speakers; Four CCE Offices to Broadcast Locally

Geneva, NY.  New York Organic Certified has announced three presentations and a farmer panel on managing soil health with crop rotations and forage production to be offered February 9 with speakers on site at the New York State Agricultural Experimental Station in Geneva, NY.  Cornell Cooperative Extension offices will broadcast the program via web connection in Canton, Morrisville, Warsaw and Westport.

The February 9 meeting is the second of three New York Certified Organic winter meetings.  Rick Pederson of Pederson Farms, Seneca Castle, NY, will present on Putting Soil Health Knowledge into Practice. Pederson manages 600 certified organic acres and an additional 900 acres under conventional production. He grows a diversified crop mix for wholesaling to buyers throughout the Northeast. He will talk about the crop rotations he has developed to provide income and at the same time build resilience in his soil.

Tom Kilcer of Advanced Ag Systems, Kinderhook, NY, will present his research on Alternative Forage Rotations to Protect the Soil on Marginal Land. Kilcer will share his data on double cropping with winter grains and summer annuals to keep the soil covered and allow fieldwork to be done when soils are more likely dry. He will also cover solutions to storing nitrogen for such a system in organic production.

In the Reducing Pasture Compaction with Daikon Radish session, NY Organic Dairy Initiative Project Manager and Cornell University South Central NY Regional Team Small Dairy Support Educator Fay Benson will share the results of planting brassicas in compacted areas of pastures after a very wet grazing season.

A farmer panel on How to Decide Whether to Sell Forages to Dairy Farmers or Plow Them In for Green Manure includes Thor Oechsner of Oechsner Farms, a 600-acre certified organic enterprise growing diversified grains in Newfield, NY. Oechsner is also a partner in Farmer Ground, a small cooperatively owned grain milling business in Trumansburg, NY.

The New York Crop Insurance Education Team, and Cornell Cooperative Extension provide support for these meetings. There will be a brief description of how crop insurance can benefit organic farmers at the February 9 and March 8 NYCO meetings.

The NYCO meetings begin at 10 AM in Jordan Hall at 630 West North Street at the New York State Agricultural Experimental Station in Geneva, NY. There is no cost or need to register to attend the program in Geneva that features presentations by and discussions with farmers from across New York State, crop and dairy consultants, Cornell University researchers, and Cornell Cooperative Extension educators. Participants are asked to bring a dish to pass at the potluck lunch.

Those interested in attending the February 9 NYCO program via website at an Extension office should contact that office directly as follows:

.  Canton: CCE of St. Lawrence County, 2043B State Highway 68, Kitty O’Neil, 315.379.9192 x253,

. Morrisville: CCE of Madison County, 100 Eaton Street, Katherine Brosnan, 315.684.3001,

. Warsaw: CCE of Wyoming County, 401 North Main Street, Zach Amey, 585.786.2251 x123, and

. Westport: CCE of Essex County, 3 Sisco Street, Anita Deming, 518.982.4180 x409.

For more information on New York Certified Organic, contact Fay Benson at 607.745.3807, afb3@cornell.edu.

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December 21, 2015
by Jennifer Thomas-Murphy
Comments Off on 2016 Cornell Guide for Integrated Field Crop Management Now Available

2016 Cornell Guide for Integrated Field Crop Management Now Available

Field Crops Guide CoverThe 2016 edition of the Cornell Guide for Integrated Field Crop Management is now available. This annual publication provides up-to-date field crop production information for New York State. It is designed as a practical guide for field crop producers, crop consultants, ag chemical dealers, and others who advise field crop producers.

In addition to the annual variety and pesticide updates, highlighted changes in this edition of the Field Crops Guide include:

  • A new section on spring malting barley, including field research trial data.
  • Revised forage fertilization guidelines to include sulfur fertilizers.
  • Updated corn, soybean, and wheat disease management tables.

The Cornell Guidelines are available as a print copy, online-only access, or a package that combines print and online access. The print edition of the 2016 Field Crops Guide costs $26 plus shipping. Online-only access is $26. A combination of print and online access costs $36.50 plus shipping costs for the printed book.

Cornell Guidelines can be obtained through your local Cornell Cooperative Extension office or from the Cornell Store at Cornell University. To order from the Cornell Store, call (800) 624-4080 or order online at http://store.cornell.edu/c-875-pmep-guidelines.aspx.

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December 16, 2015
by Jennifer Thomas-Murphy
Comments Off on Cornell Senior Wins NYSABA Seed Committee Outstanding Undergraduate Award

Cornell Senior Wins NYSABA Seed Committee Outstanding Undergraduate Award

NYSABA Seed Committee Chair John Uveges (right) and Cornell’s Margaret Smith present Andrew Lefever with the 2015 NYSABA Seed Committee Outstanding Undergraduate Award.

NYSABA Seed Committee Chair John Uveges (right) and Cornell’s Margaret Smith present Andrew Lefever with the 2015 NYSABA Seed Committee Outstanding Undergraduate Award.

Cornell senior Andrew Lefever of Lancaster County, Pennsylvania is the 2015 winner of the New York State Agribusiness Association (NYSABA) Outstanding Undergraduate Award. The Award was presented December 3, 2015 at the Cornell Seed School held in Geneva, NY.

The Award pays honor to one undergraduate student who has shown exceptional interest and dedication in study to the Agricultural Plant Industry particularly seed issues. Lefever is an Agricultural Sciences Major at Cornell University.  “For many years, the NY Seed Association, now a part of NYSABA, and the American Seed Trade Association (ASTA), have awarded this scholarship to an outstanding student(s) in the field of plant science or plant breeding who plan to pursue further education or employment in agriculture,” said John Uveges, NYSABA Seed Committee Chair. “We were very excited to award this to Andrew this year because he has a real passion for plant breeding and seed issues.

“While he didn’t grow up on a farm, Andrew talks passionately about the neighboring farms that formed his love of agriculture—from planting and harvesting corn, soybeans, and tobacco, to equipment experience,” notes his award nomination. “Andrew is passionate about agriculture, he’s first to volunteer to help with any need, he’s given countless hours to mentor younger agriculture students, he’s articulate, polite, and honestly one of the most outstanding Cornell citizens we’ve seen.”

He has spent his summers getting to know different aspects of the industry. His freshman summer he prepared soil samples for Agri-Analysis, Inc, an agricultural testing lab. His sophomore summer, he interned for DuPont Pioneer in Lancaster working in corn research. This past summer, he was a research assistant for Cornell’s SPEAR program working on nutrient management projects.

The scholarship is provided in partnership through NYSABA and the American Seed Trade Association (ASTA).

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November 9, 2015
by Jennifer Thomas-Murphy
Comments Off on NNYADP Snout Beetle Project Boosts Agribusinesses, Field Survey Underway

NNYADP Snout Beetle Project Boosts Agribusinesses, Field Survey Underway

Miller’s Spray Service applies nematodes at Moserdale Farm, Copenhagen, NY. Miller’s is one of several agribusinesses in northern NY that are benefitting from the Northern New York Agricultural Development Program-funded alfalfa snout beetle research project. Photo: NNYADP

Miller’s Spray Service applies nematodes at Moserdale Farm, Copenhagen, NY. Miller’s is one of several agribusinesses in northern NY that are benefitting from the Northern New York Agricultural Development Program-funded alfalfa snout beetle research project. Photo: NNYADP

Northern NY.  Regional agribusinesses are the latest beneficiaries of the nearly 30 years of research dedicated by the farmer-driven Northern New York Agricultural Development Program to finding a solution to alfalfa snout beetle, an invasive insect that threatens alfalfa crops highly valued by dairy and livestock producers.

Through the scientific discovery process, Cornell University entomologist Elson Shields and research support specialist Antonio Testa discovered native New York nematodes as a naturally occurring biological control for alfalfa snout beetle, ASB, and pioneered the use of the insect-attacking, microscopic worms to reduce beetle populations to manageable levels.

The two scientists also developed a farmer-friendly, low-labor nematode rearing and application methods for farm-built and commercial sprayer units.

With training from Shields and Testa, regional crop service agribusinesses are filling an economic gap by offering custom rearing and application of the nematodes between planting and harvesting seasons. One spray service in the northern NY is developing its own nematode rearing facility for use in 2016.

In 2015, cost-sharing offered by the Northern New York Agricultural Development Program helped farmers to apply the nematodes on their own or with assistance from Cornell Cooperative Extension personnel or to hire a commercial applicator.

Shields reports that 14 farms applied the biocontrol nematodes for the first time, treating 986 acres by participating in NNYADP cost-sharing to hire commercial applicators. A total of 4300 acres received nematodes in 2015.

‘We estimate a total of nearly 14,000 acres of alfalfa have been inoculated with the biocontrol nematodes in northern New York since 2007 when the first field application plots were established. With a large acreage of alfalfa grown in the known ASB infested area, a significant acreage remains in need of protection to help bring this insect under widespread management,’ Shields comments.

Agribusinesses Offer Service, Farmers Praise Research and Applicators

Native to northern New York, the nematodes are adapted to persist and spread under regional conditions for many years, making one application to a field sufficient to prompt crop protection.

‘When I heard Dr. Shields detail how the nematodes are helping to protect and restore alfalfa production, I saw the opportunity to protect farmer yields and investments with this service,’ says Aaron Miller of Miller’s Spray Service, Lowville, NY.

Miller has offered nematode applications for the past four years.

‘The cost-sharing offered by the Northern New York Agricultural Development Program in 2015 helped prompt farmers who would never think of applying the nematodes previously. With milk pricing challenging, the cost sharing offered them the chance to take advantage of the biocontrol by using our service,’ Miller says.

Miller says clients often report a quick return: “Particularly when we apply the nematodes to every acre, the farmers say they see instant results in production that year. When we apply to one-third of the acreage, the return is seen over four to five years as the nematodes naturally spread through the field.”

The nematodes must be applied on cloudy days or late in the day when they are less exposed to the UV light that is fatal to them. The nematodes also need time to enter the soil after surface application.

Windsong Dairy LLC in Adams Center, NY, applied nematodes for the first time in 2015. Crop Manager Cody Reynolds says, ‘The Northern New York research showed a science-based benefit to using the nematodes; that kind of information helps make our decisions. With access to custom applicators through the cost-sharing program, we made one call and application was made with their expertise at the right time.’

‘Our alfalfa acres represent half of our dairy diet. With snout beetle problems for years, we never could keep a stand of alfalfa before we started participating in the research trials. Now one application of the nematodes looks to have good results long term so we continue to apply them,’ says Doug Moser of Moserdale Farm, Copenhagen, NY.

As a critical component of the dairy cow diet, alfalfa is estimated at a value of $135 per ton of dry matter for milk production.

Lynn Murray of Murcrest Farm, Copenhagen, NY, began applications in earnest five years ago.

‘The outlook had become pretty bleak; our alfalfa seedings were half gone by the third year with none left by the fourth. The Northern New York Agricultural Development Program snout beetle project has paid dividends here. My 2015 alfalfa crop produced the best first cutting yield ever, and, with the nematode applications, we now have two fields producing more than 60 percent alfalfa into their sixth year,’ Murray says.

Franklin County Business Plans Its Own Nematode Rearing Lab

Mary DeBeer, a partner with her father Ronald in DeBeer Seeds and Spraying, Moira, NY, learned how to rear and apply nematodes in a workshop with Tony Testa. In 2014 Norco Farms, Hopkinton, provided them the proper environment to raise nematodes for application to 125 acres in Franklin County. In 2015, they applied nematodes to 435 acres located across six farms.

‘The Northern New York Agricultural Development Program research and training on this biocontrol has been very good for helping us cope with snout beetle as an increasing problem in the Malone area. Applying the nematodes is an added value service we can offer to help our farmers produce better alfalfa crops. I believe a lot of farmers do not have the time to make the applications on their own,’ Mary says.

With technical assistance from the Shields Lab at Cornell University, the DeBeers plan to establish their own nematode rearing lab in 2016.

Sales Manager Floyd Morter, based in Champlain, NY, with Bourdeau Bros., an ag products and services business serving farmers in New England and Quebec and Ontario, Canada, says, ‘Applying nematodes is a service fits after the spray and sidedress seasons have ended.’

Facility Manager Brent Phillips with Bourdeau Bros., Canton, NY, says, ‘We applied nematodes for the first time in 2015 at two farms. Although it was not a lot of work for us, extra acres are always a plus for the business to help keep people employed and the work added benefit to the farmers who have had problems with snout beetle.’

Other services that offered the biocontrol nematode application service in 2015 are Rudd Spray Service, Watertown, NY; and D and D Spray Service, Adams, NY.

ASB Range Survey Underway
To determine the current range of the alfalfa snout beetle, the Northern New York Agricultural Development Program is funding the updating of the ASB range map first developed eight years ago. Growers and Cornell Cooperative Extension Field Crops Specialists are scouting in Clinton, Essex, Franklin, Jefferson, Lewis and St. Lawrence counties. The pest also exists in three other counties in New York State and in southeastern Ontario, Canada.

‘Every year we find new infestations. If a neighboring farm has snout beetle, there is a high likelihood that ASB is present in your alfalfa,’ says Kitty O’Neil, CCE NNY Regional Field Crops and Soils Specialist with St. Lawrence, Franklin, Clinton and Essex counties.

‘The decline in the alfalfa stands is often blamed on winterkill, aggressive cutting or the alfalfa variety, when, in fact, it is alfalfa snout beetle. Growers may only notice that the stand is thinner each year,’ says Michael E. Hunter, a NNY Field Crop Specialist with Cornell Cooperative Extension in Jefferson and Lewis counties.

For assistance in evaluating fields for alfalfa snout beetle, Hunter can be reached at 315.788.8450, meh27@cornell.edu; O’Neil can be reached at 315.379.9192, kao32@cornell.edu.

NNYADP reports on alfalfa snout beetle research and other projects are found online at nnyagdev.org.

The Northern New York Agricultural Development Program is a farmer-driven research and technical assistance program for Clinton, Essex, Franklin, Jefferson, Lewis and St. Lawrence counties. Funding for the Northern New York Agricultural Development Program is supported by the New York State Senate and administered through the New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets.

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September 14, 2015
by Jennifer Thomas-Murphy
Comments Off on New Disease of Corn Found in Indiana: Tar Spot

New Disease of Corn Found in Indiana: Tar Spot

Photo: Purdue University Extension

Photo: Purdue University Extension

A corn disease new to the U.S. has been found in Indiana.  The disease is known as tar spot which is a good descriptor of the small black fungal bodies found on the surface of infected corn leaves.  Please see the full article from Purdue University for more detailed information including multiple, excellent photographs.  We are encouraging all to be vigilant for symptoms that that look like tar spot in New York corn (field, sweet, popcorn) fields over the next few weeks.  It will be essential to follow this up with laboratory diagnosis and official identification by USDA fungus experts.  Please contact Gary Bergstrom (gcb3@cornell.edu), Jaime Cummings (jc2246@cornell.edu), or Karen Snover-Clift (kls13@cornell.edu) if you find suspicious symptoms and to arrange for sending a sample to Cornell for diagnosis.  There will not be a charge for this diagnosis.

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August 5, 2015
by Jennifer Thomas-Murphy
Comments Off on NY Farms to Host Healthy Soils for Dairy Grazers Workshops August 24, 25, 26

NY Farms to Host Healthy Soils for Dairy Grazers Workshops August 24, 25, 26

NYSoilHealthTrailer3005Cortland, NY. The New York Grazing Coalition, Organic Valley Cooperative, and Cornell Cooperative Extension are hosting three free on-farm healthy soils workshops for dairy operators who graze their cows. The workshops in Groton, Lisbon and Little Falls, NY, will feature hand-on learning opportunities with the National Grazinglands Coalition Soil Health Trailer and soil health presenters.

The National Grazinglands Coalition Soil Health Trailer is equipped to measure and demonstrate vital physical, chemical, and biological components of soil health. Workshop participants will use penetrometers to measure soil compaction, and see a demonstration of the Active Carbon test that measures how much food the soil contains for the biological organisms that support soil health.

NY Organic Dairy Initiative Coordinator Fay Benson will compare soil management plots under a rainfall simulator to measure soil aggregate stability.
Benson says, ‘Soil health is being identified as the limiting factor to productivity on many farms nationwide. While seed companies and agronomists have done an excellent job of improving seed selection and the nutrient or chemical composition of soils to support crop production, we now realize the need to also focus on the physical structure and biological life in the soil to maximize the value of our fields and pastures.’

Livestock concentration, soil compaction and erosion, living plant cover, dead plant residue on the surface, forage mass and height and soil organic matter are some workable aspects of grazing land management. At each workshop, Organic Valley Cooperative Soil Agronomist Mark Kopecky will present farm management factors that contribute to overall soil health and consequently the growth and productivity of grazing lands. He will cover the soil traits that affect rainwater runoff and infiltration.

The workshops also include a short presentation on USDA Risk Management Agency policies to address the types of farm risks that are more difficult to manage.

The 10am to 2:30 pm workshops are free and include a light lunch. Registration is requested with Ellen Fagan, Cornell Cooperative Extension, 607-753-5078, etf22@cornell.edu, for the program of your choice:
August 24: Fay Benson’s Custom Grazing Farm, 546 Cobb Street, Groton NY
August 25: Bob Zufall’s No-Grain Dairy, 21 Campbell Road, Lisbon NY
August 26: Dan Casler’s Organic Dairy, 909 Paradise Road, Little Falls NY.

The National Grazinglands Coalition Soil Health Trailer is available to New York through a five-state Conservation Innovation Grant funded by the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service.

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July 21, 2015
by Jennifer Thomas-Murphy
Comments Off on New Soil Health Seminar Center at 2015 Empire Farm Days

New Soil Health Seminar Center at 2015 Empire Farm Days

USDA NRCS Plant Materials Specialist Paul Salon spearheaded development of the new Soil Health Seminar Center for the August 11-13, 2015 Empire Farm Days in Seneca Falls, NY. The Center will feature two speakers and a farmer panel each day plus cover plot demonstrations, a rainfall simulator, interseeder, and more.

USDA NRCS Plant Materials Specialist Paul Salon spearheaded development of the new Soil Health Seminar Center for the August 11-13, 2015 Empire Farm Days in Seneca Falls, NY. The Center will feature two speakers and a farmer panel each day plus cover plot demonstrations, a rainfall simulator, interseeder, and more.

Seneca Falls, NY.   The New York State Interagency Working Group for Soil Health will host two speakers and a panel of farmers daily starting at 9:30am at the new Soil Health Seminar Center at Lot 922 at Empire Farm Days, August 11-13, 2015, at Rodman Lott and Son Farms in Seneca Falls, NY. The trio of 45-minute sessions will cover a variety of soil health practices including cover cropping, reduced tillage, and nutrient management.

The schedule of Soil Health Center programs at Empire Farm Days is:

Tuesday, August 11
9:30    Cover Crop Mixes: Selection, Adaptation and Value with Dave Wilson of King’s AgriSeeds

10:30  Cover Crops, Worms and Soil Health with Dr. William F. Brinton, founder and president of Woods End Soil Laboratory, Mt. Vernon, Maine

11:30  Soil Health and Cover Crop Planning and Implementation Farmer Panel

12:15  Soil Health Center Luncheon sponsored by King’s AgriSeeds

Wednesday, August 12
9:30  Practical Implementation and Adaptation of Cover Crops and Reduced Tillage with Adam Robertson, Seedway

10:30  Soil Management Practices and Soil Health: Tillage Effects on Conventional and Organic Farming with Dr. William F. Brinton, founder and president of Woods End Soil Laboratory, Mt. Vernon, Maine

11:30 Soil Health and Reduced Tillage Farmer Panel

12:15 Soil Health Center Luncheon sponsored by King’s AgriSeeds

Thursday, August 13    
9:30  Fall and Spring Accumulation of N and C by Various Cover Crops with Karl Czymmek, Cornell University PRO-DAIRY, Cornell Nutrient Management Spear Program

10:30 Precision Nitrogen, Adapt-N and GreenSeeker® technology with Western New York Crop Management Association Manager Dave DeGolyer

11:30  Soil Health and Nutrient Management Farmer Panel

12:15 Soil Health Center Luncheon sponsored by King’s AgriSeeds

Field demonstrations associated with the Soil Health Seminar Center include cover crop plots established by Seedway and King’s AgriSeeds.

In addition, the USDA NRCS Big Flats Plant Materials Center in cooperation with Rodman Lott and Son Farms will have an innovative companion seeding of Dutch white clover and dwarf perennial ryegrass in soybeans using herbicides to stunt the cover crops until canopy closure.

A rainfall simulator and the Penn State University-designed interseeder are part of the new Center exhibits. Cornell Soil Health Program personnel will be at the Center to answer questions about soil health testing and management.

‘This new Soil Health Center at Empire Farm Days will be a great new resource for farmers interested in how they can improve their soil to enhance crop production, water quality, and resilience to extreme weather events,’ says USDA NRCS Plant Materials Specialist Paul Salon.

‘The new Soil Health Center is one more way Empire Farm Days can offer the latest information, equipment and techniques all in one location to help farmers and agribusinesses not be left behind by the fast-changing agricultural environment,’ says Empire Farm Days Manager Melanie Wickham.

Empire Farm Days is a 300-acre event with educational seminars, field demonstrations, agricultural and outdoors information and vendor booths, equipment displays, live animals, and rural life exhibits. Parking is $10 per vehicle. Learn more at empirefarmdays.com.

CONTACTS:
. Paul Salon, USDA NRCS, 607-562-8404 x103, paul.salon@ny.usda.gov
. Empire Farm Days Manager Melanie Wickham, 877-697-7837, mwickham@empirefarmdays.com
. EFD Publicist Kara Lynn Dunn, 315-465-7578, karalynn@gisco.net

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July 17, 2015
by Jennifer Thomas-Murphy
Comments Off on Keeping Cows and Crops Healthy Earns “Excellence in IPM” Award

Keeping Cows and Crops Healthy Earns “Excellence in IPM” Award

Waldron IPM AwardGENEVA, NY. July 16, 2015: Keith Waldron, livestock and field crop specialist with the New York State Integrated Pest Management Program (NYS IPM), has earned the program’s “Excellence in IPM” award. The award honors Waldron for 30 years of service to farmers who collectively contribute more than $3 billion to New York’s economy. He received his award on July 16 at Cornell University’s Aurora Farm Field Day in Aurora, New York.

Field crops and livestock — teaching better ways to keep them healthy and productive — are Waldron’s stock in trade. And whether he’s working with growers, industry reps, or a farmer’s next-door neighbor, his dependability, responsiveness, and ready humor have earned him broad respect as an honest broker, according to Gary Bergstrom, professor of plant pathology at Cornell University.

As a sought-after speaker on a wide range of topics for a wide range of audiences, says Cornell University weed scientist Russell Hahn, “Keith covers not only IPM but occasionally pinch hits on entomology and plant pathology.”

One innovation: hands-on teaching materials for classes held in farmers’ fields — an approach that makes IPM principles so much easier to understand. In fact, one nominator recalls an aphid infestation found during class time, just in time to save his crop.

“Frankly, we are years overdue in recognizing Keith Waldron for his many important contributions,” says Bergstrom. Bergstrom cites a second Waldron innovation, striking in its simplicity: setting up a series of conference calls among extension educators and researchers statewide throughout each growing season.

“This has done more to build a sense of shared community among field crop personnel than anything I’ve observed over the past 20 years,” Bergstrom says.

Learn more about IPM at NYSIPM.cornell.edu.

###

Contact: Gary Bergstrom
gcb3@cornell.edu
606 255 7849
www.nysipm.cornell.edu/press_rel/waldron.asp

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June 23, 2015
by Jennifer Thomas-Murphy
Comments Off on Fusarium Head Blight Alert – June 22, 2015

Fusarium Head Blight Alert – June 22, 2015

From Gary Bergstrom – Extension Plant Pathologist – Cornell University

Winter cereal fields in New York should be assessed for incidence of Fusarium head blight symptoms at this time to get some idea of the potential for DON contamination in grain.  Incidence has been observed from zero to over ten percent in individual fields.  Many fields of spring malting barley emerged from the boot over the past week and were sprayed with triazole fungicides at full head emergence.  Other spring cereals have not yet emerged from the boot.   Predicted risk of FHB is currently high for spring cereals flowering over the next few days in many areas of New York. The triazole products Caramba and Prosaro are the most effective fungicides for suppression of FHB and deoxynivalenol (DON) toxin contamination when applied at  full head emergence in barley (anthers begin to appear on barley before heads emerge from the boot) or at at wheat flowering (emergence of anthers on heads).  There is an application window of approximately 6 days from the beginning of flowering in which reasonable FHB suppression can be expected.  Fungicide products containing strobilurins should not be applied to headed wheat or barley as they may result in increased levels of DON in grain. Triazole applications at flowering should provide adequate protection against early developing rust, powdery mildew, and fungal leaf blotches on flag leaves. Leaf rusts and other foliar diseases are now fairly widespread on wheat and barley in New York.   Check the Fusarium Risk Assessment Tool (http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu/) and your local weather forecast frequently.

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