Cornell Field Crops News

Timely Field Crops information for the New York Agricultural Community

August 22, 2016
by Cornell Field Crops
Comments Off on NYS IPM Weekly Field Crops Pest Report – August 19, 2016

NYS IPM Weekly Field Crops Pest Report – August 19, 2016

Volume 15  Number 16

Pasture Fly IPM/Rotational Grazing/Pasture Soil Health Meeting in Essex County

Date:               September 10, 2016

Time:               2:00 pm to 4:00 pm

Location:         Gillilland Farm,

444 Mountain View Drive,

Willsboro, NY

To register please email or call Anita Deming

Email: anitademing@cornell.edu

Phone: 518-962-4810 x409

 

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August 18, 2016
by Cornell Field Crops
Comments Off on Weather Outlook – August 18, 2016

Weather Outlook – August 18, 2016

From Jessica Spaccio, NOAA Northeast Regional Climate Center, Cornell University

Last week temperatures ranged from 4 to 10 degrees above normal. Precipitation ranged from 1/2 inch to over 4 inches. Base 50 growing degree-days ranged from 140 to 220.

GDD48_Mar1_Aug17 GDD48_May1_Aug17 GDD50_Mar1_Aug17 GDD50_May1_Aug17

Warming up again through Sat, then a cold front brings chance for rain on Sunday and cooler temperatures…

Today will be a slight chance for showers and thunderstorms with temperatures in the mid 70’s to mid 80’s. Overnight lows will be in the mid 50’s to mid 60’s.

Friday will be dry and warm with highs will be in the 80’s and increasing humidity. Lows will be in the mid 50’s to mid 60’s.

Saturday temperatures will be in the mid 80’s to near 90 and humid with a slight chance for afternoon showers. Overnight temperatures will be in the 60’s.

Sunday highs will be in the mid 80’s to near 90 again, an afternoon/evening cold front will bring a chance for showers and thunderstorms. Overnight temperatures will be in the 60’s.

Monday highs will be cooler, in the upper 60’s and 70’s with a few lingering showers. Lows will be in the 50’s.

Tuesday temperatures will be in the upper 60’s and 70’s.  Lows will be in the 50’s.

Wednesday temperatures will be in the 70’s. Lows will be in the 50’s.

The five-day precipitation amounts will range from ¾” to 1.5”.

The 8-14 day outlook (August 25-31) shows increased chances for above normal temperatures for all of the state. There is no indication for precipitation.

The September outlook shows no indication for above or below normal temperatures or precipitation.

The September/October/November outlook show increased chances for above normal temperatures. There is no indication for precipitation.

The Drought Monitor: Enough rain (more than 2 inches) fell for a one-category improvement in extreme southwestern and south-central New York. However, some portions missed out on the heavy rains (e.g. western New York) where less than 0.5 inches fell. Accordingly, conditions deteriorated there, two new D3 areas (Extreme Drought) in western New York, one along the I-90 corridor, and another in the southern Finger Lakes region.

Maps of 8-14 day outlooks:
http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/predictions/814day/index.php

National Weather Service watch/warnings map:
http://www.weather.gov/erh/

US Drought Monitor:
http://droughtmonitor.unl.edu/Home.aspx

CLIMOD2 (NRCC data interface):
http://climodtest.nrcc.cornell.edu

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August 16, 2016
by Cornell Field Crops
Comments Off on Late Summer-Planted Forage Option for NNY: Farmer-Driven Program Posts Early Evaluation Results

Late Summer-Planted Forage Option for NNY: Farmer-Driven Program Posts Early Evaluation Results

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This photo shows the Northern New York Agricultural Development Program-funded oat forage trial at Canton, NY, on September 16, 2015, 43 days after planting. The forage variety plots were heavily impact by crown rust while the grain variety oat plots are less visibly diseased. Photo: K. O’Neil.

Northern New York. Hot, dry summer conditions can lead to insufficient hay and pasture forage for dairy farms. Could late summer planted oats be an option to fill that forage gap? A farmer-driven Northern New York Agricultural Development Program has posted results of recent field trials as field crop specialists prepare to plant a new trial at three NNY farm sites.

Drought conditions early in the 2015 growing season and a fungus impacted the summer oat trials planted in 2015 at the St. Lawrence County Extension Learning Farm in Canton, W.H. Miner Agricultural Research Institute in Chazy, and at a farm near Alexandria Bay, NY.

Research plots planted in 2013 and 2014 at the privately-owned farm near Alexandria Bay served as a preliminary indicator suggesting that late summer-planted oats are capable of producing high quality, high yielding forage.

Lack of soil moisture caused the plots at Alexandria Bay to fail completely in 2015. Forage quality of the crop harvested at the other locations was very good, but the lack of rain caused very poor yields. Crown rust, a common fungal disease of wild and cultivated oats, damaged plantings at all three farms in the study last year.

The research project funded by the farmer-led Northern New York Agricultural Development Program continues in 2016 with crown rust-resistant varieties. The research team led by Kitty O’Neil and Mike Hunter, field crops specialists with the Cornell University Cooperative Extension NNY Regional Ag Team, expects results form the 2016 to give a clearer indication of the potential of summer oats to provide Northern New York farmers with an emergency annual forage crop option.

Data including a summary of weather conditions during the 2015 growing season, trial plot forage yields, the incidence of crown rust infections, and a summary of nutritional quality is posted in the 2015 project report in the Field Crops Research: Oats section of the Northern New York Agricultural Development Program website at www.nnyagdev.org.

The farmer-driven Northern New York Agricultural Development Program provides grants for on-farm research and technical assistance projects in Clinton, Essex, Franklin, Jefferson, Lewis and St. Lawrence counties. Funding for the Northern New York Agricultural Development Program is supported by the New York State Senate and administered through the New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets.

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August 11, 2016
by Cornell Field Crops
Comments Off on Early August Update: 2016 Cornell NYS Commercial Corn Silage Trials

Early August Update: 2016 Cornell NYS Commercial Corn Silage Trials

Corn Silage Plot Early Aug 2016

Corn Silage Plots 2016 - Madrid mid-Aug update

Hybrid entries from various seed companies evaluated for forage yield and quality.  Results will be published in the fall to help growers make buying decisions for corn silage hybrids. Early and late June photos below:

Corn Silage Plots 2016 - June update Corn Silage Plots 2016

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August 11, 2016
by Cornell Field Crops
Comments Off on Weather Outlook – August 11, 2016

Weather Outlook – August 11, 2016

From Jessica Spaccio, NOAA Northeast Regional Climate Center, Cornell University

Last week temperatures ranged from near normal to 6 degrees above normal. Precipitation ranged from less than a quarter inch to over 2. Base 50 growing degree-days ranged from 100 to 180.

GDD48_Mar1_Aug10 GDD48_Mau1_Aug10 GDD50_Mar1_Aug10 GDD50_May1_Aug10

Rain! Showers and thunderstorms through early next week… flash flooding possible!

Today will be warm and muggy with temperatures in the mid 80’s to low 90’s. There will be scattered showers and thunderstorms with locally heavy rainfall. Overnight lows will be in the mid 60’s to low 70’s with scattered showers.

Friday highs will be in the mid 80’s to low 90’s and humid with scattered showers and thunderstorms; localized heavy rain and flash flooding potential. Lows will be in the mid 60’s to low 70’s.

Saturday there will be more widespread showers and thunderstorms with the potential for localized heavy rain and flash flooding. Temperatures will be in the upper 70’s and 80’s, humid conditions continue. Overnight temperatures will be in the mid 60’s to low 70’s.

Sunday showers and thunderstorms continue with highs in the mid 70’s to mid 80’s. Overnight temperatures will be in the 60’s.

Monday highs will be in the mid 70’s to mid 80’s. Lows will be in the 60’s.

Tuesday things dry out and temperatures will be in the mid 70’s to mid 80’s.  Lows will be in the 60’s.

Wednesday temperatures will be in the 80’s. Lows will be in the upper 50’s to mid 60’s.

The five-day precipitation amounts will range from 1 ¼” to 3” .

The 8-14 day outlook (August 18-24) shows increased chances for above normal temperatures for all of the state. There is an increased chance for above normal precipitation for southwest NY.

The Drought Monitor: Areas of abnormally dry conditions, moderate & severe drought expand.

Maps of 8-14 day outlooks:
http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/predictions/814day/index.php

National Weather Service watch/warnings map:
http://www.weather.gov/erh/

US Drought Monitor:
http://droughtmonitor.unl.edu/Home.aspx

CLIMOD2 (NRCC data interface):
http://climodtest.nrcc.cornell.edu

 

 

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August 4, 2016
by Cornell Field Crops
Comments Off on Weather Outlook – August 4, 2016

Weather Outlook – August 4, 2016

From Jessica Spaccio, NOAA Northeast Regional Climate Center, Cornell University

Last week temperatures ranged from near normal to 4 degrees above normal for most of the state. Precipitation ranged from less than a quarter inch in western and northern NY to over 3 inches in eastern areaws. Base 50 growing degree-days ranged from 110 to 170.

GDD48_Mar1_Aug3 GDD48_May1_Aug3 GDD50_Mar1_Aug3 GDD50_May1_Aug3

Showers and thunderstorms Friday into Saturday, then cooler and dry…

Today will be sunny and humid with temperatures in the upper 70’s to near 90. Overnight lows will be in the upper 50’s to mid 60’s.

Friday will be warm again with highs in the 80’s to near 90. Lows will be in the 60’s with showers and thunderstorms beginning in the afternoon in western NY as a cold front approaches, heavy rainfall is possible in western NY.

Saturday scattered showers and thunderstorms are possible as the front moves east and out of the state with temperatures in the upper 70’s to mid 80’s. Overnight temperatures will be in the mid 50’s to mid 60’s.

Sunday will be cooler and sunny with highs in the mid 70’s to low 80’s. Overnight temperatures will be in the 50’s.

Monday highs will be in the mid 70’s to lower 80’s. Lows will be in the 50’s.

Tuesday temperatures will be in the mid 70’s to mid 80’s.  Lows will be in the 50’s.

Wednesday there is a slight chance of showers and thunderstorms, temperatures will be in the low to mid 80’s. Lows will be in the 60’s.

The five-day precipitation amounts will range from 1/10 ” to 3/4” .

The 8-14 day outlook (August 11-17) shows increased chances for above normal temperatures for all of the state. There is an increased chance for above normal precipitation for all but extreme southern and southeast NY.

The Drought Monitor: Only slight changes to this week’s map.

Maps of 8-14 day outlooks:
http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/predictions/814day/index.php

National Weather Service watch/warnings map:
http://www.weather.gov/erh/

US Drought Monitor:
http://droughtmonitor.unl.edu/Home.aspx

CLIMOD2 (NRCC data interface):
http://climodtest.nrcc.cornell.edu

 

 

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August 2, 2016
by Cornell Field Crops
Comments Off on Help locate Johnsongrass populations in New York State

Help locate Johnsongrass populations in New York State

Professor Toni DiTommaso is working on a nation-wide research project assessing the distribution and genetic diversity of the invasive perennial weed, Johnsongrass (Sorghum halepense). Currently, NY State is at the geographic northern-most limit of its range, but it is expected to increase in abundance in the state over the coming decades. He has included a brief description and several images of this species below to help with identification in case you are not familiar with it.

He is reaching out to you to help him locate Johnsongrass populations in NY State as he would like to collect seeds from these plants later this month and into early fall. These seeds along with seeds collected in other regions of the country will be grown in “common gardens” at locations across the country including here in central NY. This research will give us a good idea of how well adapted different populations of this invasive species are to growing in various regions of the country and in which regions it may become especially troublesome to manage.

If you know of Johnsongrass populations in NY State that have not yet been killed by herbicides or mowed (he needs to collect seeds), please e-mail Toni (ad97@cornell.edu) the precise location of the population (GPS coordinates, road intersections, etc.), the type of habitat it is found in (e.g. corn field, roadside, back of barn), and the approximate size of the population(s) (e.g. 10 ft x 15 ft). If you would like to take a few pictures of the plants and e-mail them to Toni, he could try to confirm that it is indeed Johnsongrass.

When this research is completed in a few years, he hopes to present his findings at various agricultural extension venues in the State.

Thank you for your help and he looks forward to hearing from you.

Toni DiTommaso (ad97@cornell.edu)
Weed Ecology & Management Lab
Soil and Crop Sciences
903 Bradfield Hall
Cornell University

BRIEF DESCRIPTION: Johnsongrass is a tall, coarse, grass with stout rhizomes. It grows in dense clumps or nearly solid stands and can reach 8 feet (2.4 meters) in height. Leaves are smooth, 6-20 inches (15.2-50.8 cm) long, and have a white midvein. Stems are pink to rusty red near the base. Panicles are large, loosely branched, purplish, and hairy. Spikelets occur in pairs or threes and each has a conspicuous awn. Seeds are reddish-brown and nearly 1/8 inch (0.3 cm) long.

Johnsongrass plants in flower

Mature Johnsongrass plants in flower

Johnsongrass seedheads 1

Seedheads

Johnsongrass seedheads 2

Seedheads

 

 

 

 

 

Note the prominent, white, midvein on a mature Johnsongrass leaf (LEFT) and root system with rhizomes (RIGHT)

Note the prominent, white, midvein on a mature Johnsongrass leaf (LEFT) and root system with rhizomes (RIGHT)

 

The ligules on Johnsongrass leaves (A) are membranous, while the ligules on Fall Panicum leaves (B) are a fringe of hairs. Barnyardgrass (C) lacks ligules.

The ligules on Johnsongrass leaves (A) are membranous, while the ligules on Fall Panicum leaves (B) are a fringe of hairs. Barnyardgrass (C) lacks ligules.

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