Cornell Field Crops News

Timely Field Crops information for the New York Agricultural Community

September 22, 2014
by Jennifer Thomas-Murphy
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To make it easier to find posts, events, or stories specific to a region or county, each regional/county post will be tagged so that you may select just that region/county under the categories list (beginning with posts from August 1st, 2014 or later).

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February 25, 2015
by Jennifer Thomas-Murphy
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Researchers, Coordinators, and Farmers:

An online survey has been created to learn about cover cropping practices and preferences of farmers. The survey is multiple-choice and should take between 5 and 10 minutes to complete. This is an excellent opportunity to hear directly from farmers about their needs and desires for improving cover crops.

If you have connections with networks of farmers (within New York State or elsewhere), we ask that you distribute the below survey link. If you are a farmer yourself, we enthusiastically invite you to take our survey.

https://cornell.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_6qWpsn7f9BZsyjj

Thank you for your time,

Sandra Wayman
Matt Ryan
Cornell University Sustainable Cropping Systems Lab

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February 20, 2015
by Jennifer Thomas-Murphy
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The Capital Area Ag Report for February 2015 is now available online. Inside this Issue:

  • Announcements
  • Soil Health Recap
  • Grain School Recap
  • Forage Sampling
  • Frost Bite in Livestock
  • Frost Seeding
  • Cover Crop Tables

Click here for the issue in PDF format.

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February 11, 2015
by Jennifer Thomas-Murphy
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NYCSGA Request for 2015 Corn Research Proposals – Due Feb. 28th

NThe New York Corn & Soybean Growers Association is requesting proposals for 2015 corn research and education. Proposals must be received no later than 4 pm on February 28, 2015 at:

NYCSGA
PO Box 605
Sackets Harbor, NY 13685 or
Email: Julia@nycornsoy.com

Emailed proposals formatted as a PDF are encouraged and should be sent to Julia Robbins, Julia@nycornsoy.com.

Funding decisions are expected to be made on or around March 30, 2015. Typical awards are expected to be $10,000 per project or less. NYCGSA reserves the right to negotiate award/contract funding with successful applicants.

The available funds for 2015 research and education projects will be awarded with funds from New York state. There is a limited amount of funding available, so this process will be competitive. In addition, funds will be awarded on a reimbursement basis. Grantees should be prepared for a lag time in receiving reimbursement, as the funding must first come from the state.

Eligible researchers/ investigators may include scientists from colleges and universities or agri-businesses, cooperative extension agents, independent consultants and farmers. Collaboration between academic institutions, businesses and farmers is encouraged.

Please use the following format for your proposal:

1.   Project title

2.   Investigator(s) name, contact information, and affiliation (contact information should include, phone, address, email).

3.   Specific research or education objectives

4.   Brief discussion of the expected benefits of the research or education to soybean producers.

5.   Identify the goal(s) of the project, and list the “key performance indicators” that will be used to measure the success of the project. *

6.   Concise description of the experimental or educational approach with procedures to be used, and explanation of how the proposed research or education relates to any past research or showing that no previous research has been done (reference key research publications as appropriate).

7.   Detailed line-item budget including any other sources (current or pending) of funding for this same research. Attach supporting data for any proposed expenditures in excess of $10,000. Principal investigator or educator salary and non-expendable equipment are not eligible for funding. NYCSGA will not pay overhead and direct costs.

8.   Brief description of investigator or educator qualifications for the proposed research.

9.   Signature of authorized representative & date.

*A set of quantifiable measures used to gauge or compare performance in terms of meeting strategic and operational goals.

Note: If on farm field trials or other farmer engagement is part of the research proposal, then please include letters of collaboration from participating farmers.

While NYCSGA will consider multi-year proposals, funding awards/ contracts will only be made for one year at a time given that the Board’s source of funds depends on renewed funding from the state. This also allows the Board to consider the effectiveness of any previous research or education expenditures on the proposed or similar research projects and of the researcher on this or other projects.

The following is a summary of New York’s highest priority corn-related research needs. We encourage you to consider this list as guidance when submitting your proposals. All proposals must clearly show the benefits for corn farmers.

2015 New York State Corn Research & Education Priorities:

  • Plant population/nitrogen rate interaction
  • Pop-up and 2×2 effects on test weight/yield/forage quality
  • Adapt-N model with variable rate
  • Late season fungicide application with corn silage
  • Population in corn silage
  • Stabilized vs Unstabilized Anhydrous and Rates
  • Stabilized vs Un-stabilized Anhydrous Ammonia Placement Trial
  • Planting depth

*These are NYCSGA’s top priorities in 2015. NYCSGA has developed descriptions for these projects. Researchers interested in pursuing these projects should consult the project description developed by and available through NYCSGA and submit a proposal in full, as described on page 1.

Remember – this is not an exclusive list. If you have an idea for a project that is not listed here but has the potential to benefit New York corn farmers, you are invited to enter a full proposal.

New in 2015: Applicants will be required to present their proposal for funding to the NYCSGA Research Committee on March 25 at Monroe Tractor in Henrietta, NY. Applicants should prepare a 10-15 minute presentation. More information TBD.

NYCSGA will require that researchers or educators who are successful in receiving NYCSGA funding for their work will acknowledge NYCSGA support in any publication reporting findings of the NYCSGA sponsored research. Projects awarded funding by NYCSGA must demonstrate a direct benefit to corn farmers. In addition, NYCSGA requires electronic copies of the final research reports, any publications of the findings, and a research abstract, all of which NYCSGA may use in describing the project and its findings in any NYCSGA publication or the website.

For more information, please call Julia Robbins, NYCSGA Executive Director at 315-583-5296, email Julia@nycornsoy.com.

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February 11, 2015
by Jennifer Thomas-Murphy
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NYCSGA Request for 2015 Soybean Research Proposals – Due Feb. 20th

NThe New York Corn & Soybean Growers Association is requesting proposals for 2015 soybean research and education. Proposals must be received no later than 4 pm on February 20, 2015 at:
NYCSGA
PO Box 605
Sackets Harbor, NY 13685 or
Email: Julia@nycornsoy.com

Emailed proposals formatted as a PDF are encouraged and should be sent to Julia Robbins, Julia@nycornsoy.com.

Funding decisions are expected to be made on or around March 30, 2015. Typical awards are expected to be $10,000 per project or less. NYCGSA reserves the right to negotiate award/contract funding with successful applicants.

The available funds for 2015 research and education projects will be awarded with funds collected from NYCSGA’s Soybean checkoff assessments, and will be based on actual and anticipated collection of checkoff assessments received in New York State.

Eligible researchers/ investigators may include scientists from colleges and universities or agri-businesses, cooperative extension agents, independent consultants and farmers. Collaboration between academic institutions, businesses and farmers is encouraged.

Please use the following format for your proposal:

1.   Project title
2.   Investigator(s) name, contact information, and affiliation (contact information should include, phone, address, email).
3.   Specific research or education objectives
4.   Brief discussion of the expected benefits of the research or education to soybean producers.
5.   Identify the goal(s) of the project, and list the “key performance indicators” that will be used to measure the success of the project. *
6.   Concise description of the experimental  or educational approach with procedures to be used, and explanation of how the proposed research or education relates to any past research or showing that no previous research has been done (reference key research publications as appropriate).
7.   Detailed line-item budget including any other sources (current or pending) of funding for this same research. Attach supporting data for any proposed expenditures in excess of $10,000. Principal investigator or educator salary and non-expendable equipment are not eligible for funding. NYCSGA will not pay overhead and direct costs.
8.   Brief description of investigator or educator qualifications for the proposed research.
9.   Signature of authorized representative & date.

*A set of quantifiable measures used to gauge or compare performance in terms of meeting strategic and operational goals.

Note: If on farm field trials or other farmer engagement is part of the research proposal, then please include letters of collaboration from participating farmers.

While NYCSGA will consider multi-year proposals, funding awards/ contracts will only be made for one year at a time given that the Board’s source of funds varies by annual soybean sales and checkoff assessment collections. This also allows the Board to consider the effectiveness of any previous research or education expenditures on the proposed or similar research projects and of the researcher on this or other projects. Payments of research grant awards will be made as follows: 40 % when project is approved and contract is returned to NYCSGA, 40% upon submission of progress report, and 10% upon submission of final report.

The following is a summary of New York’s highest priority soybean-related research needs. We encourage you to consider this list as guidance when submitting your proposals. All proposals must clearly show the benefits for soybean farmers.

2015 New York State Soybean Research & Education Priorities:
*Soybean Seed Treatments
*Soybean Nitrogen applications
*Pop-up fertilizers in low fertility soils
White mold management
Consumer education about modern agriculture practices
Integrated pest management in soybeans
Feeding quality for livestock – whole cooked vs. meal – nutritional value
International and domestic trade marketing
Biodiesel
Feasibility or development of in-state soybean processing

*These are NYCSGA’s top priorities in 2015. NYCSGA has developed descriptions for these projects. Researchers interested in pursuing these projects should consult the project description developed by and available through NYCSGA and submit a proposal in full, as described on page 1.

Remember – this is not an exclusive list. If you have an idea for a project that is not listed here but has the potential to benefit New York soybean farmers, you are invited to enter a full proposal.

New in 2015: Applicants will be required to present their proposal for funding to the NYCSGA Research Committee on March 25 in Pavilion, NY. Applicants should prepare a 10-15 minute presentation. More information TBD.
 
NYCSGA will require that researchers or educators who are successful in receiving NYCSGA funding for their work will acknowledge NYCSGA and soybean checkoff support in any publication reporting findings of the NYCSGA sponsored research. Projects awarded funding by the New York Soybean Checkoff must demonstrate a direct benefit to soybean farmers. In addition, NYCSGA requires electronic copies of the final research reports, any publications of the findings, and a research abstract, all of which NYCSGA may use in describing the project and its findings in any NYCSGA publication or the website.

For more information, please call Julia Robbins, NYCSGA Executive Director at 315-583-5296, email Julia@nycornsoy.com.

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February 10, 2015
by Jennifer Thomas-Murphy
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New York State Industrial Hemp Trials

There have been a number of inquiries about potential industrial hemp trials in NYS in 2015.  Here is my view of the current state of affairs (from Jerry Cherney):

  1. Industrial hemp is not marijuana. Hemp has very low THC content, the psychoactive component of marijuana. So unless you want to smoke a joint the size of a telephone pole, you can’t get a high from hemp.
  2. NYS passed a law allowing research trial sites for industrial hemp in NYS in 2015, becoming the 19th state legalizing either research and/or production industrial hemp trials. At this time, the NYS law does not take effect until mid-June, so nothing could be planted before then. It may be possible to amend the law.
  3. Agronomic guidelines are not obvious for NYS conditions. Seeding rates for hemp have varied from 10 to 125 lbs/acre, optimal seeding rates may be around 25 lbs/acre. Hemp should be planted after danger of a hard freeze, maybe a little later than corn, when soil temperatures reach 50 F. Like corn, it likes warm weather, well-drained soils, and good fertility. A 6-8” row spacing is typically used, ideally ending up with around 10 plants per square foot.
  4. There is also a range in maturity ratings, but varieties are available that may have as short a season as 110 to 120 days to grain maturity. Maturity ratings from other regions may not apply here. There are seed-type hemps, fiber-type hemps, and dual purpose hemps. Seed-type hemps are shorter (5-7’ tall), while fiber types may be 10-15’ tall, with dual purpose intermediate in height.
  5. Hemp clearly has problems with harvesting, tending to wrap up and plug combines, the taller the hemp the greater the issue. Some modifications have helped with this.
  6. There is a wide range of products that come from hemp fiber and seed. Right now there is an organized market for hemp seed, and less of an organized market for other hemp products.
  7. NYS Ag & Markets has formed a Hemp Work Group, and is currently working on a set of guidelines governing any hemp trials. It is difficult to make any plans for potential trials before guidelines are developed.
  8. At least two companies/organizations are interested in sponsoring hemp trials or providing varieties for testing. One of these groups is planning 2015 hemp trials in Vermont and Maine. Most likely a number of other states will conduct trials.
  9. Funding, the elephant in the room. The interested organizations would like to partner with Cornell and other institutions to conduct trials, but there may not be enough funds to actually conduct the trials, without partners contributing. Discussions with other groups over the past 4 years about potential hemp trials (even though illegal at that time), indicated that there was limited funding available for hemp trials from the industry.
  10. At this time there is no financial support for hemp trials from NYS or from Cornell. (It appears that the state of Kentucky and several other states are providing some sort of financial support for organized hemp variety trials). Hemp research trials were conducted in Kentucky, Colorado, and Vermont in 2014.
  11. Federal law still forbids planting of hemp for any reason, but there is legislation proposed to change this. It is not clear at this time what sort of regulations will be necessary for growing hemp in NYS. Last year Kentucky attempted and eventually got hemp trials planted considerably later than normal, because the seed was being held by DEA until they were politically forced to release the seed for some late May plantings. The problem with DEA has been resolved for 2015.

A mid-June or later planting date will be very problematic for getting a mature hemp crop in 2015. It may be possible to plant in late June and still get a mature crop, but it is unlikely. Kentucky was successful in getting a grain crop in 2014, after planting in late May, but their growing season is 2-3 weeks longer in the fall compared to ours.

Regardless of the products produced from hemp, agronomically it can be treated essentially as a grain crop, which could be successfully grown by NYS farmers with grain crop expertise. One of the better quotes I found is: “Probably more so than any plant in living memory, hemp attracts people to attempt its cultivation without first acquiring a realistic appreciation of the possible pitfalls. American presidents Washington and Jefferson encouraged the cultivation of hemp, but both lost money trying to grow it.” Hemp cultivation in Canada over the past 15 years has had mixed results, a large investment in hemp for fiber was not linked to the development of an organized market. Teenagers raided fields in the mistaken belief they were getting marijuana. Growing this crop in NYS will be benefited by informing local and statewide media of the facts about industrial hemp.

 

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January 15, 2015
by Jennifer Thomas-Murphy
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Cutting Edge Technologies on Agenda for February 2015 North Country Crop Congress in Chazy, Lowville

Chazy, NY; Lowville, NY   Use of unmanned aerial vehicles/UAV and normalized difference vegetation index/NDVI imaging systems are on the agenda of the 2015 North Country Crop Congresses: Tuesday, February 17, at W.H. Miner Agricultural Research Institute, Chazy, NY, and Wednesday, February 18, at Ridgeview Hotel, Lowville, NY.

Cornell Nutrient Management Spear Program Director Dr. Quirine Ketterings will share her experience and latest results from a project using NDVI sensors for on-the-go nitrogen application in corn.  She will also present findings from 2 years of her corn yield potential research studies.

Dr. Elson Shields, Professor of Entomology at Cornell University and a licensed pilot, will moderate a panel of North Country crop consultants and agribusiness leaders in a question-and-answer session about using UAV in crop production and how they may be used in Northern NY agriculture.

Dr. Shields will also discuss recent developments regarding corn insect traits and the importance of insect resistance management to preserve the effectiveness of these technologies. He will also present information about using entomopathogenic nematodes for the biological control of the alfalfa snout beetle.

The 10am-3pm Crop Congress educational program agenda includes Dr. Russ Hahn, a Cornell Crop and Soil Sciences professor, with  an update on current technologies under development for weed control in corn and soybeans as well as management of herbicide-resistant weeds for 2015.

NYSDEC and CCA credits for this program are pending approval. You must arrive on time and stay for the entire program to receive these credits.  Agribusiness vendors are invited to participate in a tradeshow at both locations.  Farm Service and Risk Management Agencies will provide brief program updates during the lunch break.

This year there is a registration fee at both the Chazy and Lowville Congresses.  Registration fees are $20 per person if pre-registered by February 11, or $25 at the door. Lunch and educational materials are included in each registration. Anyone who needs DEC credits to retain a pesticide certification license should pre-register to ensure proper certification forms are prepared.

To register for the Chazy location, call the Clinton County CCE office at 518-561-7450 or visit their website at http://blogs.cornell.edu/cceclintoncounty/ to register online.

To register for the Lowville location, call the Lewis County CCE office at 315-376-5270 or visit their website at http://blogs.cornell.edu/ccelewis/ to register online.

Paypal, cash or check registration payments will be accepted at both locations.  Credit card payments can also be accepted by Clinton County CCE.

The North Country Crop Congresses are sponsored by Cornell Cooperative Extension of Jefferson, Lewis, St. Lawrence, Franklin, Clinton and Essex counties as well as the W.H. Miner Institute.  If you have any special needs to attend either Crop Congress, please call the appropriate Cornell Cooperative Extension office to request accommodation.

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January 15, 2015
by Jennifer Thomas-Murphy
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North Country Farmers Invited to NNY Agricultural Development Program Annual Meetings January 30 and February 27

Press Release: January 14, 2015
Contacts: NNYADP Co-Chairs, Jon Greenwood, 315-323-4814; Joe Giroux, 518-563-7523; Program Coordinator Margaret Smith, Cornell University, 607-255-1654
Publicist Kara Lynn Dunn, 315-465-7578, karalynn@gisco.net
Link to release: http://www.nnyagdev.org/index.php/2015/01/14/farmers-invited-nnyadp-annual-meetings-130-227/

North Country Farmers Invited to NNY Agricultural Development Program Annual Meetings January 30 and February 27

The Northern New York Agricultural Development Program is inviting North Country farmers to hear the results of its latest projects as part of its annual meetings on Friday, January 30 in Watertown and February 27 in Chazy.

The research reports sessions begin at 1pm at the Ramada Inn in Watertown and at 1pm at Miner Institute in Chazy. Registration is not required to attend.

The Northern New York Agricultural Development Program is a farmer-driven research and technical assistance program serving all sectors of the agricultural industry, from dairy and crops to livestock, maple and horticultural production, in Clinton, Essex, Franklin, Jefferson, Lewis and St. Lawrence counties.

‘The Northern New York Agricultural Development Program is noted for producing real-world, practical results, and the 2014 project reports live up to that expectation,’ says Program Co-Chair Jon Greenwood, a dairy producer in St. Lawrence County.

‘Northern New York Agricultural Development Program small grants connect North Country farmers with faculty, researchers, and specialists with Cornell University, Cornell Cooperative Extension, the State University of New York, W.H. Miner Agricultural Research Institute, and other expertise to address critical needs and emerging opportunities,’ says NNYADP Co-Chair Joe Giroux, a Clinton County dairyman.

Reports at the meetings will cover:
.  emerging corn and soybean diseases
.  the identification of mastitis-causing pathogens
.  corn grain variety trials under Northern New York growing conditions
.  evaluating alfalfa-grass mixes for dairy and livestock forage
.  production practices for the Juneberry superfruit
. health management for sheep and goats, and
.  how the inexpensive biocontrol developed with long-term NNYADP funding to beat back the highly-destructive alfalfa snout beetle now holds promise for helping fruit and vegetable growers statewide.

One of the acclaimed Northern New York Agricultural Development Program successes came through long-term funding that provided the time needed for Cornell University researchers to develop an inexpensive, biocontrol treatment that is now substantially reducing the impact of the highly-destructive alfalfa snout beetle. The concept of using native nematodes that destroy the larvae of the beetle is now being applied in trials to reduce other types of pests in strawberry crops in Northern New York, in apple and grape crops elsewhere in the state, and at the Battle Island Golf Course in Fulton, NY.

As time allows, the meeting may also make note of recent NNYADP projects focused on winter forage crops production for the dairy and livestock industries; enhancing agricultural environmental stewardship through tile drainage, nutrient recycling, and on-farm water quality; adapting to climate change; enhancing market opportunities for North Country beef producers; and season extension for fruit and vegetable growers.

Complete research reports are posted on the Northern New York Agricultural Development Program website at www.nnyagdev.org. For more details on the annual meetings, call 315-376-5270.

According to the 2012 Census of Agriculture, 4,365 farms manage more than 1.1 million acres of farmland with a hired labor payroll of more than $67.2 million. Those numbers represent a gain of 97 farms, 64,487 acres, and $15 million in payroll since the 2007 Census.

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November 14, 2014
by Jennifer Thomas-Murphy
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Field Crop Dealer Meeting Recap

Over 65 growers, dealers, and CCE field crop educators attended the 2014 Field Crop Dealer Meeting held at the Holiday Inn Liverpool on November 12th.   The group learned about the latest research and trial data including herbicide resistant superweeds and facts and myths about GMOs with a highlight of Russ Hahn being presented with the 2014 Industry Impact Award by the New York State Agribusiness Association.  The full agenda included:

  • Western Bean Cutworm in NY: Update on Status and Implications of a new corn and dry bean pest – Keith Waldron
  • New Developments in Field Crop Disease Detection and Management – Gary Bergstrom
  • Alfalfa Fields Revisited; Soil pH, sulfur and cation exchange capacity- Quirine Ketterings
  • Neonics in groundwater, bee decline and BT-CRW resistance: The double whammy for corn production – Elson Shields
  • What’s the Status of Technologies Being Developed for Herbicide Resistance Management? - Russ Hahn
  • Who put those genes in my food?? Facts and myths about genetically engineered crops – Margaret Smith

The abstract booklet for the meeting is available as PDF, and videos from each presentation will be available in the next couple of weeks on the Cornell Field Crops Vimeo page.

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October 24, 2014
by Jennifer Thomas-Murphy
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NY Corn and Soybean Growers Association Seeking Future Leaders to Attend the ASA Leadership College

The New York Soybean Checkoff is sponsoring two New York soybean growers to attend the Annual American Soybean Association Leadership College. Please contact Julia Robbins by Dec. 1 if you are interested in participating. The NY Soybean Checkoff will pay for travel costs. Julia: 315-583-5296, juliacrobbins@gmail.com. If more than two people are interested in representing New York, the NYCSGA board will choose two growers to attend.

For more information about the 2015 Soybean Leadership College click here http://soygrowers.com/learn/soybean-leadership-college/.

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