Weather Outlook – September 17, 2020

Contributed by NOAA Northeast Regional Climate Center, Cornell University

Last week temperatures ranged from near normal to 6 degrees below normal. Precipitation has ranged from a hundredth of an inch to 2 inches in isolated areas. Base 50 growing degree-days ranged from 10-110.

GDD Base 48 Mar 1 - Sept 16GDD Base 48 May 1 - Sept 16 GDD Base 50 Mar 1 - Sept 16 GDD Base 50 May 1 - Sept 16Today temperatures be in the 60s to mid 70s with scattered light rain showers. Overnight lows will be in the 30s to mid 40s; patchy frost possible in the North Country.

Friday temperatures will be in the mid 50s to 60s with breezy conditions and some light showers in eastern areas but dry in most places. Overnight temperatures will be in the mid 30s to low 40s with frost possible.

Saturday temperatures will be in the upper 50s to mid 60s with breezy conditions. Overnight temperatures will be in the 30s with potential for frost.

Sunday highs will be in the upper 50s to mid 60s. Overnight temperatures will be in the 30s to around 40 with frost possible.

Monday temperatures will be in the mid 60s to around 70. Overnight temperatures will be in the mid 30s to mid 40s.

Tuesday highs will be in the upper 60s to low 70s. Overnight temperatures will be in the 40s.

Wednesday highs will be in the 70s. Overnight temperatures will be in the 40s.

The seven-day precipitation amounts will range from 0.00” to over 0.25” inches.

The 8-14 day outlook (September 24-30) favors above-normal temperatures and below-normal precipitation.

Maps of 8-14 day outlooks:
http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/predictions/814day/index.php

National Weather Service watch/warnings map:
http://www.weather.gov/erh/

US Drought Monitor
http://droughtmonitor.unl.edu/

CLIMOD2 (NRCC data interface):
http://climod2.nrcc.cornell.edu

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Weather Outlook – September 10, 2020

Contributed by NOAA Northeast Regional Climate Center, Cornell University

Last week temperatures ranged from near normal to 4 degrees above normal. Precipitation has ranged from a hundredth of an inch to 2 inches in isolated areas. Base 50 growing degree-days ranged from 50-150.

GDD Base 48 Mar 1 - Sept 29 GDD Base 48 May 1 - Sept 9 GDD Base 50 Mar 1 - Sept 9 GDD Base 50 May 1 - Sept 9

Today temperatures be in the low 70s to 80s. Showers and thunderstorms are possible mostly in eastern areas from a passing cold front; locally heavy rainfall possible. Overnight lows will be in the mid 40s to 50s.

Friday temperatures will be in the mid 60s to mid 70s with sunny skies. Overnight temperatures will be in the low 40s to low 50s, some 30s possible.

Saturday temperatures will be in the 70s. Overnight temperatures will be in the mid to upper 50s with showers and thunderstorms.

Sunday highs will be in the mid 60s to low 80s with widespread rain and some thunderstorms from an approaching cold front. Overnight temperatures will be in the 50s.

Monday temperatures will be in the upper 60s to upper 70s. Overnight temperatures will be in the 40s, some 30s possible.

Tuesday highs will be in the mid 60s to upper 70s. Overnight temperatures will be in the upper 30s to 40s.

Wednesday highs will be in the mid 60s to upper 70s. Overnight temperatures will be in the 40s.

The seven-day precipitation amounts will range from 0.10” to over 2.50” inches, with the highest amounts expected in southeast NY.

The 8-14 day outlook (September 17-23) favors near- to above-normal temperatures and favors above-normal precipitation.

Maps of 8-14 day outlooks:
http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/predictions/814day/index.php

National Weather Service watch/warnings map:
http://www.weather.gov/erh/

US Drought Monitor:
http://droughtmonitor.unl.edu/

CLIMOD2 (NRCC data interface):
http://climod2.nrcc.cornell.edu

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NY Corn Dry Down Observations – 9/3/2020

Contributed by Joe Lawrence – Dairy Forage Systems Specialist with Cornell CALS PRO-DAIRY

I have been talking about how this season is reminiscent of 2018 for many areas of the state. Visually, we saw a very green healthy crop, but ears dried down fast and caught people off guard.  And, the same scenario seems to be in play this year given a number of reports I have seen as well as what’s been observed at some of our research plots.

I have also taken note of how some fields which received some drought ending rain after tasseling reminded me more of 2016 when we saw slower than normal dry down because the crop seemed to try to make up for lost ground during ear fill.

After a visit to our plot in Madrid, NY, the plot appears to look pretty good despite very low rainfall this year, which is acceptable given the circumstances. Of course, it’s not going to set any yield records but is decent corn with a good ear.

Today, the plot will hit 800 GDD’s since tasseling.  Based on previous research from Bill Cox, that would suggest it should be getting close to 32% DM. We know there is some variability in this number, but it has been pretty close with some of our other locations this year.

I took 2 samples when I visited Madrid  to check whole plant DM.

    • 97 day – 28% DM
    • 100 day – 25% DM

These numbers fall well below where we would expect given the tasseling date and GDD accumulation.  And as such, this location certainly seems to be lining up with what we observed in 2016.

For more on this topic, check out the 1st Episode, Corn Silage 2020 Season Recap, of the Cornell PRO-DAIRY Corn Silage Harvest Considerations Podcast Series.

 

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Weather Outlook – September 3, 2020

Contributed by NOAA Northeast Regional Climate Center, Cornell University

Last week temperatures ranged from 6 degrees below normal to 4 degrees above normal. Precipitation has ranged from less than a quarter of an inch to an isolated area of over 3 inches in isolated areas. Base 50 growing degree-days ranged from 40-140.

GDD Base 48 Mar 1 - Sept 2 GDD Base 48 May 1 - Sept 2 GDD Base 50 Mar 1 - Sept 2 GDD Base 50 May 1 - Sept 2

Today temperatures will warm into the mid 70s to mid 80s with a slight chance for afternoon showers and thunderstorms. Overnight lows will be in the mid 50s to mid 60s.

Friday temperatures will be in the upper 60s to upper 70s with high pressure bringing fair weather to most areas, northern NY could see some light rain; there will be gusty conditions in the afternoon. Overnight temperatures will be in the mid 40s to mid 50s with showers possible east of Lake Ontario.

Saturday temperatures will be in the upper 60s to upper 70s with sunny skies for along the southern border and increasing clouds northward with a few light rain shows possible in northern NY. Overnight temperatures will be in the mid 40s to mid 50s.

Sunday highs will be in the mid to upper 70s. Overnight temperatures will be in the 50s to low 60s with a slight chance of showers.

Monday temperatures will be in the 70s with showers possible. Overnight temperatures will be in the 50s to low 60s.

Tuesday highs will be in the upper 70s to mid 80s with humid conditions. Overnight temperatures will be in the 50s to low 60s.

Wednesday highs will be in the upper 70s to mid 80s. Heavy rain and thunderstorms are possible; there is a lot of uncertainty of when and if this will happen. Overnight temperatures will be in the 50s to low 60s.

The seven-day precipitation amounts will range from 0” to over 0.25” inches.

The 8-14 day outlook (September 10-16) favors near- to above-normal temperatures and favors above-normal precipitation.

Maps of 8-14 day outlooks:
http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/predictions/814day/index.php

National Weather Service watch/warnings map:
http://www.weather.gov/erh/

US Drought Monitor
http://droughtmonitor.unl.edu/

CLIMOD2 (NRCC data interface):
http://climod2.nrcc.cornell.edu

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Weather Outlook – August 27, 2020

Contributed by NOAA Northeast Regional Climate Center, Cornell University

Last week temperatures ranged from near normal to 6 degrees above normal. Precipitation has ranged from less than a quarter of an inch to an isolated area of over 3 inches in isolated areas. Base 50 growing degree-days ranged from 70-170.

GDD Base 48 Mar 1 - Aug 26 GDD Base 48 May 1 - Aug 26 GDD Base 50 Mar 1 - Aug 26 GDD Base 50 May 1 - Aug 26

Today some early morning showers and thunderstorms from a warm front. Temperatures will warm into the mid 80s to low 90s where the skies clear in southern areas of the state, but only warm into the low to mid 70s in northern areas. A cold front will move through in the afternoon to early evening causing a probable severe weather outbreak. Risks include wind gusts of 70mph or higher, hail larger than 2”, and tornadoes. Heavy rainfall and flash flooding is also possible. Overnight lows will be in the mid 50s to mid 60s with severe weather threat generally ending by 9pm and only lingering rain showers.

Friday temperatures will be in the mid 70s to mid 80s with cloudy conditions and increasing chances of showers and thunderstorms from another warm front. Overnight temperatures will be in the mid 50s to mid 60s with tropical moisture moving in.

Saturday temperatures will be in the 70s, some southeast areas will climb into the 80s, with a chance for severe storms and will have tropical moisture from the remnants of Hurricane Laura. Heavy rain and flash flooding are possible. Overnight temperatures will be in the 50s.

Sunday highs will be in the upper 60s to mid 70s with scattered showers possible. Overnight temperatures will be in the mid 40s to mid 50s.

Monday temperatures will be in the upper 60s to mid 70s. Overnight temperatures will be in the upper 40s to mid 50s.

Tuesday highs will be in the 70s with scattered shower and thunderstorms possible. Overnight temperatures will be in the 50s.

Wednesday highs will be in the 70s with showers and thunderstorms possible. Overnight temperatures will be in the 50s.

The seven-day precipitation amounts will range from 1.25” to over 4.00” inches.

The 8-14 day outlook (September 3-9) favors above-normal temperatures and favors above-normal precipitation.

Maps of 8-14 day outlooks:
http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/predictions/814day/index.php

National Weather Service watch/warnings map:
http://www.weather.gov/erh/

US Drought Monitor
http://droughtmonitor.unl.edu/

CLIMOD2 (NRCC data interface):
http://climod2.nrcc.cornell.edu

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Weather Outlook – August 13, 2020

Contributed by NOAA Northeast Regional Climate Center, Cornell University

Last week temperatures ranged from near normal to 6 degrees above normal. Precipitation has ranged from a trace to over 4 inches in isolated areas. Base 50 growing degree-days ranged from 90-190.

GDD Base 48  Mar 1 - Aug 12 GDD Base 48 May 1 - Aug 12 GDD Base 50 Mar 1 - Aug 12 GDD Base 50 May 1 - Aug 12

Today temperatures will be in the 80s with mostly dry conditions; southeast NY could see an isolated shower or thunderstorm. Overnight lows will be in the low to mid 60s.

Friday temperatures will be in the low to mid 80s with a few scattered showers in eastern NY. Overnight temperatures will be in the 60s.

Saturday temperatures will be in the low to mid 80s with some scattered showers and thunderstorms. Overnight temperatures will be in the 60s.

Sunday highs will be in the mid 70s to low 80s with showers likely in western NY, and scattered showers for the rest of the state. Overnight temperatures will be in the 50s to low 60s.

Monday temperatures will be in the 70s with scattered showers and thunderstorms from a passing cold front, the timing of this is still uncertain. Overnight temperatures will be in the mid 50s to low 60s.

Tuesday highs will be in the 70s and mostly dry. Overnight temperatures will be in the 50s to low 60s.

Wednesday highs will be in the 70s and dry. Overnight temperatures will be in the 50s to low 60s.

The seven-day precipitation amounts will range from 0.25” to 1.25” inches.

The 8-14 day outlook (August 20-26) favors above-normal temperatures and favors near- to below-normal precipitation.

Maps of 8-14 day outlooks:
http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/predictions/814day/index.php

National Weather Service watch/warnings map:
http://www.weather.gov/erh/

US Drought Monitor
http://droughtmonitor.unl.edu/

CLIMOD2 (NRCC data interface):
http://climod2.nrcc.cornell.edu

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Weather Outlook – August 6, 2020

Contributed by NOAA Northeast Regional Climate Center, Cornell University

Last week temperatures ranged from near normal to 6 degrees above normal. Precipitation has ranged from a quarter of an inch to over 4 inches. Base 50 growing degree-days ranged from 110-210.

GDD Base 48 Mar 1 - Aug 5 GDD Base 48 May 1 - Aug 5 GDD Base 50 Mar 1 - Aug 5 GDD Base 50 May 1 - Aug 5

Today will be cool and dry with temperatures in the mid 70s to low 80s. Overnight lows will be in the mid 50s to mid 60s with scattered showers possible.

Friday temperatures will be in the mid 70s to low 80s with scattered showers and thunderstorms. Overnight temperatures will be in the upper 50s to low 60s.

Saturday temperatures will be in the mid 70s to mid 80s with some lingering morning showers and then afternoon scattered showers and thunderstorms. Overnight temperatures will be in the upper 50s to low 60s.

Sunday will be sunny with highs in the 80s. Overnight temperatures will be in the 60s.

Monday temperatures will be in the mid 80s to low 90s with increasing humidity and a slight chance for scattered showers and thunderstorms. Overnight temperatures will be in the mid to upper 60s.

Tuesday highs will be in the mid 80s to low 90s with a chance for scattered showers and thunderstorms, some storms could be severe. Overnight temperatures will be in the mid to upper 60s.

Wednesday highs will be in the 80s to low 90s with a slight chance for scattered showers and thunderstorms. Overnight temperatures will be in the mid to upper 60s.

The seven-day precipitation amounts will range from 0.10” to 1.25” inches.

The 8-14 day outlook (August13-19) favors above-normal temperatures and slightly favors below-normal precipitation.

Maps of 8-14 day outlooks:
http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/predictions/814day/index.php

National Weather Service watch/warnings map:
http://www.weather.gov/erh/

US Drought Monitor:
http://droughtmonitor.unl.edu/

CLIMOD2 (NRCC data interface):
http://climod2.nrcc.cornell.edu

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Weather Outlook – July 30, 2020

Contributed by NOAA Northeast Regional Climate Center, Cornell University

Last week temperatures ranged from 2 to 8 degrees above normal. Precipitation has ranged from a hundredth of an inch to over 4 inches. Base 50 growing degree-days ranged from 110-210.

GDD Base 48 March 1 - July 29 GDD Base 48 May 1 - July 29 GDD Base 50 March 1 - July 29 GDD Base 50 May 1 - July 29

Today temperatures will in the mid 70s to upper 80s with a chance for scattered showers and thunderstorms. Overnight lows will be in the mid 50s to low 60s.

Friday temperatures will be in the uppers 70s to mid 80s with mostly sunny skies, isolated showers and thunderstorms are possible. Overnight temperatures will be in the mid 50s to low 60s.

Saturday temperatures will be in the upper 70s to 80s with gradually increasing clouds and slight chance for afternoon showers and thunderstorms. Overnight temperatures will be in the low to mid 60s.

Sunday will be with highs in the upper 70s to mid 80s with showers and thunderstorms likely; heavy downpours are possible. Overnight temperatures will be in the mid 60s with rain continuing.

Monday temperatures will be in the upper 70s to mid 80s with on and off scattered showers. Track of Tropical Storm Isaias could bring heavy rainfall to parts of NY, lots of uncertainty at this time. Overnight temperatures will be in the 60s.

Tuesday highs will be in the mid 70s to low 80s with on and off scattered showers. Overnight temperatures will be in the 60s.

Wednesday highs will be in the mid 70s to low 80s with slight chance for showers. Overnight temperatures will be in the 60s.

The seven-day precipitation amounts will range from 0.75 inch to over 3inches. There is the potential for higher totals depending on the track of moisture from Tropical Storm Isaias.

The 8-14 day outlook (August 6-12) slightly favors above-normal temperatures and slightly favors below-normal precipitation for all but western to central NY.

Maps of 8-14 day outlooks:
http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/predictions/814day/index.php

National Weather Service watch/warnings map:
http://www.weather.gov/erh/

US Drought Monitor
http://droughtmonitor.unl.edu/

CLIMOD2 (NRCC data interface):
http://climod2.nrcc.cornell.edu

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Weather Outlook – July 23, 2020

Contributed by NOAA Northeast Regional Climate Center, Cornell University

Last week temperatures ranged from 2 to 6 degrees above normal. Precipitation has ranged from a hundredth of an inch to near 4 inches. Base 50 growing degree-days ranged from 110-210.

GDD Base 48 Mar 1 - July 22 GDD Base 48 May 1 - July 22 GDD Base 50 Mar 1 - July 22 GDD Base 50 May 1 - July 22

Today temperatures will in the 80s with humid conditions. Scattered showers and thunderstorms are expected, some could reach severe stage with isolated damaging winds, hail, and localized heavy rainfall. Overnight lows will be in the upper 50s to upper 60s.

Friday temperatures will be in the mid 70s to mid 80s with clearing conditions. Overnight temperatures will be in the mid 50s to mid 60s.

Saturday temperatures will be in upper 70s to low 90s with increased humidity. Overnight temperatures will be in the mid 50s to mid 60s.

Sunday will be with highs in the 80s to low 90s with increased humidity. Overnight temperatures will be in the 60s to low 70s with showers possible.

Monday temperatures will be in the 80s to low 90s. A cold front will bring showers and thunderstorms.  Overnight temperatures will be in the 60s.

Tuesday highs will be in the 80s with scattered showers and thunderstorms. Overnight temperatures will be in the mid 50s to mid 60s.

Wednesday highs will be in the 70s and 80s with scattered showers and thunderstorms. Overnight temperatures will be in the mid 50s to mid 60s.

The seven-day precipitation amounts will range from 0.5 inch to 1.75 inches.

The 8-14 day outlook (July 30-August 5) slightly favors above-normal temperatures and slightly favors below-normal precipitation.

Maps of 8-14 day outlooks:
http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/predictions/814day/index.php

National Weather Service watch/warnings map:
http://www.weather.gov/erh/

US Drought Monitor
http://droughtmonitor.unl.edu/

CLIMOD2 (NRCC data interface):
http://climod2.nrcc.cornell.edu

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Drought-Stressed Soybeans: Keep an Eye Out for Spider Mites

Jaime Cummings and Ken Wise (NYS IPM), Mike Stanyard (CCE NWNY), and Elson Shields (Cornell Entomology)

soybean field and leaf
Spider mite damage to edge of soybean field and individual leaf (photos by Mike Stanyard, CCE)

Widespread drought conditions are stressing the crops, and may lead to flare ups of two-spotted spider mites in some soybean fields.  We’ve already heard some reports of low to moderate spider mite infestations in a few fields in western NY, and could expect more in coming weeks if the weather stays hot and dry.  If left unchecked, even a moderate infestation can result in 10-15% yield loss.  As with any pest, it’s best to understand why they are problematic and what the best management practices are.

Magnified photo
Two-spotted spider mites through magnifier (photo by Mike Stanyard, CCE)

Spider mites are tiny, eight-legged critters that can spin webs like spiders.  In fact, they spin little web parachutes to catch the wind and blow into your fields.  They prefer hot, dry conditions, where they can reproduce rapidly with multiple generations completed every 7 – 21 days.  Infestations typically start at field margins, usually in the lower canopy, but can quickly spread throughout a field.  The spider mites are difficult to see individually with the naked eye, but their feeding causes obvious damage.  Feeding injury results in stippling (or speckled-like) appearance of leaves, as the mites colonize and feed on the lower surfaces of soybean leaves.  These speckles start out as almost a silver color, but later can turn yellow or brown.  Severe feeding damage can cause entire leaves to become curled and necrotic, reducing photosynthesis, and potentially even resulting in death of severely affected plants.  Webbing will be obvious on the underside of infested leaves, as may be the small, white shed skins from molting individuals.  You can shake a damaged plant onto a piece of paper or hood of your vehicle to knock the mites off to see them.  Check out this video of spider mite activity on a corn leaf by Mike Stanyard, CCE.

Closeup of soybean leaves
Spider mite damaged leaf with mites on webbing, and mites congregating at tip of leaf (photos by Mike Stanyard, CCE)

The mites have piercing-sucking mouth parts, which penetrate the leaves and consume the plant sap, similar to how aphids feed.  This makes things worse for the already drought-stressed plants.  Damaged plants may be prematurely defoliated or stunted, resulting in fewer pods and fewer beans per pod.  This can all happen very quickly when conditions are ripe for population explosions of this pest.

soybean leaf
Soybean leaf heavily infested with spider mites (photo by Mike Stanyard, CCE)

Spider mites are always present at low levels in crops and surrounding weeds or hedgerows.  They are typically kept in check by natural populations of parasitic fungi and beneficial insects.  Unfortunately, the hot, dry weather that favors spider mite outbreaks isn’t favorable for these naturally occurring biocontrol agents.   Staying ahead of the pest by knowing when to expect them and keeping weedy field margins mowed to minimize reservoir habitats are a good way to start.  The best and easiest way to manage spider mites is with persistent rainfall, but we can’t control the weather!  Pay attention to the forecast, and if moderate moisture is predicted, you may be able to avoid taking other action.  But, if the forecast is for continued hot and dry conditions, then you should scout your soybean fields weekly.  There is no specific economic or action threshold for spider mites.  Scouting to catch damage early and knowing the forecast will help you make the best decision on whether or not to spray.  If you catch them early, you may be able to spray just the affected field margin and approximately the surrounding 100 feet to contain them.  For small fields, you may need to treat the entire field.  It’s important to know that none of the insecticides target the eggs, so there may be a resurgence following the first spray if there are many eggs present and if favorable conditions persist.  Below is a table of registered insecticides labeled for spider mites in NY as of July 2020.  Remember to read and follow all label instructions when using any pesticides.

Table of insecticides registered for use on spider mites in NYS

Disclaimer: Read pesticide labels prior to use. The information contained here is not a substitute for a pesticide label. Trade names used herein are for convenience only; no endorsement of products is intended, nor is criticism of unnamed products implied. Laws and labels change. It is your responsibility to use pesticides legally. Always consult with your local Cooperative Extension office for legal and recommended practices and products. cce.cornell.edu/localoffices

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