Cornell Field Crops News

Timely Field Crops information for the New York Agricultural Community

July 19, 2018
by Cornell Field Crops
Comments Off on Weather Outlook –July 19, 2018

Weather Outlook –July 19, 2018

NOAA Northeast Regional Climate Center, Cornell University

Last week temperatures were near-normal to 6 degrees above-normal. Precipitation has ranged from a trace to 4”. Base 50 growing degree-days ranged from 100-180. Moderate drought expanded in western NY, where the rain has missed; abnormally dry conditions expanded farther north.

Dry sunny weather to end the week, unsettled weather starting over the weekend.

Today will be dry and sunny with temperatures in the mid 70s to low 80s. Overnight lows will be in the upper 40s to low 60s.

Friday highs will be in the mid 70s to low 90s with sunny and slightly humid conditions. Overnight temperatures will be in the 60s with light scattered showers possible in western NY.

Saturday temperatures will be in the upper 70s to 80s with light scattered showers possible in western NY. Overnight temperatures will be in the 60s with scattered showers and thunderstorms beginning in some areas.

Sunday highs will be in the 70s to low 80s with widespread showers and scattered thunderstorms. The potential exists for flooding for some areas. Overnight temperatures will be in the 60s.

Monday temperatures will be in the mid 70s to 80s with scattered showers and thunderstorms. Overnight temperatures will be in the 60s.

Tuesday highs will be in the mid 70s to 80s with scattered showers and thunderstorms. Overnight temperatures will be in the 60s.

Wednesday possible scattered thunderstorms with in the 80s. Overnight temperatures will be in the 60s.

The seven-day precipitation amounts will range from one and a quarter inches in western areas up to 5 inches in southeast NY.

The 8-14 day outlook (July 26 – Aug 1) favors near-normal temperatures for most of the state, slightly favoring below-normal temperatures for extreme western NY and slightly favoring above-normal temperatures in part of eastern NY. The precipitation outlook favors above-normal precipitation for all of the state.

Maps of 8-14 day outlooks:
http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/predictions/814day/index.php

National Weather Service watch/warnings map:
http://www.weather.gov/erh/

US Drought Monitor
http://droughtmonitor.unl.edu/Home.aspx

Drought Impact Reporter:
http://droughtreporter.unl.edu/map

CLIMOD2 (NRCC data interface):
http://climodtest.nrcc.cornell.edu

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July 16, 2018
by Cornell Field Crops
Comments Off on Soil Health Experts from Fertilizer Institute in Washington, DC; Cornell University, CCE to Speak at 2018 Empire Farm Days

Soil Health Experts from Fertilizer Institute in Washington, DC; Cornell University, CCE to Speak at 2018 Empire Farm Days

The Soil Health Seminars programming at the 2018 Empire Farm Days at Rodman Lott and Son Farms in Seneca Falls, NY, will provide the opportunity to hear from soil specialists, learn from farming peers in daily panel presentations, see tabletop demonstrations, tour never cover crop plots, and have a soil report created for your use. The presentations are free and organized by the New York State Interagency Soil Health Working Group.

The featured speaker at the Soil Health Center at 9:30 am on Tuesday, August 7, 2018, will be Sally A. Flis, Ph.D., director of agronomy at The Fertilizer Institute, Washington, DC. She will share an update on 4R research and discuss how to adjust fertilizer management for soil health-building practices such as no-till, reduced till, cover crops, legumes in rotation, and manure management, and how growing conditions in the Northeast effect 4R management.

On Wednesday, August 8, at 9:30 am, Harold M. van Es, a 30-year professor of soil science at Cornell University will discuss why healthy soil is the foundation of sustainable crop production and how understanding interactions among the physical, biological, and chemical aspects of soil is key to good soil health management practices, including how to enhance soil organic matter. The audience will learn how reducing tillage and adding cover crops and organic amendments result in increasing the quality and quantity of organic matter to benefit soils and crops.

The Thursday, August 9 speaker at 9:30 am at the Soil Health Center at Empire Farm Days will be Cornell University Cooperative Extension Field Crops Specialist Michael E. Hunter addressing “Weed Management for Cover Cropping and Conservation Tillage Systems.” Mike will cover the challenge of managing residual herbicides in soil health cropping systems that include cover crops, interseeding, diverse rotations, and no-till or strip tillage in the Northeast. Cover crop termination and herbicide resistance management strategies will also be discussed.

Daily at 10:30 am, King’s Agriseeds and Seedway representatives will lead tours of the side-by-side field trials of new cover crop single species and mixes, including stress-tolerant summer annuals for no-till and conventional till systems; combinations for dealing with soil compaction and adding organic matter; pollinator- and butterfly-friendly mixes; crops for use after small grain or vegetables; and natural biofumigants.

At 11:30 am each day, farmers from across New York State will participate in panel discussions as follows:

Tuesday, August 7: Soil Health Management Practices and Fertilizer and Manure Management When Incorporating Cover Crops and Reduced Tillage Into Their Systems;

Wednesday, August 8: Challenges and Benefits of Building Organic Matter and Soil, Water and Nutrient Interactions Using Soil Health Management Systems; and

Thursday, August 9: Challenges of Managing Herbicides Within Systems That Incorporate Cover Crops, Reduced Tillage and Diverse Rotations.

Empire Farm Days is the largest outdoor agricultural trade show in the Northeastern U.S. Show hours, daily schedules, directions and information about exhibitors, demonstrations, ride and drive opportunities, live animal programming and more are posted at www.empirefarmdays.com. Also see Facebook and Instagram.

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July 16, 2018
by Cornell Field Crops
Comments Off on Weather Outlook –July 12, 2018

Weather Outlook –July 12, 2018

NOAA Northeast Regional Climate Center, Cornell University

Last week temperatures were near-normal to 4 degrees above-normal. Precipitation has ranged from a trace to 2”. Base 50 growing degree-days ranged from 100-180. Abnormally dry conditions have been expanded for part of NY and moderate drought has been introduced in some areas.

Monday temperatures will be in the 80s to mid 90s with humid conditions and a chance for afternoon thunderstorms. Overnight temperatures will be in the 60s to low 70s.

Tuesday highs will be in the 80s to low 90s. A cold front will bring showers and thunderstorms, with heavy rainfall, flooding, and gusty winds possible for some areas. Overnight temperatures will be in the 60s.

Wednesday will be dry with highs will be in the 80s. Overnight temperatures will be in the 60s.

The seven-day precipitation amounts will range from one inch to one an three quarters of an inch.

The 8-14 day outlook (July 19-25) favors above-normal temperatures for all of the state. The precipitation outlook is split with extreme western to northern NY slightly favored for below-normal rainfall and extreme southeast NY slightly favored for above-normal rainfall.

Maps of 8-14 day outlooks:
http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/predictions/814day/index.php

National Weather Service watch/warnings map:
http://www.weather.gov/erh/

US Drought Monitor
http://droughtmonitor.unl.edu/Home.aspx

Drought Impact Reporter:
http://droughtreporter.unl.edu/map

CLIMOD2 (NRCC data interface):
http://climodtest.nrcc.cornell.edu

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July 6, 2018
by Cornell Field Crops
Comments Off on Worker Protection and Pesticide Handling Training Added Daily at Empire Farm Days: Regulatory Update, Federal Changes, Re-certification Credit

Worker Protection and Pesticide Handling Training Added Daily at Empire Farm Days: Regulatory Update, Federal Changes, Re-certification Credit

Empire Farm Days has announced the addition of a 2018 DEC Regulatory Update and Worker Protection Standard Program for the August 7-9, 2018 show at Rodman Lott and Son Farms, 2973 State Route 414, Seneca Falls, NY. The program will take place daily at 9:30 am at Lot 409 on the showgrounds.

The one-hour program will provide an overview of New York State Department of Environmental Conservation and federal regulations relating to the application of pesticides in New York State. The one-hour training will highlight the Worker Protection Standard and how recent changes, such as mandatory respiratory fit testing and training, application exclusion zone, and annual worker and handler training, may affect operations.

One hour of DEC credit is available to attendees with a Pesticide Certification ID Card who sign in on time and sign out on completion of the program. The certification categories to be covered are CORE, 1A, 21, 22, 23, 24 and 25.

Those not yet certified will learn how to qualify to make pesticide applications.

Empire Farm Days showcases working equipment, crops and live animal demonstrations; seminars; test driving opportunities; and training on the latest farming techniques, products, safety practices, and equipment with more than 600 exhibitors.

Hundreds of agriculture-related vendors, organizations, colleges and associations are on site with information.

Show hours are 9am-5pm on Tuesday, August 7 and Wednesday, August 8 and 9am-4pm on Thursday, August 9. Parking is $10 per vehicle. For daily schedules and more information, visit www.empirefarmdays.com or call 877-697-7837.

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July 5, 2018
by Cornell Field Crops
Comments Off on Weather Outlook –July 5, 2018

Weather Outlook –July 5, 2018

NOAA Northeast Regional Climate Center, Cornell University

Last week temperatures ranged from 2-10 degrees above-normal. Precipitation has ranged from less than ¼ “ to over 3”. Base 50 growing degree-days ranged from 130-210. Abnormally dry conditions have been expanded for part of northern NY and the finger lake region.

Another hot day Thursday before a cold front brings storms and cooler weather.

Today temperatures will be in the mid 80s to mid 90s and muggy. Heat advisories will continue for some areas. A cold front will bring showers and thunderstorms, some possibly severe with heavy rain and flooding, mostly to central and western NY. Overnight lows will be in the mid 50s to mid 60s.

Friday will start rainy for some areas as another, stronger cold front moves through Thursday night into Friday morning, showers will diminish from west to east with cooler temperatures following. Highs will be in the 70s to low 80s. Overnight temperatures will be in the mid 40s to mid 50s.

Saturday will be sunny with temperatures in the 70s to low 80s with lower humidity. Overnight temperatures will be in the upper 40s to upper 50s. Sunday highs will be in the 70s to low 80s . Overnight temperatures will be in the upper 40s to upper 50s.

Monday temperatures will be in the mid 70s to 80s . Overnight temperatures will be in the upper 40s to upper 50s with showers and thunderstorms possible into Tuesday.

Tuesday will have temperatures in the upper 70s to 80s. Overnight temperatures will be in the 50s.

Wednesday will be dry with highs in the 80s. Overnight temperatures will be in the 50s.

The seven-day precipitation amounts will range from a trace to one inch.

The 8-14 day outlook (July 12-18) favors above-normal temperatures for all of the state. The precipitation outlook slightly favors above-normal amounts for most of the state and favors near-normal precipitation for the northeast corner of the state.

Maps of 8-14 day outlooks:
http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/predictions/814day/index.php

National Weather Service watch/warnings map:
http://www.weather.gov/erh/

US Drought Monitor
http://droughtmonitor.unl.edu/Home.aspx

Drought Impact Reporter:
http://droughtreporter.unl.edu/map

CLIMOD2 (NRCC data interface):
http://climodtest.nrcc.cornell.edu

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July 3, 2018
by Cornell Field Crops
Comments Off on July 31: Reduced Tillage Field Day in Willsboro

July 31: Reduced Tillage Field Day in Willsboro

Strip tilling with cover crops; photo: Ryan Maher

In-field demonstrations with agricultural specialists and growers from NY and Vermont and six learning stations are all part of the Reduced Tillage in Organic Systems Field Day to be held Tuesday, July 31, 2018, from 9 am to 3 pm at the Cornell Willsboro Research Farm, 48 Sayward Lane, Willsboro, NY. The event is free to attend.

The overall focus of the day on improving soil health was developed to meet grower requests. While the event is geared toward organic vegetable, row crop, and small grain growers, the practices discussed will also benefit conventional growers.

Decreasing soil disturbance maintains diverse and active biological activity that is critical for well-functioning, healthy soil. Reducing tillage intensity and mechanical soil disturbance can improve soil health. Over time, this helps maintain or increase crop yields, while reducing production costs due to saved labor, equipment wear, and fuel,” notes organizer Amy Ivy, a vegetable specialist with Cornell Cooperative Extension, Clinton County.

The field day topics include roller-crimping, zone tillage in high residue, in-row cultivation tools, stale seedbed and weed seed bank management strategies and grower experiences with reduced tillage on their farms.

The field day speakers are Jean-Paul Courtens, Roxbury Farm, Kinderhook, NY; University of Vermont Agronomist Heather Darby; Cornell Willsboro Research Farm Manager Mike Davis; Jack Lazor, Butterwork Farm, Westfield, VT; Chuck Bornt, Cornell Cooperative Extension Eastern NY Commercial Horticulture Program; Bryan Brown and Ryan Maher, Cornell Small Farms Program; Kitty O’Neil, Cornell Cooperative Extension North Country Regional Ag Team; and Cornell University Weed Ecology and Management Professor John Wallace.

Participants at the day-long event will rotate between three demonstration and discussion stations in the morning and three in the afternoon. Lunch is included. The first 50 attendees will receive a program resource booklet.

The Eastern NY Commercial Horticulture Program, Cornell Cooperative Extension of Essex County and the Cornell Willsboro Research Farm coordinated this field day with funding support from the New York State Soil Health Initiative, Lake Champlain Basin Program, and the farmer-driven Northern New York Agricultural Development Program.

For more information, contact Amy Ivy, Cornell Cooperative Extension Clinton County, 518-561-7450, adi2@cornell.edu.

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July 3, 2018
by Cornell Field Crops
Comments Off on Corn and Soybean Surveys Alert NNY Farmers to Disease Trends

Corn and Soybean Surveys Alert NNY Farmers to Disease Trends

White mold discovered in soybeans in NNY in 2017; photos: Mike Hunter, CCE

As Northern New York farmers scout corn and soybean fields for any diseases that may impact crop health and yield, they can use five years’ worth of survey results as a guide to newly-emerging and common crop pathogens in Clinton, Essex, Franklin, Jefferson, Lewis and St. Lawrence counties.

The corn and soybean disease survey project is funded by the farmer-driven Northern New York Agricultural Development Program. In addition to identifying current areas of concern and trends, the project provides regional farmers with the expertise of Cornell Cooperative Extension specialists who scout 12 sentinel fields of corn and 21 sentinel fields of soybeans. These fields on Northern New York Farms represent different soils and growing conditions, and a variety of cropping practices.

Fields are assessed at various stages of crop growth. The Bergstrom Lab at Cornell University in Ithaca, N.Y., has cultured and analyzed field samples since 2013.

“Multi-year surveys better capture variations in weather from year-to-year, from a wet spring to drought in the past five years. The data helps farmers make more informed corn and soybean variety selections, evaluate soil and crop debris for potential problems, and plan management strategy,” said project leader and Cornell plant pathologist Dr. Gary C. Bergstrom, Ithaca, N.Y.

This disease survey project was started in 2013 as the first systematic assessment of corn and soybean diseases conducted in Northern New York in recent decades.

Results of the most recent NNY corn disease survey by county is online at https://fieldcrops.cals.cornell.edu/corn/diseases-corn/corn-disease-survey/.

A statewide soybean disease survey is online at https://fieldcrops.cals.cornell.edu/soybeans/diseases-soybeans/soybean-disease-survey/.

For more information, contact Cornell Cooperative Extension North Country Field Crop Specialists Kitty O’Neil, 315-854-1218, and Mike Hunter, 315-788-8450.

Funding for the Northern New York Agricultural Development Program is supported by the New York State Senate and administered by the New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets. Learn more at www.nnyagdev.org.

 

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July 2, 2018
by Cornell Field Crops
Comments Off on True/Common Armyworm (Pseudaletia unipuncta) Alert – Northern NY

True/Common Armyworm (Pseudaletia unipuncta) Alert – Northern NY

From Ken Wise: Eastern NYS Extension IPM Specialist- Livestock and Field Crops

Mike Hunter (CCE Northern NY) is finding a lot of true armyworm in grass hay fields in Northern NY. He states the larvae are still very small (1 mm to 1.5 mm) and are in the 1st instar. These armyworm moths most likely have come on the recent storms from the south and laid their eggs in hay fields.  If there is a lot in the field you will not see much damage until they reach the later instars. True armyworm larvae in their (6th) final instar will eat 80% of  all the forage they will consume. Many times a hay field can look great in the evening and gone the next day if they all reach the 6th instar about the same time.

It is best to scout your fields ASAP and look for smaller larvae. Be proactive make sure you know if your fields are infested. True armyworm will feed on grasses, corn and small grains. There are economic thresholds  for corn and small grains.

Recommended economic thresholds for corn:

  • seedling: 10 percent or more plants show damage and larvae are still present.
  • whorl-stage: apply an insecticide when there are three or more larvae per plant.
  • Tall corn seldom needs treatment unless the leaves above the ear are also damaged.

Recommended economic thresholds for small grains:

  • Wheat/small grains – 5 or more larvae per linear ft of row, larvae less than 1.25 inches and not parasitized, watch for flag leaf reduction or if grain heads clipped off – yield losses, a spray before soft dough to save the remaining 3 upper leaves is generally beneficial since these tissues are still important to grain filling

Recommended economic thresholds for grasses:

  • Grasses – no specific guidelines available, need for treatment based on the level of damage observed in relation to the expected value of grass harvest

Most years, natural enemies—various fungal and viral diseases as well as parasites such as tachinid flies—help suppress armyworms. You cannot be sure when and where they occur.

Sometimes when armyworms are at very high populations they will march to new fields. They can be in a hay field and move to a corn or small grains field.

SPECIAL NOTE: if you spray for armyworm the CROP and True/Common Armyworm has to be on the label! READ THE LABEL!!!!!

Check the Cornell Guide for Integrated Crop Management for an insecticide labeled for use.

I have added some web links that have specific armyworm information:

http://blogs.cornell.edu/ipmwpr/true-armyworm-aka-common-armyworm-pseudaletia-unipuncta-in-field-corn/

Armyworm (Pseudaletia unipuncta Haworth)

Armyworm as a Pest of Field Corn

Cornell Guide for Integrated Field Crop Management

Armyworm Damage to Field Corn and Grass Hay and Pasture

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July 2, 2018
by Cornell Field Crops
Comments Off on NYS IPM Weekly Field Crops Pest Report – July 2, 2018

June 28, 2018
by Cornell Field Crops
Comments Off on Weather Outlook –June 28, 2018

Weather Outlook –June 28, 2018

NOAA Northeast Regional Climate Center, Cornell University

Last week temperatures ranged from 8 degrees below normal to near- normal. Precipitation has ranged from less than ¼ “ to 2”. Base 50 growing degree-days ranged from 50-130. Abnormally dry conditions have been expanded for part of central NY.

HOT and humid over the weekend.

Today rain showers and isolated thunderstorms will continue as a system moves across the state; heavy rainfall possible for the Hudson Valley Region. Showers will diminish from west to east with temperatures in the 70s to low 80s and muggy. Overnight lows will be in the mid 50s to mid 60s.

Friday will be mostly sunny and warmer with highs in the 80s to near 90, but with lower humidity. Overnight temperatures will be in the upper 50s to mid 60s.

Saturday temperatures will be in the mid 80s to mid 90s, with sunny, hot, and humid conditions. Heat indices could reach the 100s. Overnight temperatures will be in the 60s to mid 70s.

Sunday highs will be in the upper 80s and 90s, as hot & humid conditions continue. Heat indices could reach the 100s. Overnight temperatures will be in the 60s to mid 70s.

Monday temperatures will be in the 80s to mid 90s with humid conditions and a chance for scattered showers and thunderstorms. Heat indices could reach the 100s. Overnight temperatures will be in the 60s to low 70s.

Tuesday will be partly to mostly cloudy with highs will be in the upper 70s to low 90s, with humid conditions and showers and thunderstorms possible. Overnight temperatures will be in the 60s.

Wednesday will be partly to mostly cloudy with highs will be in the upper 70s to low 90s, with humid conditions and showers and thunderstorms possible. Overnight temperatures will be in the 60s.

The seven-day precipitation amounts will range from a trace to one inch.

The 8-14 day outlook (July 5-11) favors above-normal temperatures for all of the state. The precipitation outlook favors near-normal amounts.

Maps of 8-14 day outlooks:
http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/predictions/814day/index.php

National Weather Service watch/warnings map:
http://www.weather.gov/erh/

US Drought Monitor
http://droughtmonitor.unl.edu/Home.aspx

Drought Impact Reporter:
http://droughtreporter.unl.edu/map

CLIMOD2 (NRCC data interface):
http://climodtest.nrcc.cornell.edu

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