Stocker Short Course to start June 24

Stocker Cattle – an opportunity for the grazing entrepreneur.

Calves purchased/raised for grazing, then sold to a finisher. The term “stocker” was coined by producers referring to animals purchased in the spring to “stock” mountain pastures.  The goal is to add weight economically using relatively inexpensive, excess pasture.

How can you (seasoned, new-to-farming or thinking about becoming a farmer), get in on this phenomenal opportunity?

The Stocker Short Course (SSC) to begin June 24th – Sign up NOW!

The course will run on the last Saturday of every month from 10 am – 2 pm, June 2017 to May 2018.   Most sessions will be held in the Hornell/Alfred region, other on-site locations to be determined by the topic.

Topics of study will include
•    land acquisition
•    cattle procurement
•    grazing management
•    nutrition and health
•    economics and marketing

Internship participation available.   Students completing the course will leave with a business plan, practical experience and knowledge to support their entry into the stocker business.

Cost for the course is $200/person, $100/second person from same farm and/or family. Space is limited to 30 persons, so contact us very soon.

Interested parties should contact Barb Jones, Cornell University Department of Animal Science, bjj6@cornell.edu, 607-255-7712. For additional information, contact Mike Baker, Cornell Beef Extension Specialist, mjb28@cornell.edu, 607-255-5923.  The Stocker Short Course is funded by the NYS Department of Agriculture and Markets “Southern Tier Stocker Initiative”.

First Cutting Updates – Utilizing Alfalfa Heights as a Predictor for Quality

The SCNY team is monitoring alfalfa heights again this spring to help predict quality and %NDF for first cutting hay crop.  Alfalfa height has been proven to be a reliable indicator of NDF values in the field for alfalfa, alfalfa/grass mixed and all grass stands.  Results will be compiled and emailed on a weekly basis – please feel free to forward on.  To be included on the weekly email, or to be removed from the email, please contact Betsy Hicks, bjh246@cornell.edu.

UPDATES FOR THE WEEK OF MAY 22nd, 2017:

Mowing for all hay stands is well underway across the region.  Some farms took advantage of the bit of nice weather and have finished up their first crop for their milking herd.
Points for the last week:
•    Growth of alfalfa across the region reached anywhere from over 3” to almost 10” where there was ample sunlight and minimal rain/cloud activity.
•    A weather event late last weekend that included hail damaged some alfalfa stands north and east of Cortland – fields were harvested soon after.
•    In alfalfa, everything is either early bud or mid bud stage.  The breaking point for mid-bud is about 30”.
•    There are some fields in the southern portion of our region that are dealing with alfalfa weevil and fields have been damaged.
•    Heavy grass fields that have some alfalfa mixed with them seem to have alfalfa that is struggling.  Orchard grass especially in mixed fields was towering over alfalfa.
Weather forecast looks like rain Thursday/Friday and Sunday/Monday.  Slight chances of rain for next week every day (20%) but I’m sure there will be hay weather to be had.

Thoughts on pure grass fields that are past peak quality:  If you are able to segregate your first cutting, you may want to leave your fields that are past peak quality and save them for dry cow or heifer feed and focus on getting your mixed fields in at peak quality.  Certainly, field conditions will play a role, but yield can be a factor to take into account as well.

Please let us know conditions you observe while harvesting, and any comments back about the alfalfa height project are appreciated!  We also welcome any sample results you would like to share, so forward them on me, bjh246@cornell.edu.  You can also post harvest pictures on our team’s Facebook page – https://www.facebook.com/SCNYDairyandFieldCropsTeam/ and use the hashtag #harvest2017.

Thank you, and stay safe!
Betsy

Additional Information:

The numbers that are indicators for using alfalfa heights for NDF content are as follows:
•    100% grass stands should be cut when nearby alfalfa is 14 inches tall, to achieve 50% NDF
•    50/50 mixed alfalfa/grass stands should be cut when nearby alfalfa is 22 inches tall, to achieve 44% NDF
•    100% alfalfa stands should be cut when alfalfa is 28 inches tall, to achieve 40% NDF

Predicted days to cut are based on daily NDF increases for grasses of 1.0% point, 50/50 mixed alfalfa/grass stands of 0.8% points, and alfalfa of 0.5% points and are adjusted for the coming week’s weather.  Typically NDF increases about 0.8 to 1.2 per day for grasses, with cooler weather being the lower end of the range and warmer weather being the higher end.  For alfalfa, NDF increases about 0.4 to 0.7 per day, also dependent upon warm/cool weather.

The weekly email for the month of May will have a table of the locations around the region where we have measured the alfalfa height, as well as the elevation.  Even if your fields aren’t measured, you can use the location and elevation as a guide to conditions that may be similar to your own.  We now cover six counties throughout South Central NY, including Tioga, Chemung, Broome, Tompkins, Cortland and Onondaga.  Other teams and associations throughout the state are also measuring fields.  For more information, contact that county’s association to find out if fields are being measured there.

Betsy J Hicks
Area Dairy Specialist
South Central New York Dairy & Field Crops Team
Cornell Cooperative Extension
60 Central Ave
Room 140
Cortland, NY 13045
518.428.2064 cell
607.391.2673 office
607.391.2680 fax
bjh246@cornell.edu
http://scnydfc.cce.cornell.edu/
https://www.facebook.com/SCNYDairyandFieldCropsTeam/

NRCS-NY Announces Application Cutoff Dates for NRCS Conservation Programs

New York Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) announces June 16, 2017 as the application cutoff date for the Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP) for Fiscal Year (FY) 2018.

Through the EQIP program, NRCS offers financial and technical assistance to participants to implement practices which address priority resource concerns, including soil erosion, water quality and habitat degradation. Focus areas within the EQIP program include the farmstead, soil management, habitat, forestry and grazing. Examples of practices implemented through EQIP include: strip cropping, grassed waterways, forest stand improvement and manure storage facilities.

Applicants applying to implement practices to address farmstead resource concerns associated with livestock operations must provide a copy of their Comprehensive Nutrient Management Plan to NRCS by July 14, 2017. Applicants applying to implement forest management practices must provide their Forest Management Plan by July 14, 2017.

NRCS will review potential resource concerns on the land included and work with applicants to develop a conservation plan to address the identified resource concerns.

Applications accepted after June 16, 2017 will be considered in the next signup. All applications are competitive and are ranked based on national, state and locally identified resource priorities and the overall benefit to the environment.

If you are interested in applying for an NRCS conservation program please visit our web site for information on applying at: http://www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/detail/ny/programs/financial/eqip/?cid=nrcs144p2_027058

 

You may apply by visiting your local NRCS field office, which can be located using the web site: http://offices.sc.egov.usda.gov/locator/app?state=NY.

 

USDA is an Equal Opportunity Provider, Employer, and Lender

First Cutting Updates – Utilizing Alfalfa Heights as a Predictor for Quality

The South Central NY Cornell Cooperative Extension team is monitoring alfalfa heights again this spring to help predict quality and %NDF for first cutting hay crop.  Alfalfa height has been proven to be a reliable indicator of NDF values in the field for alfalfa, alfalfa/grass mixed and all grass stands.  Results will be compiled and emailed on a weekly basis – please feel free to forward on.  To be included on the weekly email, or to be removed from the email, please contact Betsy Hicks, bjh246@cornell.edu.

UPDATES FOR THE WEEK OF MAY 8th, 2017:

Comments from Janice:  We measured slow growth with the wet and cold conditions of the last week.  Our protocol is to measure the tallest alfalfa in the stand, but in older alfalfa and wetter fields, the alfalfa tends to be more uneven.  Keeping this in mind, our field scale measurement should be ground-truthed as you plan for harvest.  Grasses will be headed by next week so if you are harvesting grass or mixed stands for dairy quality they will be ready to mow in the next stretch of decent weather.  Some lodging is beginning in alfalfa over 20”.  No buds are observed yet in alfalfa.  If you have mixed grass/alfalfa stands, refer back to the chart of percent of alfalfa vs grass (attached) and what height alfalfa is to determine when to harvest the field for peak quality.  If you need help determining what percent your stand is, contact me at 607.391.2672 or jgd3@cornell.edu.

Comments for Southern Counties (Broome, Tioga, Chemung, S Cortland):  Most fields saw no more than 2” growth in alfalfa, although some of the valley ground with favorable drainage and a southern slope did see more.  In general, higher elevations and wetter fields only saw 1” of growth with the cool weather.  Even so, predictions for harvesting 50/50 mixed grass/alfalfa stands are stating dairy quality harvest should begin by the middle of next week and grass stands should be harvested now.  Fields in general are drier here than in the counties to the north.  Some farms that have pure grass fields and some mixed fields to the east of our region have started harvest on fields that have dried out enough to drive on.

Comments for Northern Counties (Tompkins, N Cortland, Onondaga):  In general, most all fields saw no more than 2” growth in alfalfa.  Fields are very wet across the northern counties and will likely have some rutting around wet spots if they are to be harvested for dairy quality.  Predictions for peak grass quality is to harvest now, 50/50 mixed grass/alfalfa stands are predicted to be peak at the end of next week, only a couple days behind the more southern counties.

Weather conditions for the coming week look like rain Saturday and Sunday, with warmer weather closer to 70 degrees next week.  I know you all are frustrated with not being able to get corn in the ground, but the focus needs to be on harvesting hay crop at peak quality!  Please let us know conditions you observe while harvesting, and any comments back about the alfalfa height project are appreciated!  We also welcome any sample results you would like to share, so forward them on me, bjh246@cornell.edu.  You can also post harvest pictures on our team’s Facebook page – https://www.facebook.com/SCNYDairyandFieldCropsTeam/ and use the hashtag #harvest2017.

Thank you, and be safe!
Betsy

Additional Information:

The numbers that are indicators for using alfalfa heights for NDF content are as follows:
•    100% grass stands should be cut when nearby alfalfa is 14 inches tall, to achieve 50% NDF
•    50/50 mixed alfalfa/grass stands should be cut when nearby alfalfa is 22 inches tall, to achieve 44% NDF
•    100% alfalfa stands should be cut when alfalfa is 28 inches tall, to achieve 40% NDF
Predicted days to cut are based on daily NDF increases for grasses of 1.0% point, 50/50 mixed alfalfa/grass stands of 0.8% points, and alfalfa of 0.5% points and are adjusted for the coming week’s weather.  Typically NDF increases about 0.8 to 1.2 per day for grasses, with cooler weather being the lower end of the range and warmer weather being the higher end.  For alfalfa, NDF increases about 0.4 to 0.7 per day, also dependent upon warm/cool weather.

The weekly email for the month of May will have a table of the locations around the region where we have measured the alfalfa height, as well as the elevation.  Even if your fields aren’t measured, you can use the location and elevation as a guide to conditions that may be similar to your own.  We now cover six counties throughout South Central NY, including Tioga, Chemung, Broome, Tompkins, Cortland and Onondaga.  Other teams and associations throughout the state are also measuring fields.  For more information, contact that county’s association to find out if fields are being measured there.

Betsy J Hicks
Area Dairy Specialist
South Central New York Dairy & Field Crops Team
Cornell Cooperative Extension
60 Central Ave
Room 140
Cortland, NY 13045
518.428.2064 cell
607.391.2673 office
607.391.2680 fax
bjh246@cornell.edu
http://scnydfc.cce.cornell.edu/
https://www.facebook.com/SCNYDairyandFieldCropsTeam/

Beef Meeting May 16 in Canton

From NNY Beef Producers group:

Greetings all.
This is short notice but there will be a Northern New York Beef Producers meeting next Tuesday, May 16th at The Club Restaurant in Canton at 6pm.  The topics will be Beef Nutrition, Fly Control and Breeding Bull selection/criteria .
Our guest speakers include:
Dr. Steve Sachtleban, Beef Nutritionist- Kent Nutrition Group,
Jasmin Kompare, Territory Sales Manager, Kent Nutrition group,
Rich Brown and Tom Smith, Equity Angus Farm.
Jeff Rosenkrans, Owner of Rosenkrans Feedlot, Trumansburg, NY.

Kent Nutrition is supplying us with two speakers and will cover more than half the cost of the meals. Please bring $10 per person to help us cover the rest. The dinner will be a Roast Beef buffet similar to the April meeting. I do not have everybody’s email addresses so please invite anyone I have missed.
Please RSVP me by this Thursday evening May 11!!!
Joe Eisele- 315-317-2414 Joe@northernlimitsfarm.com

Northern NY Beef Producers Region 8&9
Craig Southworth- President 518-651-4390 c.southworth43@gmail.com
Andy Weaber- Vice Pres- 315-261-1331 andyweaber@gmail.com
Betsy Hodge Tres/Secy 315-244-1298  betsyhodge@twcny.rr.com

Thank you,
Joe

Sale Report _ Finger Lakes Livestock Feeder Sale May 6

Compared to the last sale, Feeder steers sold 6.00-12.00 higher. Feeder heifers sold 5.00-13.00 higher. Holstein steers sold 5.00-20.00 higher. Feeder bulls sold 10.00-14.00 higher. Cattle supply heavy. Demand good for all classes. Feeder cattle supply consisted of 46 percent steers, 5 percent Holstein steers, 36 percent heifers, 13 percent bulls, with 58 percent weighing over 600 lbs. Cattle supply consisted of 611 steers, 455 heifers, and 208 bulls. For a complete report on this and other New York livestock auctions, go to https://www.ams.usda.gov/market-news/livestock-poultry-and-grain-list-reports.

BQA in Cattaraugus County, June 17

BQA in a Day training will be held on Saturday, June 17, 2017, from 9:00 am until 2:00 pm, in Cattaraugus County. The program will begin at the Mansfield Fire Hall, 7960 S Maples Road, Little Valley, NY at 9:00 am with the classroom training and continue after lunch with the hands-on Chute Side Training hosted by Williams Ranch and Cattle, Jeff and Vicky Williams, 7860 Maples Road, Little Valley, NY. Dr. Shannon Carpenter, Veterinarian with the NYS Department of Ag & Markets, will teach this Beef Quality Assurance program. Complete details BQA_Cattaraugus_June.