March 7, 2018

Greenhouse vegetable IPM update 3.7.18

I’d like to be in a warm steamy greenhouse today! My first greenhouse visit was on Monday – makes me believe spring will come!

Podcast by Jud Reid (and others) on Better Greenhouse Practices  And if you scroll down the list of podcasts there are others that might apply

Vegetable varieties with genetic resistance to insects or diseases –in Vegetable MD Online.  Not specifically aimed at greenhouse production but a good resource that Meg McGrath is keeping up!

Interesting article on the impact of entomopathogenic fungi on natural enemies 

This is pretty cool – on–site molecular detection of soil-borne pathogens. Instant verification of a disease?

In looking for information on trap cropping for cucumber beetles, I found this presentation on biological control of cuke beetles in the field.

 

June 23, 2017

First lily leaf beetle parasitoids released in NYS

Ever notice how revolting adolescents can become beautiful adults . . .  in the insect world, of course. (And revolting is the word in this case, as the larvae cover themselves with excrement.)

However, even those beautiful Lily leaf beetle (LLB) adults have the bad habit of feeding on your lily leaves – and getting started as soon as the leaves emerge above the soil.  And they like all true lilies and fritillaria (daylilies are safe).  When the eggs hatch, the larvae join in on the feast.  In some areas, it has become almost impossible to grow lilies!

But don’t give up!  Help is on the way!  The University of Rhode Island Biocontrol Laboratory has tested several tiny wasps that lay eggs in the LLB larvae and tried them out in several New England states.  Luckily, the wasps have set up house and spread from their release sites.  It’s not a quick fix but every little bit helps.

NYS IPM’s Brian Eshenaur is coordinating a project to release the beneficial wasps around NYS (don’t worry, they don’t sting) in coordination with several county Extension offices.  The first release was this week and we are excited to learn if they parasitize the larvae and then spread.  Maybe to a lily bed near you – so you can enjoy growing lilies again.

It’s almost enough to make you appreciate those beautiful beetles . . .

(Richard A. Casagrande, University of Rhode Island, Bugwood.org)

February 26, 2017

Greenhouse IPM Update 2.26.17

Spring?!  I know it’s not but I do like seeing that witch hazel and some snow drops blooming on campus.

And that makes me think of aphids…really?  Well, since Sarah Jandricid reports that foxglove aphids produce more offspring at 50-60F than at higher temperatures, maybe we should be thinking about them.  Especially if you had foxglove aphids last year (they are the one’s with dark green patches at the base of their ‘tailpipes’).  Go look now!

Early – that’s the key word – and here it is in Michael Brownbridge’s article Prevention and Early Intervention:  The Keys to Biocontrol Success in Greenhouse Crops published in Greenhouse Grower

More aphids?  Dan Gilrein’s e-GRO blog post on aphids and calibrachoas (aphids do seem to love them!)

Spring cleaning?  I am trying to reduce the amount of stuff in my office and house (not that you can really tell yet) but the same is true for greenhouses, and even relates to IPM.  Reducing clutter might help figure out where the pests are hiding over the winter (sneaky weeds get everywhere!).

Hooray for alliteration! Premier Tech led me to Pythium and then to Penn State – who have a lot of useful information on plant diseases I hadn’t found before.  Noodle around on the website, there are some listed by crop and other under general diseases.

And back to Pythium – Here’s Penn State’s fact sheet and the one from Premier Tech  and their list of things you can do after planting to minimize root diseases

Just in case you get tired of me telling you about Integrated Pest Management (well, how could you?), here’s the word from Van Belle Nursery with a nice video, too.

Want to read something a little edgy?  Very comprehensive article on the causes of leaf margin issues from Paul Thomas and U of Georgia.  We usually see a few of these every spring!

Wonderful wrigglers?  Not worms but nematodes – the good kind!  A nice article from UMass on using beneficial nematodes.

Boxwood blight – I don’t even have to add the alliteration.  The original article and one where you can see the pictures (which are from Margery Daughtrey!).

Back to bee basics.  Grow wise Bee Smart  BMP’s for bee health in horticulture
http://growwise.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/HRI-Pollinator-BMPs-January2017.pdf

Rent a chicken?  There are a few chicken owners I know but they haven’t capitalized on their bug eating habits yet (that I know off) for greenhouses.

Wow, a lot to cover today!   Must be because it is spring!

Have a great week!

December 20, 2016

Greenhouse IPM Update 12.20.16

Are all your greenhouses tucked up for winter?  And all those poinsettias sold?  Just think, you could be Christmas tree producers!

Do we need another disease on chrysanthemums- especially one carried by thrips?  Are growers seeing this in NYS?  MSU’s research report on tomato spotted wilt on chrysanthemum.

Oh goody, another chrysanthemum disease that looks similar to TSWV!  This stem necrosis virus on chrysanthemum has only been seen in Korea so far.  Whew!

On the plant growth regulator front . .  Information from Joyce Latimer at Virginia Tech on why PGR labels aren’t specific by crop. And e-GRO’s PGR MixMaster app to help you calculate amounts. There are lots of other reports on PGR application research at e-GRO, too.

And in preparation for next year’s poinsettias – can you really start too soon thinking about them? – an article on biocontrol for poinsettia
And information on aerial blight on poinsettias – an uncommon disease caused by our unfortunately common friend Phytophthora (so common I was forced to learn to spell it correctly)  (remember to check NYSPAD for NYS labels of any pesticides)

Oh, just one more beast to keep an eye out for – and aphids are likely to pop up earlier in the spring than we like – the foxglove aphid. Getting to be much more common in greenhouses.

Well maybe another – broad mite in pepper.  Do you have gnarly looking leaves?  Look VERY closely for this pest.

Enough for this time!

Some lovely sunny days lately!  Have a great week!

July 12, 2016

Greenhouse IPM update 7.12.16

Too hot to think?  I hope not as there is lots of new stuff out there.  Turn up the fan and start reading!

New York State’s Pollinator Protection Plan is finished! It took a lot of people a lot of time to create.  What does it mean for you?  It has Best Management Practices for a lot of groups including Pesticide Users, Landowners/Growers, State Agencies, and Beekeepers. It includes funding for pollinator protection and IPM, invasive species prevention and eradication and farmland protection, research and outreach. Check it out!

What’s out there and coming?
Cucurbit downy mildew confirmed in Ontario, Canada  – and a new article from Meg McGrath (search for 2016 or scroll down to Cucurbit downy mildew)
Spotted wing drosophila all over NYS
Basil downy mildew – south and central NJ
Late blight on tomatoes – in Maryland
Impatiens downy mildew – in Maryland (maybe it is raining there)
I guess there is at least one advantage to drought.

Are they horror movies or tales of redemption?  You decide when you watch Koppert Biologicals’ videos of biocontrol agents eating pests.

Might you have mites?  At least some of them like hot weather.  I have them on my hops!  Griffin’s GGSPro has an article on two spotted spider mite.
And John Sanderson will be covering cyclamen and broad mites at the IPM In-depth (need a reminder?  There’s still time to sign up!)

Feeling stuffed up? Learn to unclog your drip emitters.

Have something to say?  EPA has a 60 day comment period on some pesticide registration language on combating pesticide resistance.  Find out more.

Need information on pest management for specialty crops like lavender?  OMAFRA has a blog for you.

What’s new in research?
Using far-red and blue light to reduce intumescence (edema) on tomato.

Using milk jugs, pest lures and a ‘stun pill’ to trap and kill cucumber beetles (not greenhouse but cool)-  (but what is the buffalo gourd powder in there for?)

Alabama has a new High tunnel I-book and it is free!  Granted New York isn’t Alabama but it might have some useful information and did I mention – FREE!

 

Have a wonderful week!

April 6, 2016

Greenhouse IPM update 4.6.16

A lovely tour of Rochester greenhouses last week.  I think I was having a color deficit reaction.  Need More Flowers!

It’s all in the tank! How do beneficial nematodes get along with pesticides as a tank mix?  Sarah Jandricic checked it out.

Beating botrytis – yes, it is that time of year.
The temperature and humidity range information is very helpful!

Keeping up with calibration – for EC and pH meters.  Note that not all are constructed the same way – but the basic information is a good reminder.  In fact, I need to calibrate mine today!

Need more encouragement to scout? And even more?

Do plants need sunscreen – when you use UV light to kill fungal diseases?

Grown in the USA – more beneficials are available from Beneficial Insectary in CA.

A little light reading – if you can find the time now.  The presentations from the 2015 Canadian Greenhouse Conference. My favorite slide title – The bios are @#&%$ !!! A checklist before complaining to your supplier.

Margery says she always reads these in case I mention her.  Maybe I should start adding other people’s names, too.

Have a great week!