Students share global and public health projects, solutions to problems

More than 40 student teams gathered Nov. 3 to present their experiences with global and public health learning as part of the Global and Public Health Experiential Learning Symposium, hosted by the Cornell Global Health Program and its Student Advisory Board. Held in Martha van Rensselaer Commons, the teams used…

Continue reading

Cornell’s recipe for public engagement

Marin Cherry, M.S. ’15, course coordinator for Food Science 4000, left, with Professor Chang “Cy” Lee, who teaches the class. Last spring, food science major Maddie Parish ’17 and other members of her team in the capstone course Food Science 4000 helped a food producer solve a critical production challenge:…

Continue reading

Unilever CEO argues for sustainable capitalism

Robert Barker/University Photography Unilever CEO Paul Polma speaks at the Robert S. Hatfield Fellow in Economic Education lecture with President Martha E. Pollack Oct. 12 in Alice Statler Auditorium. Can capitalism be sustainable, in more than one sense of the word? For Unilever CEO Paul Polman, the answer is a…

Continue reading

Satellite data paints a portrait of global plant health

Postdoctoral researcher Christine Yao-Yun Chang measures photosynthesis in a soy field near Musgrave Research Farm. When it comes to measuring photosynthesis, green is not all that counts. A Cornell researcher is using a NASA satellite to measure photosynthesis in high resolution at the global scale, advancing how we measure plant…

Continue reading

Teach Better podcast spotlights education innovation

Doug McKee “This Is Going to Be Big,” proclaimed Doug McKee’s Teach Better blog post on Feb. 13. The Cornell economics department had just received an Active Learning Initiative (ALI) grant to transform its entire undergraduate core curriculum over the next five years. It was the culmination of eight months…

Continue reading

Sea salts bring potentially harmful mold to the table, researchers find

Megan Biango-Daniels/CALS Several molds that were found in sea salt, including Aspergillus and Penicillium species. Like fine wines, sea salts are artisanal products that inspire talk of terroir, texture and provenance. Now there’s evidence that they can also be sources of spoilage molds. New research from Cornell mycologist Kathie Hodge…

Continue reading

Nicholas Kristof to give Bronfenbrenner Centennial Lecture Oct. 2

Nicholas Kristof Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Nicholas Kristof, a writer for The New York Times known for his work exposing social injustice, will speak on campus Monday, Oct. 2, at 5 p.m. in Call Auditorium. The event is free and open to the public. Kristof will deliver the Bronfenbrenner Centennial Lecture…

Continue reading

Today’s school failures have Reconstruction roots

Why are public schools failing? Why is school segregation higher than it’s been since the mid-20th century? To answer these questions, Noliwe Rooks followed the money. Her new book, “Cutting School: Privatization, Segregation, and the End of Public Education,” traces the financing of segregated education in America, beginning with Civil…

Continue reading

Cornell projects to cultivate digital agriculture landscape

Provided Jan Nyrop, director of Cornell University Agricultural Experiment Station (CUAES). Expanding on Cornell’s digital agriculture initiative, a slate of six projects totaling more than $1 million will generate innovative research in the intersecting fields of agriculture, computation and engineering. Research investment from the Cornell University Agricultural Experiment Station (CUAES)…

Continue reading

How best to say, ‘Keep out!’ 10,000 years into the future

Provided Team A design. Concept by Michael Brill, art by Safdar Abidi. Debates about nuclear energy rarely address an issue critical for future generations: how to warn them away from buried nuclear waste. The problem: In 10,000 years, society and language would have gone through profound changes. What words or symbols…

Continue reading