New York State IPM Program

February 21, 2020
by Debra E. Marvin
Comments Off on Dr. Jennifer Grant receives the New York State Turfgrass Association Citation of Merit

Dr. Jennifer Grant receives the New York State Turfgrass Association Citation of Merit

Verona, N.Y.

On Wednesday, February 12th, the New York State Turfgrass Association (NYSTA) Central Regional Conference provided the backdrop for a special recognition.

“NYSTA’s Citation of Merit award recognizes someone who is dedicated to turfgrass research and education, and promotes the careers of those in the turf industry. The New York State Turfgrass Association commends Jennifer for her leadership and service to the turfgrass industry and her valued commitment to environmental stewardship principles. Jennifer’s work secured the foundation of a nationally-respected IPM program. NYSTA is honored to include her in our prestigious group of Citation of Merit recipients.”

It’s clear that nominees have certainly earned the admiration and respect of their peers and colleagues. Those of us who work with her everyday couldn’t agree more.

photo of Betsy Lamb, Jennifer Grant and Steven Whipple during award ceremony

Dr. Betsy Lamb, Dr. Jennifer Grant, and NYSTA’s Vice President, Steven Whipple

NYSIPM’s own Dr. Betsy Lamb was able to announce and present the award. “I am pleased and honored to announce that the 2020 Citation of Merit is awarded to Jennifer Grant, my colleague and friend.”

Jen scouting for pests on turf

Here are some of the accolades:

Kevin Cassidy, New York State Director of Golf

“I first met Jennifer 20 years ago when she and Frank Rossi approached Bethpage State Park looking to apply their IPM research to a fully operational golf course. In 2010, what was learned initially through trial and error on Bethpage’s Green Course was expanded successfully to our entire golf operation statewide (19 facilities). I have witnessed firsthand Jennifer imparting her wisdom and passion to all of our facilities, reinforcing the fact that they can indeed provide top notch playing conditions, while doing it in an environmentally sustainable manner. I was thrilled to hear that Jen was being awarded the Citation of Merit by the NYSTA – what a well deserving recipient. Congratulations my friend!!”

Kyle Wickings, Associate Professor, Cornell Entomology

photo portrait of Dr. Kyle Wickings, Cornell Entomology

Dr. Kyle Wickings

“I have always been impressed by Jennifer’s perspective on the turfgrass industry.  Her knowledge of the needs and interests of our stakeholders and commitment to improving the sustainability of turf make for an excellent combination.  I continue to use this as a model when gauging the value of my lab’s research and extension programming.”

 

 

Julie Suarez, Associate Dean, Office of Governmental and Community Relations

Photo portrait of Julie Suarez, Governemnt Communcations Dean, Cornell

Julie Suarez

“Jennifer’s strength, grace, and great kindness are the traits I will miss the most.  I am, of course, impressed with her tremendous accomplishments in the field of IPM – the living turfgrass BMP’s, all her work with Bethpage and Parks on pollinator habitat – the list can be endless.  But what I will miss the most are the endearing personal qualities that she has always brought to her job – the steadfast commitment, perseverance, and ability to figure out how to just make things happen and frequently on a shoe string.”

Andy Wilson, Bethpage State Park Director of Agronomy

Jen and Andy Wilson during a golf course training

Jennifer and Andrew Wilson during a teaching event on Bethpage State Park Golf Course

“Jennifer’s diligence to not only Bethpage but New York State led us to be at the forefront of seeking solutions and experimenting with novel approaches to pest problems that reduce reliance on pesticides.  Those solutions and approaches sometimes do not work, which is part of the process.  Which makes me appreciate Jen’s patience.  As a golf course superintendent I can admit we are an impatient bunch.  Dr. Grant has dealt with some of our frustration and persisted in guiding us along a path where we are more thoughtful about how we maintain the golf course short and long term. When I first met Jennifer 20 years ago I did not realize how lucky I was to work with someone so talented.”

Dr. Frank Rossi, Associate Professor and Extension Turfgrass Specialist, Cornell University

Portrait of Frank Rossi

Dr. Frank Rossi

“In my thirty years of working around the world on progressive IPM, no single person has had greater impact on adoption of IPM principles that generally lead to reduced pesticide use than Dr. Jennifer Grant. She has lead industries throughout NY quietly but diligently toward principles of land management (beyond turf) that have made NY agriculture and communities among the most productive and environmentally responsible in the world.”

 

Photo shows Jen Grant kneeling to explain the use of a cup cutter to scout for grubs on turf as others watch

Scouting for pests–in this case grubs–is key to successful IPM, and IPM has always been the focus of Jen’s trainings.

April 23, 2015
by Joellen Lampman
Comments Off on Lawn IPM—Getting Ahead of the Weeds

Lawn IPM—Getting Ahead of the Weeds

“…winter, will be forced to relent, once again, to the new beginnings of soft greens, longer light, and the sweet air of spring.” – Madeleine M. Kunin

This turf along the edge of a walkway could use some help recovering after months of shoveled snow was piled on to it.p

This turf along the edge of a walkway could use some help recovering after months of shoveled snow was piled on top of it.

As spring progresses and temperatures continue to rise, lawns are recovering from the long winter. As the grass grows and the dry tips are mowed off, areas that need help will become more obvious. What can you do to help prevent weeds from taking over bare patches or thin areas? It’s time to break out the seed!

Mary Thurn from Cornell University guides us through the process of patching small weak or bare spots.

 

Want more? Download the free iBook, Lawn Care: The Easiest Steps to an Attractive Environmental Asset , also available on the Cornell Turfgrass website, and visit IPM for Landscapes, Parks & Golf Courses.

 

September 30, 2014
by Joellen Lampman
Comments Off on IPM for Dead Grass SOS

IPM for Dead Grass SOS

Grub damage is showing up in New York later this year than usual, so don’t let your guard down just because it’s October. Still, how do you know if it’s grubs — or something else? One test: if you can loosen the sod with a trowel or garden fork, then peel it up like a carpet, you’ve got grubs. Monitoring, though, is your best bet, and here’s how (pdf) — or watch this video.

Recently I visited distressed homeowners with a lawn so badly infested, I could brush the turf away with a swipe of my fingers. They didn’t want to use pesticides, but they also didn’t know the proper way — mow right, feed right, and water right — to care for their lawn. Given how sandy soil their soil was, their turf showed drought stress despite 2014’s rainy summer. And they had never fertilized.

Home lawn infested with grubs

Stressed grass is more likely to succumb to pests like white grub

My IPM recommendations:

  • Mow Right: Raise the height of cut on the mower to its highest level and sharpen the blades regularly.
  • Feed Right: Provide a fall nitrogen fertilizer application. Conduct a soil test to determine if other nutrients are also needed.
  • Water Right: Most grasses need one to two inches of water per week. When nature does not provide, it is important to provide supplemental water.

To tackle the grub issue, research at the State University of New York at Delhi has shown that turfgrass aerators can lower grub populations, sometimes as much as 90 percent. Aeration can also help better your success with overseeding. Beneficial nematodes are another, albeit more costly, choice for grub control.

Grub infested home lawn

Grubs had so badly damaged the roots that I could brush the grass away with my fingers.

While early fall is an excellent time to overseed with a drought-resistant turfgrass, when you have bare areas like this homeowner and have access to water, overseeding now will help get a jump on the weeds and help stabilize the soil. For these homeowners’ sandy, sunny location and their need for a low-maintenance lawn, Cornell recommends either a 100% tall fescue blend seeded at a rate of 7 to 10 pounds per 1,000 square feet — or a mixture of 65% fine fescue blend, 15% perennial ryegrasses, and 20% Kentucky bluegrass blend at 4 to 5 pounds per 1,000 square feet.

For more information, take a look at our Lawn Care Without Pesticides by Frank Rossi, Professor.

Skip to toolbar