New York State IPM Program

May 5, 2020
by Debra E. Marvin
Comments Off on Our 2018-2019 Annual Report: #4 Tick Management!

Our 2018-2019 Annual Report: #4 Tick Management!

Getting Schooled in Tick Management

photo shows a man at a tick workshop with a completed tick drag

(Above) Success! With his pants tucked into his socks, and having just assembled his own tick drag mat, workshop attendee Fred Koelbel has a right to feel accomplished. Thanks to the Long Island host district, Three Village—and our training—he’s now ready to reduce the incidence of tick bite risk in his own district.

Ticks are a problem everywhere, but schools are a special concern. We want kids to spend time outside playing sports and enjoying nature. But we want them to be safe too. Did you know that children aged five to nine years old have the highest incidence of Lyme disease? To help protect children at school, we developed a Tick Awareness and Management for Schools workshop that teaches school facilities staff how to assess and mitigate tick risks. Workshop lessons include tick biology and ecology, how to build a drag mat for detecting ticks, and time outside practicing tick survey methods. Managers learn how to reduce kids’ exposure to ticks, and involve teachers and students in the process. First piloted in Suffolk County, the workshop—now offered statewide—continues to improve with participant input.

Think ticks might be a problem on your school grounds? NYSIPM staff offer consultation ns and risk assessments to help schools determine if ticks are present and abundant. So far, 20 schools have been evaluated, and grounds managers discovered how they could reduce risk or limit areas accessible to kids and staff. School nurses and health educators also benefitted from training, thanks to the NYS Center for School Health Seminars that hosted Don’t Get Ticked NY! information booths.

Learning how to keep kids safe and avoid ticks is one lesson school professionals won’t want to miss.

photo shows the monitoring ticks poster

POSTER: How to Monitor for Ticks in Your School Yard.

Above: Show and tell. This poster and twelve more like it provide easy-to-understand guidance in the fight against tick-borne disease. Download, print and share. They’re just part of the extensive science-based, well-informed resources on our Don’t Get Ticked New York website, www.DontGetTickedNY.org.

Curious about habitat, repellants, monitoring for ticks, or minimizing risk? You should be. And don’t forget that daily tick check!

 

August 24, 2017
by Mary M. Woodsen
Comments Off on Getting ticked? Bummed about Lyme disease? You’re not alone

Getting ticked? Bummed about Lyme disease? You’re not alone

An NYS IPM Your NEWA Blog entry dropped into my inbox a couple of days ago — and since the entire conversation on my bus ride into work today was about ticks, a topic no one seemed to tire of, I just had to borrow from it for this post.

Here’s how it begins:

“Getting ticked? You’re not the only one.” That’s my colleague Dan Olmstead speaking. He continues:

“I was at Empire Farm Days working the New York State IPM Program booth last week. What do you think the most asked-about topic was?

“Every question I answered was about ticks. Ticks are most well-known as carriers of Lyme disease and they are on the rise. Changing weather and climate patterns could be partly to blame. Growing seasons are getting longer and ticks have more time to develop.”

Dan goes on to explain that range expansion is another likely factor coinciding with increasing numbers of mice and deer. These critters do well in fragmented habitat, whether it’s overgrown field, hedgerows — or expanding suburbs.

Mice infected with Lyme transmit it to the young ticks that feed on them. Meanwhile deer (birds too) pick up ticks in one place and ferry them to new, perhaps un-infested locations — making them complicit in transmitting Lyme disease despite the fact that, at least on deer, Lyme-free ticks (and yes, such ticks exist) won’t contract Lyme by feeding on deer.

But the black-legged tick (aka deer tick), host to Lyme disease and several other nasty co-infections, isn’t the only dog in the fight. It has friends — as it were. Here (courtesy the Centers for Disease Control) are the ticks we see and the most common diseases now associated with them:

Black-legged Ticks  Lyme, Anaplasmosis, Babesiosis and Powassan virus
Lone Star Ticks    Erlichiosis, STARI, and Tularemia
American Dog Ticks   Tularemia and Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever
Brown Dog Ticks Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever

When Empire Farm Days rolled around in early August, the tiny nymphs — the most dangerous stage for us humans — were still at it, still clambering onto the tall grasses and low brush or meadow plants that they’d perched on most every chance they got since May. They were waiting for the right host to come by. It’s called questing. And yes, these ticks are — metaphorically at least — on a quest that for them means life or death. (Most die but plenty remain.)

True, by now in late August, their populations have peaked. But even so they’re still eight-armed and dangerous.

Eight-armed? OK — make that eight-legged.

And typically by early August, it’s too hot and dry anyway for ticks to quest for hosts. But by early August this year, our colleague Joellen Lampman hadn’t seen the usual summer decline in black-legged tick questing. Ticks like to quest when humidity is greater than 85%, and 2017 assuredly hasn’t been stingy on that account.

Got ticks on your mind? Bummed because you’re stuck inside and feel like you can’t get out in the woods like you used to? Worried because deer have found your neighborhood, regardless how populated your neighborhood? Wondering how best to protect yourself? Seek no further: Tick Encounter is your one-stop shopping for everything you need to know. Check it out.

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