New York State IPM Program

For IPM, Looking Back Means Looking Ahead

2015 marks our 30th anniversary here at NYS IPM. With age comes a new approach to our Year in Review — to our annual report. Yes, as always our focus is real science for real people. But “commodity driven” has long been our organizing principle.

This year our Year in Review will be different — a difference that’s as new as tomorrow. No matter if you’re coping with rats in the furnace room or late blight in tomato fields large and small, most everything in IPM relates to something else in IPM. So our organizing principle this year? I’m calling it “A Theme Runs Through It.”

Yes, even viruses are pests. Plum pox first showed up in NY orchards in 2006.

Yes, even viruses are pests. Plum pox first showed up in NY orchards in 2006.

Our themes? Inasives are a biggie, so lets start there. Given the invasives and emerging pests we were seeing 30 years ago, could we foreseen the meteoric rise in bed bugs? Stick bugs? And not just insects, but new viruses, bacteria, weeds?

More themes? Pest forecasts — because if you know a problem is headed your way, it’s easier to take action to prevent or better cope with it. Applied research that spans years — because when you test new IPM tactics under a range of conditions year in and year out, you have a clearer picture of do they work and what should you tweak one year that you don’t need to the next. Education — because people learn with their hands as well as their heads. Nor is that all.

A single post of mums is a trap? Yes — a trap crop, attracting greenhouse pests that could wreak havoc with your main crop.

A single pot of mums is a trap? Trap crops attract greenhouse pests that could wreak havoc with your main crop.

Each theme offers incorporates core principles of IPM: Prevention. Monitoring. Meeting cultural needs. Natural enemies of pests — biocontrol, in a word. Lures and traps. Healthy soil. Healthy plants. Healthy homes and schools — healthy kids. They apply across the board.

Oh — and by culture, no; we don’t mean a night at the opera. (Or even the pool hall). We mean finding the right site, whether indoors or out, with the right conditions for the plants you want to grow.

We’ll have more. Stay tuned.

Author: Mary M. Woodsen

Pests and pesticides — both can cause harm. How can we protect ourselves the least-toxic way? IPM is the sound, sensible, science-based approach that works wherever you do. The New York State Integrated Pest Management Program develops and offers tested tactics for pests new and old, whether on farms, offices, orchards, schools, parks, vineyards, more.... Wherever you find pests, you find IPM.

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