New York State IPM Program

IPM: Pests, Best Practices, and the Passage of Time

January — that’s when the long process of combing through this year’s crop of NYS IPM research reports begins. We’re looking for great stories to feature in our annual report. As usual, we’ve got lots of contenders. And would that we had room for them all.

Beneficials are a big deal now in IPM. This hover fly pollinates crops — but it’s the larvae that do the dirty work on aphids and more. Photo provided.

Beneficials are a big deal now in IPM. This hover fly pollinates crops — but it’s the larvae that do the dirty work. Photo provided.

Our theme this year? Well, it is our 30th anniversary. So we’re taking a “then and now” approach that highlights the changes we’ve seen in IPM practices — and predicaments — over time. The “IPM practices” part? Let’s call them best practices. They’re generally the result of years of focused diligence; of continually fine-tuning tactics, incorporating technology breakthroughs, and building partnerships around the state, the Northeast, and the nation.

As for those “IPM predicaments” — well, just think “bed bug.” Who knew, 30 years ago, that bed bugs were waiting in the wings for their place in the spotlight? Consider them a symbol of sorts — a critter that stands for the ever-increasing numbers of invasive species now infiltrating our homes, our gardens, our farms and forests.

If anything proves the value of IPM not just to farmers, not just to practitioners, but to all of us, it’s our response to a sweeping range of pest problems new and old. Stay tuned.

Meanwhile, for closer look at our recent IPM research, check out our previous annual reports.

Author: Mary M. Woodsen

Pests and pesticides — both can cause harm. How can we protect ourselves the least-toxic way? IPM is the sound, sensible, science-based approach that works wherever you do. The New York State Integrated Pest Management Program develops and offers tested tactics for pests new and old, whether on farms, offices, orchards, schools, parks, vineyards, more.... Wherever you find pests, you find IPM.

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