Ishani Mukherjee Receives World Future Foundation PhD Award

Ishani

On July 10, 2014 at the National University of Singapore, Ishani Mukherjee received the World Future Foundation PhD Prize, a $10,000 award in Environmental & Sustainable Research.  Ishani did her B.S. (2004) in the Department of Natural Resources and was a M.S. (2006) student with Dr. James Lassoie.  For more details concerning Ishani’s award, see:  http://lkyspp.nus.edu.sg/news/ishani-mukherjee-receives-world-future-foundation-phd-prize-in-environmental-sustainability-research/.

Congratulations, Ishani!!

JAMES LASSOIE Awarded IP-CALS Innovative Teaching Grant

James LassoieJim Lassoie is the recipient of the Innovative Teaching in International Agriculture and Rural Development Grant by International Programs, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences.  This $3000 award will be used to fund the logistical and curriculum development of a three week service trip to Ecuador.  This trip is offered as a part of IARD/LATA 4011/6011 “Experience Latin America – Ecuador Edition I/II”, a two-course sequence, fall and spring semesters, 3 credits each.  For more details concerning this award and “Experience Latin America – Ecuador Edition I/II”, see http://blogs.cornell.edu/ipcals/2014/08/05/james-lassoie-is-awarded-ip-cals-innovative-teaching-grant/

Congratulations, Jim!

PAUL CURTIS Collaborates with Newark Valley 6th Grade Students

On May 12th, Paul Curtis received thanks from Jessica Williams, 6th Grade Teacher at Newark Valley Central School, for his collaboration with three 6th grade boys and recognition in the following article she submitted to the local Newark Valley newspaper:

Congratulations to 6th graders Collin Creeley, Riley Malone and Joshua Post!  The boys placed 1st at the State level in a National science competition’s 6th grade division. eCYBERMISSION is a web-based Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics competition for 6th, 7th, 8th and 9th grade teams. Each team proposes a solution to a real problem in their community and then competes for State, Regional and National Awards.  This type of ‘real world’ problem solving challenges students to explore how Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics work in the world.

Collin, Riley and Josh chose to explore the deliberate extermination of coyotes as these animals move into suburban and even urban areas of New York.  The boys hypothesized that the killing of these animals was done out of ignorance and fear.  They designed an experiment in which they measured children’s feelings of fear and tendency toward acts of violence against coyotes and then educated these same children about the animals in general.  After the intervention (the education about coyotes) they found that students’ feels of fear and tendency toward aggressive behavior against the animals significantly dropped.  This has interesting implications for wildlife management but also has broader reaching implications for human behavior in general.

In addition to a tremendous amount of reading related to the coyote population and what impact their deliberate extermination has on the eco-system, the boys also collaborated with internationally renowned coyote expert, Paul D. Curtis.  Dr. Curtis serves as Extension Wildlife Specialist in the Department of Natural Resources at Cornell University. His applied research and extension programs have focused on reducing human-wildlife conflicts in agricultural and suburban landscapes. His work includes community-based wildlife management issues and public policy education. Dr. Curtis was a tremendous asset to our students and was a wonderfully supportive and encouraging guide and the students were so grateful for his input.  The boys engaged in skype meetings with Dr. Curtis and communicated with him via email.

All three boys have received college scholarships for their 1st place win and are thrilled with their accomplishment. 

http://cornellcals.tumblr.com/post/92149047299/coyote-pretty