August 30, 2013

NYS IPM Weekly Field Crops Pest Report, August 30th



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In this issue:

  1. View from the Field
  2. Weather Outlook
  3. Western Bean Cutworm Update
  4. Growing Degree Days
  5. Clipboard Checklist


View from the Field

There are reports of soybean aphids close to threshold numbers in soybeans in New York. While fields were close to the 250 aphid per plant threshold at the R6 stage of soybean development there is no economic benefit to spraying the beans with an insecticide. Many extension educators have consulted growers not to spray because the fields were reaching this R6 stage. Many growers were able to avoid spraying for the aphids.

While scouting the Cornell Research Farm this week a new seeding of alfalfa was over threshold for potato leafhopper. Most of the leafhoppers were nymphs. The new alfalfa seeding is not within a week to 10 days from harvest. This field will need to be treated with an insecticide.   In the established alfalfa fields potato leafhoppers were not at threshold.

Justin O’Dea (CCE Ulster County) reports finding bacterial pustule and downy mildew in a few soybean fields. Bacterial pustule was at very high levels and was on very plant in the upper canopy.  He also reports finding presence of low amounts of northern corn leaf blight and gray leaf spot in field corn.

Mike Stanyard (Northwest Field Crops and Dairy Team) reports finding bean leaf beetle (Seneca County) and spider mites in soybeans at below economic thresholds. He also reports finding northern corn blight in corn and white mold in soybeans.

Jeff Miller (CCE Oneida County) reports finding northern corn leaf blight and northern corn leaf spot in corn.

At an organic pasture fly meeting on Thursday August 29 in Essex County on the Essex Organic farm horn fly numbers on dairy cattle were very high. They had 300 to 500 flies on each animal. There were threshold numbers of stable flies on the cattle as well as face flies.

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Weather Outlook – August 29, 2013

NOAA Northeast Regional Climate Center, Cornell University

Last week’s temperatures ranged from 0 to 3 degrees above.  Precipitation ranged from a trace to 2”.  The base 50 growing degree-days ranged from 100-150 for most areas, with below 100 in the Adirondack region.

Thursday and Friday will be dry for most areas.  Saturday through Tuesday will bring unsettled weather with scattered thunderstorms. Today will be partly sunny with highs in the low to mid 80’s.  Some scattered thunderstorms are possible this afternoon and evening in eastern areas. Overnight temperatures will be in the upper 50’s and low 60’s. Friday will be mostly sunny with temperatures in the low to mid 80’s.  Most of the state should be dry but some afternoon thunderstorms can’t be ruled out. Overnight lows will be in the low to mid 60’s. Saturday will be partly cloudy with highs in the low to mid 80’s.  There is a chance of scattered showers and thunderstorms as a surface low moves through.  Saturday night will be in the mid 60’s. Sunday will be partly cloudy with highs in the lower 80’s with scattered showers and thunderstorms.   Overnight temperatures will be in the mid 60’s. Labor Day will be mostly cloudy and cooler, with highs in the mid to upper 70’s and with a chance of showers and thunderstorms.  Lows will be in the mid to upper 50’s. Tuesday will cloudy and cooler yet with temperatures in the upper 60’s and low 70’s.  Lows will be in the upper 50’s and 60’s. Wednesday temperatures will be in the low to mid 70’s.  Lows will be in throughout the 50’s.

The five-day precipitation amounts will range from ¾” to 2.5”.

The 8-14 day outlook (Sep 5 – 11) is showing below normal temperatures and normal precipitation.

Maps of 8-14 day outlooks

National Weather Service watch/warning map

NRCC Drought Page which features the US Drought Monitor map

(updated every Thursday)

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Western Bean Cutworm Update (8.18.13 – 8.24.13)

Keith Waldron, NYS IPM

Western Bean Cutworm moth numbers dropped off again last week.  WBC catches for the week 8.18.13 – 8.24.13 ranged from 0 to 11 with an average of 1.44 WBC moths per trap caught in the 55 traps* reporting this week. *NYS 2013 Field Crop, Dry Bean and Sweet Corn Monitoring Network Data combined. No reports of WBC larvae or damage reported this week.

Monitoring for WBC larvae and signs of feeding in corn ears and dry bean pods should continue. Larvae could be expected to be found in corn ear tips and boring into other areas of the ear within about 10 days after hatch. Western Bean cutworm larvae are tolerant of their siblings… so you may find more than one WBC larvae per ear.

Western Bean Cutworm Trap Catch by County – Week of 8.18.13 – 8.24.13.

County City 7/28/13 8/4/13 8/11/13 8/18/13 Accum.Total
Allegany Belmont

1

0

28

Allegany Fillmore

2

0

61

Cattaraugus Randolph

7

Cayuga Auburn

0

Cayuga Aurora

6

3

2

0

26

Cayuga* King Ferry

1

0

8

Chautauqua* Kennedy

4

1

0

0

18

Clinton Chazy

30

23

4

57

Clinton Peru

21

17

6

74

Columbia Valatie

0

1

1

4

Cortland

5

13

Cortland* Preble

5

2

11

Delaware Walton

0

0

0

5

Delaware W. Davenport

2

1

0

18

Dutchess Millbrook

2

0

0

4

Erie* Eden

0

0

NA

0

15

Essex Westport

3

9

Essex Willsboro

38

13

2

57

Franklin Malone

71

62

19

5

367

Franklin Malone

237

156

22

8

514

Franklin Malone

18

6

0

39

Genesee Alexander

35

10

5

3

61

Genesee Stafford

8

5

0

29

Genesee* Batavia

8

5

2

1

30

Genesee* LeRoy

11

24

5

1

49

Jefferson Calcium

296

88

21

592

Jefferson Ellisburg

80

29

6

253

Jefferson Evans Mills

53

42

5

138

Jefferson Hounsfield

39

9

1

83

Jefferson Plessis

79

46

11

3

164

Jefferson SackettsHarbor

298

111

42

11

853

Jefferson* Plessis

79

46

11

3

165

Lewis Martinsburg

124

92

20

6

308

Livingston Groveland

18

21

1

52

Livingston S Caledonia

25

12

0

62

Livingston SW Caledonia

4

2

0

12

Livingston* Avon

16

4

4

0

40

Madison* Kirkville

3

5

0

0

12

Monroe Spencerport

33

12

0

108

Monroe* Hamlin

7

6

5

0

27

Monroe* Spencerport

4

0

3

0

13

Montgomery Palatine Bridge

17

Niagara Atwater

119

67

26

3

275

Niagara Millville

0

0

0

0

3

Niagra* Lockport

3

0

0

0

3

Oneida Clinton

3

3

8

Onondaga Tully

0

0

0

0

3

Onondaga* Baldwinsville

10

3

0

0

33

Ontario Geneva

9

7

9

0

38

Ontario* Farmington

1

0

0

0

5

Orleans* Waterport

8

3

0

3

26

Oswego

0

Oswego* Oswego

0

0

55

Rensselaer Brunswick

0

0

Schuyler Valois

27

13

1

0

64

Seneca Waterloo

1

1

0

0

4

Seneca* Interlaken

20

7

2

0

47

St.Lawrence Madrid

27

1

0

68

Steuben Wayland

26

10

0

58

Steuben

5

4

19

Steuben* Avoca

0

3

0

9

Suffolk Riverhead

0

0

Tioga* Owego

0

1

0

6

Tompkins Varna

12

8

0

59

Ulster Accord

0

0

0

Ulster New Paltz

0

2

Washington Hudson Falls

0

1

4

Wayne Macedon

2

0

0

0

2

Wayne Penfield

0

1

0

2

Wayne* Williamson

27

13

21

16

100

Wyoming Attica

75

18

5

160

Wyoming Wyoming

33

29

3

102

Yates Benton

5

1

1

0

9

Yates* Bellona

51

5

0

126

Yates* Penn Yan

18

6

1

0

44

Weekly

Total

2111

1061

286

79

5737

*Sweet Corn Pheromone Trapping Network. **Dry Bean Site

 

Week

Total

Traps

Avg WBC / Trap

6/30/13

6

56

0.14

7/7/13

68

59

1.36

7/14/13

419

67

6.91

7/21/13

1353

68

23.25

7/28/13

1835

60

35.18

8/4/13

936

63

17.11

8/11/13

223

48

6.09

8/18/13

55

55

1.44

Season Total

5737

77

Additional WBC Trap Count Data can be found at the Sweet Corn Pheromone Trap Network Report.
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Current Growing Degree Days in NYS

March 1 – August 29, 2013  

                        Base 50 F   

Chazy              1936

Geneva            2039

Highland         2363

Ithaca              2029

Versailles        2013

Watertown      1882

NEWA Growing Degree Days

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Clipboard Checklist

Keith Waldron, NYS IPM

General

*Walk fields to check general field condition, weed issues, areas of soil erosion, ponding

Alfalfa:
*Evaluate established legume stands for approximate days till harvest
*Monitor alfalfa regrowth for potato leafhopper (PLH)
*Monitor new seedings for PLH, Pythium blight and Phytopthora Rot.

Corn:
*
Conduct late-season corn pests including European corn borer, foliar diseases such as northern corn leaf blight, gray leaf spot, eyespot, ear mold, weed issues, vertebrate damage
*Be on the lookout for possible larval feeding by Western Bean Cutworm in corn ears (and dry bean pods)

Soybeans:
*
Conduct late-season soybean pests such as soybean aphid, white mold, soybean vein necrosis virus and other diseases, weed issues, vertebrate damage
*Monitor for late season infestations of Brown Marmorated Stink Bug around field margins

Pastures:
*
Check and mend fences as needed.
*Check crop growth
*Monitor for invasive species, plants harmful to livestock
*Review/Plan rotation system

Equipment:
*Check and prepare equipment for upcoming harvests
*Maintain pesticide use records

Storage:
* Check stored grain bins for temperature, moisture and signs of mold and insects. Aerate, core, transfer grain or treat as necessary
*
Check forage allocation and anticipate feed program adjustments as forages from previous year are used up
*Plan where forages should be stored for optimum allocation next feeding season
*Mow around storage bins and facility to minimize harborage and pest hiding places

Dairy Cattle Barn Fly Management:
*Monitor animals and barn area for house fly, stable fly and other pest management needs including presence of rodents and birds.
*Check facilities for favorable fly breeding conditions: (organic matter + moisture): leaks in watering systems, roof gutters for leaks and potential overspill, drainage,
*Sanitation, sanitation, sanitation – clean animal resting areas, feed troughs, minimize source of moist organic matter i.e. fly breeding areas in barn and in adjacent animal loafing yard
* Continue fly monitoring: install “3X5″ index card fly speck monitoring cards throughout barn
*Use, replenish, replace fly management materials: sticky fly tapes/ribbons, insecticide baits, natural enemies (parasitoids), fly population monitoring (3 x 5) spot cards
*Consider purchase and release of Muscidifurax raptor and/or M. raptorellus, natural enemies of house and stable fly pupae.

Dairy Cattle on Pasture:
*Monitor animals for presence of face flies, horn flies and stable flies. Action guidelines: face flies (average 10 per animal face), horn flies (average 50 / dairy per animal side, 200 / beef cattle per animal side), stable flies average 10 per animal (all four legs)
*Check feed bunk / water source locations for signs of stable fly breeding (moist undisturbed organic matter – spilled feed, round bales, etc.), minimize source of moist organic matter i.e. fly breeding areas in barn and in adjacent animal exercise yard.
*Check pasture for forage quality / quantity, rotate as appropriate
*Check pasture for vegetation poisonous to livestock
*Consider use of pasture fly traps to help reduce deer, horse and stable fly populations

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