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Vineyard Geomatics seminar

If you missed this week’s department seminar, New adventures in vineyard geomatics with Andy Reynolds, Professor of Viticulture, Cool Climate Oenology & Viticulture Institute, Brock University, it’s now available online.

Soils for the Urban Eden: New course, Spring 2013

urban eden soils courseSoils for the Urban Eden
Hort/CSS 4930
More info: amp4@cornell.edu

  • 2 credits
  • Meets first 7 weeks of the semester
  • Tuesdays and Thursdays
  • Lecture: 1:25-2:15
    Lab: 2:30-4:25
  • Prerequisites:
    Hort/LA 4910 and 4920 or
    CSS 2600
  • Instructors: Marty Petrovic, Jonathan Russell-Anelli, Nina Bassuk, other guest lecturers

Topics:

  • Understanding urban soils:  What are urban soils? How do they differ for conventional soils? Properties of urban soils. Variation in urban soil properties.
  • Challenges of growing plants in the urban environment: poor soil health.
  • Managing soils for high use urban areas.
  • Managing contaminated urban soils.
  • Constructed soils for urban plantings and container plants.
  • Sustainable urban storm water systems including green roofs, constructed biofilters and rain gardens.
  • Soil remediation and soil modification.

Students create ‘greeter’ at Cornell Plantations

7-foot-tall ‘greeter’ outside the Nevin Welcome Center at Cornell Plantations

7-foot-tall ‘greeter’ outside the Nevin Welcome Center at Cornell Plantations

Eight students in the Art of Horticulture (HORT 2010) fashioned a 7-foot-tall ‘greeter’ outside the Nevin Welcome Center at Cornell Plantations. They wove and lashed the sculpture out of grapevines and contorted willow and dogwood branches.

“The students were inspired by the location and the challenge of making a human form,” says Bryan Emmett, MS/PhD student in the Department of Horticulture and the teaching assistant for the course. “They were truly collaborative, with the form developing as they progressed. The contorted willow — which forms the skirt — really spoke to them, and provided a foundation from which they crafted the form.”

“You have to see it to appreciate it,” says Marcia Eames-Sheavly, senior lecturer in the Department of Horticulture and the course’s instructor. “It’s towering. And when you’re not looking at it straight on, it seems to be dancing and bowing to greet the visitors.”

Materials were collected from the winter garden at Cornell Plantations and from the Cornell Grounds Department. “Special thanks go to Mary Hirshfeld, Irene Lekstutis, and Teddy Bucien at Cornell Plantations and Kevin McGraw at Cornell Grounds for providing the commission and facilitating our collection of materials,” says Emmett.

View more images of the classes activities on the Art of Horticulture’s Picasa site.

Art of Horticulture students with their woven branch greeter

Art of Horticulture students with their woven branch greeter

The Wine Major (video)

Cornell viticulture and enology major Chelsea Gallup shares her expertise and experience in the program. From Ithaca College’s Buzzsaw Magazine.

The Wine Major from Buzzsaw Magazine on Vimeo.

Dilmun Hill videos

Dilmun Hill — Cornell’s student-run organic farm — was recently featured in a Cornell Daily Sun video:

It was also the subject of two student videos (here and here) following a visit from the HORT 1101 (Horticultural Science and Systems) class:

In the news

Senior extension associate Tim Martinson helps growers and wineries in the Finger Lakes region cope with variable weather. Robyn Wishna/University Photography.

Senior extension associate Tim Martinson helps growers and wineries in the Finger Lakes region cope with variable weather. Robyn Wishna/University Photography.

Unusual season to yield exceptional Finger Lakes wines [Cornell Chronicle 10/1/2012] – This year’s weather threw several curve balls to New York grape growers. But while the crop may be smaller than some years, it is expected to be big on flavor. Senior extension associate Tim Martinson says the hot, dry weather produced grapes that will make excellent wine.

Mazourek brings organic plant breeding to N.Y. growers [Cornell Chronicle 10/1/2012] – Michael Mazourek, Calvin Noyes Keeney Assistant Professor of Plant Breeding, earned recognition by the Organic Seed Alliance (OSA) this month as it marked the 150th anniversary of the land-grant university system with a series of profiles on young organic breeders.

Incarcerated teens cultivate veggies, confidence, responsibility [Cornell Chronicle 9/27/2012] – Many of the young men at the Finger Lakes Residential Center (FLRC) in Lansing, N.Y., got to work each week in a garden supported in part by Cornell Cooperative Extension (CCE). They learned gardening skills in the classroom and through hands-on learning experiences since May. The program also serves as a pilot to encourage other facilities around the state to implement similar programs.

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