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Youth Grow Summit cultivates food system activists

Youth Grow logo70 high school students from across New York attended three days of workshops on leadership training, community organizing, food justice, gardening and farming methods, youth empowerment, seasonal cooking, school food, food system education, nutrition and health as well as hands-on gardening activism at the first Youth Grow Summit hosted June 28-30 by the Department of Horticulture’s Garden-Based Learning Program in partnership with Cornell Cooperative Extension’s 4-H Career Explorations Conference.

“Our goal is to provide youth with the leadership skills, guidance and inspiration needed to build sustainable community food systems,” said Christine Hadekel, the Youth Grow coordinator at the Garden-Based Learning Program.

Read Cornell Chronicle article.

Youth Grow participants learn about small-scale farming at work session at Dilmun Hill, Cornell's student farm.

Youth Grow participants learn about small-scale farming at work session at Dilmun Hill, Cornell's student farm.

USDA funds $4.7 million for climate research

David WolfeFrom a July 5 Cornell Chronicle article, $4.7 million USDA grant will help corn farmers reduce greenhouse gas output:

“The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has awarded $4.7 million to a Cornell-led effort to help corn growers reduce their carbon footprint and improve net profits by better managing greenhouse gas emissions, soil carbon and nitrogen fertilizer use.

David Wolfe (right), professor of horticulture, is principal investigator for the five-year project, which includes collaborators from Cornell, Columbia University and Colorado State University. The project began in April and focuses on corn farming in New York, Iowa and Colorado. …

“‘It’s all about keeping farmers in business in a world where energy costs and the climate are uncertain,’ Wolfe said. ‘Farmers and policymakers will need new decision tools to maintain food security and farm profits while also reducing greenhouse gas emissions.'”

Read the whole article.

Dean Boor on Extension’s ‘One Great Idea’

Cornell Cooperative Extension celebrates its centennial this year.

Cornell Cooperative Extension celebrates its centennial this year.

Kathryn Boor, the Ronald P. Lynch Dean of Agriculture and Life Sciences, delivered the first in a series of lectures sponsored by Cornell Cooperative Extension to celebrate its centennial. Boor’s lecture focused on the importance of science in everyday life and CCE’s role in engaging people of all ages.

“When science is applied to the situations that we encounter in everyday life, we have a framework from which to make observations and to implement changes that ultimately will lead to novel solutions to improve human lives,” Boor said. “When we are engaged as a society in the application of scientifically derived knowledge, the benefit is magnified.”

Read Cornell Chronicle article.

View video.

Late blight on Long Island

Late blight lesion on tomato leaf.  Click for larger view.

Late blight lesion on tomato leaf. Click for larger view.

From Meg McGrath, Long Island Horticultural Research & Extension Center.

“Concern that rainy weather this spring would provide favorable conditions for late blight has unfortunately turned to reality. This devastating disease has just been confirmed on on five different farms on the South Fork of Long Island, and on potatoes in Virginia and Delaware. Researchers involved with a national project on this disease are studying the outbreaks. Greater understanding of the source of the pathogen responsible for these outbreaks will lead to better prediction and management in the future. Reports and samples are needed from gardeners as well as farmers who have late blight.”

Visit Late Blight Alert for updates on outbreaks and links to other resources.

See also McGrath’s photo galleries of late blight on tomatoes and potatoes for image to help identify late blight and other resources.

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