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Equipment for Small-Scale Vegetable Operations

planterFrom Organic Farming Coordinator Melissa Madden, info about an upcoming event at the Homer C. Thompson Vegetable Research Farm in Freeville:

Equipment for Small-Scale Vegetable Operations
Getting maximum efficiency and increasing yields with practical tools for organic and small-scale growers

Thursday, Aug. 5, 2010 — rain or shine
4 to 7 p.m.
Freeville, N.Y. (Tompkins Co.)

Organic vegetable research at Cornell means lots of equipment in one place! Come and see demonstrations of specialized equipment appropriate for small scale production. Some equipment is available for growers to borrow and experiment with on their own farms (contact info provided at the field day).

Please join us for these demonstrations:

  • Weed management and ridge-till systems
  • Plant breeding, selection and seed saving
  • Potato variety trials and harvest equipment
  • Reduced tillage and mulch moving systems

This event is free and open to the public
Refreshments provided

Contact Melissa Madden at (607) 351 3313 or email mam233@cornell.edu

Directions:

Homer C. Thompson Vegetable Research Farm
133 Fall Creek Rd., Freeville, NY 13068.
Google map.

  • From the Cornell campus-Ithaca, follow Rt. 366 to Freeville and go straight through the 4-way stop to the farm about 1 mile beyond Freeville. Turn left at Ed Hill Road and take a right onto the farm lane out to the organic research farm (signs provided).
  • From Syracuse: follow 81 South for 28 miles and exit onto Main Street. Turn left at 281 South/west. Turn right at County Rd. 34B/McLean Rd. Continue on County Rd. 105/McLean Rd for 5.5 miles, and turn right on Ed Hill Rd. Take the right onto the farm lane to go out to the organic research farm (signs provided).
  • From Binghamton: follow 81 North and take Exit 9. Turn left at NY 221 S, and then an immediate right onto US 11 N. Turn left at NY 392, and turn right at North St. Take the third left onto NY 38/Freeville Rd. Continue on Herman Rd. Turn right at 105/Fall Creek Rd., and turn right on Ed Hill Rd. Take the right onto the farm lane to go out to the organic research farm (signs provided).

Check us out at http://www.cuaes.cornell.edu/cals/cuaes/ag-operations/freeville-farm/

Late blight webinar

Late blight lesion on tomato leaf.  (Meg McGrath photo)

Late blight lesion on tomato leaf. (Meg McGrath photo)

Understanding and managing Late blight of tomato and potato in the home garden

  • A webinar presented by Cornell, Rutgers and Penn State Universities
  • Tuesday July 13, 2010
  • 6:30 to 8:30 p.m.

Go to Elluminate webinar site.

Webinar chat room will open at approximately 6:15 p.m.

To make sure that your computer is configured properly prior to the webinar, visit: www.elluminate.com/support

Pest alert: Leek moth

Leaf moth larva (caterpillar) on garlic leaf.  Photo by Amy Ivy.

Leaf moth larva (caterpillar) on garlic leaf. Photo by Amy Ivy.

A new insect pest of onions, leeks, garlic and related alliums is making its way into New York.

The leek moth (Acrolepiopsis assectella) has been confirmed by Cornell entomologist Rick Hoebeke (Cornell) to be in St. Lawrence and Clinton Counties, and is now suspected in Jefferson County as well as in Vermont.

This pest is found in most of Europe and many other areas including Japan, Siberia, Algeria. It was first found in North America in Quebec in 1997 and was first confirmed in the continental U.S. last summer in four home gardens in Plattsburg.

Leek moths have become particularly troublesome to small-scale, organic growers in eastern Ontario and to commercial producers in western Quebec, who have limited insecticide options, according to Hannah Fraser, an entomologist from Ontario, Canada. There are currently no insecticides that can be legally applied to control this pest in New York.

For more information on pest biology, identification and crop damage, Cornell entomologists recommend the factsheet Leek Moth – A Pest of Allium Crops from the Ontario Ministry of Agriculture Food and Rural Affairs.

Adapted from factsheet by Cornell entomologists Tony Shelton and Brian Nault.

'Window paning' in onions (left) and damage to garlic leaves (right).  Photos by Amy Ivy.

'Window paning' in onions (left) and damage to garlic leaves (right). Photos by Amy Ivy.

Buy produce from Dilmun Hill Student Farm

Dilmun Hill farm stand outside Mann Library on the Ag QuadThe Dilmun Hill farm stand is open for the season!

Look for the stand outside Mann Library every Tuesday from 2:30 – 5:30 p.m. through the growing season. (Rain location: Mann Library Lobby.)

Our student farmers are selling picked-that-morning vegetables. Also available are fresh mushrooms and potted plants from the MacDaniels Nut Grove and Dilmun-inspired art.

Dilmun Hill is Cornell’s student-managed organic farm. To get involved or find out more information about programs and activities, visit the Dilmun Hill website or email email dilmunhill@cornell.edu.

View Dilmun Hill video:

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