USDA to Survey County Small Grains Acreage and Production

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) will survey producers throughout the U.S. as part of its County Agricultural Production Survey (CAPS). The survey will collect information on total acres planted and harvested, and total yield and production of small grains down to the county level.

“The data provided by producers will help Federal and State programs support the farmer,” said Kevin Pautler, deputy director of the NASS Northeastern Regional Field Office. “We hope every producer will take the time to respond if they receive this survey. Producers benefit when there are data available to help determine accurate loan rates, disaster payments, crop insurance price elections, and more. When enough producers respond to surveys, NASS is able to publish data. Without data, agencies such as USDA’s Risk Management Agency or Farm Service Agency may not have information on which to base the programs that serve those same producers.”

Within the next few weeks NASS representatives will contact selected growers to arrange telephone interviews to complete the survey.

NASS safeguards the privacy of all respondents and publishes only aggregate data, ensuring that no individual operation or producer can be identified.

Survey results will be published on the NASS Quick Stats database at https://quickstats.nass.usda.gov. For more information, please call the NASS Northeastern Regional Field Office at (800) 498-1518.

New restricted use insecticide registered for aphids on soybean

Contributed by Mike Helms, Pesticide Management Education Program

The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) recently approved the registration of three insecticides containing the active ingredient afidopyrofen. These are the first products registered in New York State containing this active ingredient. Products registered include:

  • Sefina Inscalis Insecticide (EPA Reg. No. 7969-391) – registered for use on several agricultural crops including cucurbits, fruiting vegetables, tuberous and corm vegetables and soybean against various aphids and whiteflies.
  • Versys Inscalis Insecticide (EPA Reg. No. 7969-389) – registered for use on brassicas, leaf petiole and leafy vegetables, pome fruit, and stone fruit against various aphids and whiteflies.
  • Ventigra Insecticide (EPA Reg. No. 7969-393) – registered for use on ornamentals and vegetable transplants against aphids, whiteflies, mealybugs, and scale.

Note that all three of these products are restricted-use in New York State and their use in Nassau and Suffolk Counties are prohibited. The labels for these products also have NY-specific buffer zone requirements.

Copies of the approved labels for these products are available from the NYSDEC’s product registration website.

Questions should be directed to Cornell PMEP.

Weather Outlook – July 9, 2020

Contributed by NOAA Northeast Regional Climate Center, Cornell University

Last week temperatures ranged from 2 degrees below normal to 4 degrees above normal. Precipitation has ranged from a trace to 2 inches. Base 50 growing degree-days ranged from 110-190.

GDD Base 48 Mar 1 - July 8 GDD Base 48 May 1 - July 8 GDD Base 50 Mar 1 - July 8 GDD Base 50 May 1 - July 8

Today will be hot & humid with temperatures in the mid 80s to mid 90s and isolated showers and thunderstorms; some storms will be capable of producing heavy downpours. Overnight lows will be in mid 60s to mid 70s.

Friday will be another hot & humid day with temperatures in the 90s. A coastal low will bring cloud cover and increased chances for showers and thunderstorms, most likely for eastern areas. There is a risk for flash flooding. Overnight temperatures will be in the 70s.

Saturday temperatures will be in the 80s. Some areas will have morning rain continuing from Friday night and more widespread afternoon showers and thunderstorms are likely. Overnight temperatures will be in the mid to upper 60s.

Sunday will have afternoon showers and thunderstorms, with highs in the mid low to 80s. Overnight temperatures will be in the mid to upper 60s.

Monday temperatures will be in the low 80s with scattered thunderstorms. Overnight temperatures will be in the mid to upper 60s.

Tuesday highs will be in the 80 with scattered afternoon showers and thunderstorms. Overnight temperatures will be in the mid to upper 60s.

Wednesday highs will be in the mid 80s to low 90s. Overnight temperatures will be in the mid to upper 60s.

The seven-day precipitation amounts will range from half an inch to two and a half inches.

The 8-14 day outlook (July 16-22) favors above-normal temperatures with high probability. The precipitation outlook favors near- to slightly below-normal amounts.

Maps of 8-14 day outlooks:
http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/predictions/814day/index.php

National Weather Service watch/warnings map:
http://www.weather.gov/erh/

US Drought Monitor
http://droughtmonitor.unl.edu/

CLIMOD2 (NRCC data interface):
http://climodtest.nrcc.cornell.edu

Weather Outlook – July 2, 2020

Contributed by NOAA Northeast Regional Climate Center, Cornell University

Last week temperatures ranged from 2 degrees below normal to 4 degrees above normal. Precipitation has ranged from a trace to over 3 inches. Base 50 growing degree-days ranged from 80 to 160.

GDD Base 48 March 1 - July 1 GDD Base 48 May 1 - July 1 GDD Base 50 March 1 - July 1 GDD Base 50 May 1 - July 1

Today temperatures will be in the mid 80s to low 90s with afternoon showers and thunderstorms, possibility for strong to severe storms. Overnight lows will be in the mid 60s to near 70.

Friday temperatures will be in the 80s with afternoon showers and thunderstorm; storms that develop have the potential for heavy rain and to last into the evening hours. Overnight temperatures will be in the mid 50s to mid 60s.

Saturday temperatures will be in the 80s to low 90s with mostly dry and sunny conditions but afternoon thunderstorms are possible. Overnight temperatures will be in the mid 50s to mid 60s.

Sunday will have isolated afternoon showers & thunderstorms, with highs in the 80s to low 90s. Overnight temperatures will be in the 60s.

Monday temperatures will be in the 80s to low 90s with increasing humidity and possible afternoon showers and thunderstorms. Overnight temperatures will be in the 60s.

Tuesday highs will be in the 80s to low 90s with possible afternoon showers and thunderstorms. Overnight temperatures will be in the 60s.

Wednesday highs will be in the 80s to low 90s with possible afternoon showers and thunderstorms. Overnight temperatures will be in the 60s.

The seven-day precipitation amounts will range from a trace to one inch, with isolated higher amounts from thunderstorms.

The 8-14 day outlook (July 9-15) favors above-normal temperatures. The precipitation outlook favors near- to slightly above-normal amounts.

Maps of 8-14 day outlooks:
http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/predictions/814day/index.php

National Weather Service watch/warnings map:
http://www.weather.gov/erh/

US Drought Monitor
https://droughtmonitor.unl.edu/

CLIMOD2 (NRCC data interface):
http://climodtest.nrcc.cornell.edu

NYS DEC Clarifies Dicamba Court Decision

On June 3, 2020, the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit vacated the EPA’s registration of three products containing the active ingredient dicamba which effectively cancelled their federal registrations.
The three products are:
    • Xtendimax with Vaporgrip Technology, EPA Reg. No. 524-617;
    • Engenia, EPA Reg. No. 7969-345; and
    • FeXapan, EPA Reg. No. 352-913.
On June 8, 2020, in response to the Court’s decision, the EPA issued a Cancellation Order (https://www.epa.gov/sites/production/files/2020-06/documents/final_cancellation_order_for_three_dicamba_products.pdf) for these three products.
In light of the Court’s decision associated with these registrations and the provisions of  the EPA’s Cancellation Order to implement that decision, NYS DEC is taking the following actions:
Registrations. The registrations of the three products will be cancelled as of July 31, 2020 in accordance with the provisions of ECL Section 33-0713. Thirty days notice will be provided to the registrants of these products.
Distribution or Sale. Distribution or sale of existing stocks of the three products shall be limited as follows:
    • Distribution or sale by registrants is prohibited immediately, except for distribution for the purposes of proper disposal.
    • Distribution or sale of products that are already in the possession of someone other than the registrant is permitted only for disposal or to facilitate return to the registrant or a registered establishment.
    • Distribution or sale by commercial applicators is permitted to facilitate use no later than July 31, 2020.
Use. All use, including storage of open containers, is prohibited after July 31, 2020.
Questions about dicamba may be directed to pesticidecompliance@dec.ny.gov or ppr@dec.ny.gov or by calling 518-402-8727.
New York State Department of Environmental Conservation
625 Broadway, Albany, NY 12233-7254
P: 518-402-8748 | F: 518-402-9024| www.dec.ny.gov |

NNYADP Research: First-Ever Evaluation of European Meadow Fescue Varieties

Man in alfalfa field
NNYADP alfalfa-grass trials on regional dairy farms, include European meadow fescue varieties never before tested in North America. Photo: Jerry H. Cherney

Alfalfa-grass quality trials in northern New York State are evaluating European meadow fescue varieties never before tested in North America and the first modern variety of meadow fescue developed in the U.S. from plants isolated in southwestern Wisconsin. These trials support New York’s dairy industry by examining a forage crop grown to feed milking dairy cows.

The Northern New York Agricultural Development Program (NNYADP) is funding the research that is being conducted by the Cornell University research team of Debbie J.R. Cherney, Ph.D., and Jerry H. Cherney, Ph.D. The latest results report of trials on farms in NNY is posted under the Research: Field Crops: Grasses tab at www.nnyagdev.org.

The NNYADP trials are evaluating the opportunity to add European varieties of meadow fescue, a winter-tolerant perennial grass, to alfalfa plantings. The goal is to successfully grow meadow fescue as 20-30 percent of a mix with alfalfa under northern New York conditions. The spring harvest may account for up to half of the total forage yield of a crop grown to feed milking dairy cows.

“These regional trials are providing insight into alfalfa-grass combinations that can increase forage fiber digestibility enough to significantly increase milk income using balanced rations,” Debbie J.R. Cherney said.

“Many of the European meadow fescue varieties we are evaluating were developed in harsher environments than those in northern New York, so they should overwinter successfully here, but we need to evaluate the opportunity for yield and quality and their competitiveness with alfalfa,” Jerry Cherney explained.

The U.S.-bred meadow fescue in the NNYADP trial showed the highest neutral detergent fiber digestibility of the 19 varieties trialed in 2019. The seed supply of the variety known as Hidden Valley for the farm from which the variety has originated sold out almost immediately after it became available. The NNYADP trial data indicated that the Hidden Valley meadow fescue grew at the desired grass percentage in tandem with alfalfa.

Six farms in northern New York are participating in these forage research trials. In 2019, one farm harvested the trial plots twice, another farm harvested three times, and another participant harvested four times. A fourth farm successfully established a new seeding in 2019. Two additional farms joined the project in 2020, seeding trials with three new meadow fescue varieties released by a German seed company.

Harvested samples are assayed for alfalfa-grass percentage and alfalfa and grass quality in terms of crude protein, lignin, and fiber; dry matter yield; and evaluated for the influence of soil type, drainage, fertilization, seeding rate, and harvesting schedule on crop quality.

Funding for the Northern New York Agricultural Development Program is supported by the New York State Legislature and administered by the New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets. Learn more at www.nnyagdev.org.

Weather Outlook – June 25, 2020

Contributed by NOAA Northeast Regional Climate Center, Cornell University

Last week temperatures ranged from 4 to 10 degrees above normal. Precipitation has ranged from a hundredth of an inch to near 3 inches. Base 50 growing degree-days ranged from 120 to 170.

GDD Base 48 March 1 - June 24 GDD Base 48 May 1 - June 24 GDD Base 50 March 1 - June 24 GDD Base 50 May 1 - June 24

Today temperatures will be in the mid 70s to low 80s with scattered showers and thunderstorms. Overnight lows will be in the 50s.

Friday temperatures will be in the upper 70s to mid 80s with a mostly dry day, but some isolated afternoon showers are possible. Overnight temperatures will be in the mid 50s to mid 60s with showers possible.

Saturday temperatures will be in the upper 70s to mid 80s with humid conditions. A cold front will bring showers and thunderstorms across the state from west to east. Overnight temperatures will be in the 60s.

Sunday will have slight chance for showers, with highs in the upper 70s and 80s. Overnight temperatures will be in the mid 50s to low 60s.

Monday temperatures will be in the upper 70s to mid 80s with slight chance of showers and thunderstorms. Overnight temperatures will be in the mid 50s to low 60s.

Tuesday highs will be in the upper 70s to mid 80s with slight chance of showers and thunderstorms. Overnight temperatures will be in the mid 50s to low 60s.

Wednesday highs will be in the upper 70s to mid 80s with slight chance of showers and thunderstorms. Overnight temperatures will be in the mid 50s to low 60s.

The seven-day precipitation amounts will range from a quarter of an inch to one and a quarter inches.

The 8-14 day outlook (July 2-8) favors above-normal temperatures. The precipitation outlook favors near- to below-normal amounts.

Maps of 8-14 day outlooks:
http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/predictions/814day/index.php

National Weather Service watch/warnings map:
http://www.weather.gov/erh/

US Drought Monitor
http://droughtmonitor.unl.edu/Home.aspx

CLIMOD2 (NRCC data interface):
http://climodtest.nrcc.cornell.edu

 

Weather Outlook – June 18, 2020

Contributed by NOAA Northeast Regional Climate Center, Cornell University

Last week temperatures ranged from 2 to 6 degrees below normal. Precipitation has ranged from a hundredth of an inch to near 2 inches. Base 50 growing degree-days ranged from 30 to 110.

GDD Base 48 Mar 1 - Jun 17 GDD Base 48 May 1 - June 17 GDD Base 50 Mar 1 - Jun 17 GDD Base 50 May 1 - Jun 17

Today temperatures will be in the upper 70s to mid 80s with mostly dry conditions, but isolated showers and thunderstorms are possible. Overnight lows will be in the upper 50s to mid 60s.

Friday temperatures will be in the upper 70s to upper 80s with isolated showers and thunderstorms possible; locally heavy rainfall will be possible with any thunderstorms. Overnight temperatures will be in the low to mid 60s.

Saturday temperatures will be in the 80s to near 90 with increasing humidity and isolated showers and storms. Overnight temperatures will be in the 60s.

Sunday will have more afternoon showers and thunderstorms, with highs in the 80s. Overnight temperatures will be in the 60s.

Monday temperatures will be in the mid to upper 80s with showers and thunderstorms. Overnight temperatures will be in the 60s.

Tuesday highs will be in the 80s with shower and thunderstorms possible. Overnight temperatures will be in the 60s.

Wednesday highs will be in the 80s. Overnight temperatures will be in the 60s.

The seven-day precipitation amounts will range from a quarter of an inch to near one and a half inches.

The 8-14 day outlook (June 25 – July 1) favors above-normal temperatures and slightly above-normal precipitation.

Maps of 8-14 day outlooks:
http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/predictions/814day/index.php

National Weather Service watch/warnings map:
http://www.weather.gov/erh/

US Drought Monitor
http://droughtmonitor.unl.edu/Home.aspx

CLIMOD2 (NRCC data interface):
http://climodtest.nrcc.cornell.edu

 

Weather Outlook – June 11, 2020

Contributed by NOAA Northeast Regional Climate Center, Cornell University

Last week temperatures ranged from near normal to 8 degrees above normal. Precipitation has ranged from a hundredth of an inch to near 2 inches. Base 50 growing degree-days ranged from 50 to 150.

GDD Base 50 May 1 - June 10

GDD Base 50 March 1 - June 10 GDD Base 48 May 1 - June 10GDD Base 48 March 1 - June 10Today temperatures will be in the 70s to low 80s with heavy rain and isolated severe storms for eastern areas, and lingering showers for other areas from a passing cold front. Another front will pass today bringing less humid air and gusty conditions. Overnight lows will be in the 50s.

Friday temperatures will be in the 70s to low 80s with scattered afternoon showers possible. Overnight temperatures will be in the 40s to low 50s.

Saturday temperatures will be in the 60s to mid 70s; a few afternoon showers are possible but it should be a mostly dry day. Overnight temperatures will be in the 40s and low 50s.

Sunday will be, with highs in the 60s and 70s with scattered showers possible. Overnight temperatures will be in the 50s.

Monday temperatures will be in the 60s and 70s with scattered showers possible. Overnight temperatures will be in the 50s.

Tuesday highs will be in the 60s and 70s with scattered showers possible. Overnight temperatures will be in the 50s.

Wednesday highs will be in the upper 70s to low 80s with scattered showers possible. Overnight temperatures will be in the 50s.

The seven-day precipitation amounts will range from a hundredth of an inch to three quarters of an inches.

The 8-14 day outlook (June 18-24) favors above-normal temperatures and above-normal precipitation.

Maps of 8-14 day outlooks:
http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/predictions/814day/index.php

National Weather Service watch/warnings map:
http://www.weather.gov/erh/

US Drought Monitor
http://droughtmonitor.unl.edu/Home.aspx

CLIMOD2 (NRCC data interface):
http://climodtest.nrcc.cornell.edu

 

Weather Outlook – June 4, 2020

Contributed by NOAA Northeast Regional Climate Center, Cornell University

Last week temperatures ranged from near normal to 4 degrees above normal. Precipitation has ranged from a hundredth of an inch to near 3 inches. Base 50 growing degree-days ranged from 50 to 110.

GDD Base 48 Mar 1 - June 3 GDD Base 48 May 1 - June 3 GDD Base 50 Mar 1 - June 3 GDD Base 50 May 1 - June 3

Today temperatures will be in the 70s and 80s with mostly sunny and dry conditions; isolates showers and storms are possible late in the day. Overnight lows will be in the mid 50s to mid 60s.

Friday temperatures will be in the mid 70s and into the 80s, with isolated showers and thunderstorms, chances will increase toward evening with a passing cold front. Overnight temperatures will be in the mid 50s to mid 60s with muggy conditions; chance for showers and thunderstorms continues overnight.

Saturday temperatures will be in the 70s to low 80s with scattered showers and possibly some thunderstorms. Overnight temperatures will be in the mid 40s to mid 50s.

Sunday will be mostly dry, but northern areas may see scattered showers, with highs in the mid 60s to mid 70s. Overnight temperatures will be in the mid 40s to low 50s.

Monday temperatures will be in the low 70s with dry conditions. Overnight temperatures will be in mid 40s to 50s.

Tuesday highs will be in the mid 70s to mid 80s with dry conditions. Overnight temperatures will be in the 50s to low 60s.

Wednesday highs will be in the upper 70s to mid 80s with showers and thunderstorms possible. Overnight temperatures will be in the mid 50s to low 60s.

The seven-day precipitation amounts will range from a tenth of an inch to one and a quarter inches.

The 8-14 day outlook (June 11-17) favors below-normal temperatures and near- to above-normal precipitation.

Maps of 8-14 day outlooks:
http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/predictions/814day/index.php

National Weather Service watch/warnings map:
http://www.weather.gov/erh/

US Drought Monitor
http://droughtmonitor.unl.edu/Home.aspx

CLIMOD2 (NRCC data interface):
http://climodtest.nrcc.cornell.edu