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Spotted lanternfly adult on the trunk or a tree.

The New York State Departments of Environmental Conservation (DEC) and Agriculture and Markets (DAM) today confirmed that spotted lanternfly (SLF), an invasive pest from Asia, has been found in Albany and Yates counties. A single adult insect was discovered in a vehicle in the Capital District. In addition, a single adult insect was reported on a private Keuka Lake property in Penn Yan, Yates County.

State agencies encourage the public to report findings of spotted lanternfly, an invasive pest. More details about this insect are below the press release.

DEC and our partners at the Department of Agriculture and Markets are closely tracking the spotted lanternfly, a destructive invasive pest, as part of our ongoing efforts to prevent its establishment and spread in New York. This pest has the potential to severely impact our state's agricultural and tourism industries,” DEC Commissioner Basil Seggos said. “We are encouraging the public to send us information to bolster our efforts—they are our eyes on the ground.”

Following both reported cases, DEC and DAM immediately began extensive surveys throughout the area. At this time, no additional insects have been found. DEC and DAM urge New Yorkers to report potential sightings to spottedlanternfly@dec.ny.govAnyone that suspects they have found SLF is encouraged to send a photo to spottedlanternfly@dec.ny.gov.

State Agriculture Commissioner Richard A. Ball said, “It’s critical that we monitor for and control this invasive species, which can weaken plants and have a devastating impact on our farm crops and agricultural production, especially apples, grapes and hops. Since our farmers are among those facing the greatest potential impact, we ask them to join us in helping to watch for the spotted lanternfly, and signs of infestation, and report any sightings immediately.”

SLF (photo above) is a destructive pest that feeds on more than 70 plant species including tree-of-heaven (Ailanthus altissima), maples, apple trees, grapevine, and hops. SLF feedings can stress plants, making them vulnerable to disease and attacks from other insects. SLF also excretes large amounts of sticky "honeydew," which attracts sooty molds that interfere with plant photosynthesis, negatively affecting the growth and fruit yield of plants. SLF also has the potential to significantly hinder quality of life due to the honeydew and the swarms of insects it attracts.

SLF was first discovered in Pennsylvania in 2014 and have since been found in New Jersey, Delaware and Virginia. Given the proximity to the Pennsylvania and New Jersey infestations, New York State is at high risk for infestation. While these insects can jump and fly short distances, they spread primarily through human activity. SLF lay their eggs on any number of surfaces such as vehicles, stone, rusty metal, outdoor furniture and firewood. Therefore, the insects can hitch rides on any outdoor item and be easily transported into and throughout New York.

Jennifer Grant, Ph.D., Cornell University Director New York State IPM Program said, “Knowing that this pest was likely to arrive, we have been working with our State partner agencies to develop integrated strategies to get the word out and manage SLF in grapes, hops, apples and other susceptible crops. It’s imperative that the public help slow the invasion and spread by reporting possible sightings and acting responsibly when traveling in quarantine areas.”

Adult SLF are active from July to December. They are approximately one-inch long and half an inch wide at rest, with eye-catching wings. Adults begin laying eggs in October. Signs of an SLF infestation may include:

  • Sap oozing or weeping from open wounds on tree trunks, which appear wet and give off fermented odors.
  • One-inch-long egg masses that are brownish-gray, waxy and mud-like when new. Old egg masses are brown and scaly.
  • Massive honeydew build-up under plants, sometimes with black sooty mold developing.

Anyone that suspects they have found SLF is encouraged to send a photo to spottedlanternfly@dec.ny.gov. Please note the location of where the insect was found, egg masses, and/or infestation signs. DEC and DAM also encourage the public to inspect outdoor items such as vehicles, furniture, and firewood for egg masses. Anyone that visits the Pennsylvania or New Jersey Quarantine Areas should thoroughly inspect their vehicle, luggage and gear for SLF and egg masses before leaving and scrape off all egg masses.

A Smartphone app is also available to help citizens and conservation professionals quickly and easily report new invasive species sightings directly to New York’s invasive species database from their phones. For more information, visit http://www.nyimapinvasives.org/ (leaves DEC website).

DEC, DAM, New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation and the US Department of Agriculture will continue to survey throughout the Capital District and the Finger Lakes focusing on travel corridors and high-risk areas. Extensive surveys will continue to be conducted in high-risk areas throughout the state as well as inspections of nursery stock, stone shipments, commercial transports, etc., from Pennsylvania. DEC and DAM will also continue its efforts to educate the public as well as industry personnel.

For more information on SLF, visit www.dec.ny.gov/animals/113303.html.
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Spotted Lanternfly (Lycorma delicatula) Update:

The spotted lanternfly (SLF), also known as Chinese blistering cicada, is a plant hopper with piercing sucking mouthparts.

Discovered in Pennsylvania in 2014, the spotted lanternfly presents a threat to both woody and non-woody hosts that are present throughout the United States.  While their list of hosts is large, the greatest agricultural concern falls on crops such as grapes, apples, stone fruits, blueberries, and hops.  Its presence could lead to crop loss and increased management costs.

Fourth instar of spotted lanternfly, before the adult stage.

Spotted lanternfly lays eggs on any smooth and strong surface, including plant material, stones, bricks, metal, and plastic. Each egg mass contains 30-50 eggs in rows, usually covered in a mud-like substance. Spotted lanternfly may require Tree of Heaven (Ailanthus altissima) to complete all life stages; however, research is underway to confirm if SLF can use other species—such as black walnut or hops. One generation occurs per year: adults develop in July, lay eggs in September, which overwinter. The first three instars are wingless, black with white spots, while the final instars turn red before becoming adults.

Both adults and nymphs commonly gather in large numbers on host plants to feed, and are easiest to see at dusk or at night.  Extensive feeding causes sap to ooze from trunks and branches, and a fermented odor can occur over time.  Honeydew excretions also encourage sooty mold build-up on leaves, fruit, and around the bases of trees.

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This Wednesday! "Using Hummingbirds to Help Control SWD" — a twilight meeting in Salem, NY hosted by Laura McDermott, Eastern NY Commercial Horticulture Program (ENYCHP). Biological and cultural controls of SWD are possible! Now that SWD numbers are increasing, every tactic used will help protect your late season berries.

Come learn about ongoing research into encouraging hummingbird predation on SWD adults. Dr. Juliet Carroll of Cornell NYS IPM will also discuss new research into better thresholds for monitoring SWD and how those thresholds will more accurately inform spray decisions. Managing crop canopy and weeds are also critical for SWD control.

If you don't want to spray, ENYCHP will have current information on exclusion netting work over berries, so you can plan to cover your crop next year.

Hummingbirds eat lots of small insects, including aphids and fruit flies, to supplement their nectar-rich diet. Up to 2000 per day!

DEC Credits Pending.

WHEN:
Wednesday, August 22, 2018
5:00 to 7:00 PM

LOCATION:
Gardenworks Farm
1055 County Rte 30
Salem, NY 12865

COST:  Free and Open to the public

Please Register online at:
https://enych.cce.cornell.edu/event.php?id=972
Or call Abby Henderson at 518-746-2553

More about hummingbirds is in the Hummingbirds SWD blog post.

Ticks don’t really care where you are farming so we are hoping to keep all our growers safe from tick borne diseases.

If you have not already, please take this short survey:  https://tinyurl.com/yc7rnd6r

The blacklegged tick will search for hosts typically below adult knee-height by holding onto vegetation with their back legs while holding their front legs out as hosts pass by — a behavior known as questing. Photo: J. Lampman, NYS IPM

The Community IPM Program (part of NYSIPM) was funded by the NY State Senate Task Force on Lyme and Tick Borne Disease to create an educational campaign about the risks of tick exposure and tick awareness for New York.

Community IPM addresses non-agricultural pest issues for every New York resident, including farmers. This survey is a research project to help us understand what tick issues and concerns NY farmers are facing on their farms and home properties.

By completing this survey you are agreeing to participate in this research. Your answers are completely anonymous and will help us understand how serious the issue is and how to raise awareness with the farming community.

Please fill out the survey (just 10 questions!) here:  https://tinyurl.com/yc7rnd6r

For more information about this survey or about ticks and tick prevention or control, please contact Jody Gangloff-Kaufmann at jlg23@cornell.edu.

Thank you!

Starting at 5:00 PM today, Thursday, July 19, 2018, a field meeting on Exclusion Netting & SWD Monitoring will be held. The meeting runs from 5:00pm to 7:00pm at the Poughkeepsie Farm Project.

Exclusion netting over high tunnel raspberries will protect them from SWD.

Attend the meeting to see and learn about an SWD exclusion netting trial in raspberries!

Peter Jentsch, entomologist with the Hudson Valley Research Lab, will discuss the exclusion netting trail taking place at the Poughkeepsie Farm Project.

LOCATION:
Poughkeepsie Farm Project
51 Vassar Farm Lane
Poughkeepsie, NY 12603

More reasons to attend:

  • Peter Jentsch will discuss attract and kill baits in a U-Pick raspberry planting.
  • Bring a berry sample and have it tested for SWD via salt flotation.
  • Have a conundrum? — bring a plant sample and ask the ENYCHP Cornell Cooperative Extension experts.
  • View low tunnels over strawberries to extend the season and protect them from rain.
  • Attendees can enter for a chance to win free SWD monitoring traps!

This meeting is Free and Open to the public.
Please Register Online at: https://enych.cce.cornell.edu/event.php?id=971
Or Call Abby Henderson at 518-746-2553

Sponsored by:
Hudson Valley Research Lab & CCE Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture Program

A national team of researchers lead by the University of Georgia has released a new guide to organic management of SWD this May, 2018, Management Recommendations for SWD in Organic Berry Crops. The guide details information on non-chemical and insecticide approaches to protect berry crops against SWD.

Controlling SWD is particularly challenging, requiring a rigorous, persistent and diverse management plan. The guide details several management recommendations and suggests using as many control techniques as possible to reduce SWD infestation.

Funding for the research was provided by the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture Organic Agriculture Research and Extension Initiative (OREI).

Download the guide in PDF form here, http://www.ipm.msu.edu/uploads/files/SWD/SWDOrganicBerryCrops.PDF.

This post was written be Peter Werts, EcoFruit, IPM Institute of North America, Inc.

A reminder that there will be a workshop on SWD in Chemung County on Tuesday July 10th, 2018, from 9:30 to 11:00 am. Cornell Cooperative Extension (CCE) of Chemung and Tioga Counties cordially invite all interested regional fruit producers to this meeting, Spotted Wing Drosophila Update and Discussion for Fruit Producers.

Two SWD on a blueberry, photographed in early September 2013. SWD populations typically build to very high levels in late summer and early autumn.

The workshop will be held at the Waverly Village Hall, Meeting Room, at 32 Ithaca St, Waverly, NY 14892.

Shona Ort, Agricultural Development Specialist, CCE of Chemung County, is organizing this event.  To register, contact Shona Ort of CCE Chemung at 607-734-4453 ext 227 or sbo6@cornell.edu.

Two informative presentations, followed by open floor discussion, will round out your knowledge of SWD and it's management.

  1. Dr. Julie Carroll, Fruit IPM Coordinator, New York State IPM Program, will provide a general overview in, Spotted Wing Drosophila: what we know and what we don’t
    • what is it?
    • how do I know it's SWD?
    • what fruit can SWD attack?
    • when does SWD arrive?
    • how do I manage it?
  2. Dr. Dara Stockton, Postdoctoral Associate with Dr. Greg Loeb’s lab, Dept. of Entomology, will provide a comprehensive research overview in, Current Research on SWD control in Central NY
    • improving insecticide applications
    • monitoring
    • repellents
    • protected culture
    • offseason control
  3. Join a discussion with growers to wrap up your knowledge of SWD to take back to your farm!

Cost to attend is free of charge! Please pre-register with Shona Ort, at 607-734-4453 ext 227 or sbo6@cornell.edu to ensure we have enough space, handouts, and refreshments.

There were a few changes during the past year in the insecticides registered in New York State for SWD management. Most notably:

  • Delegate WG, spinetoram (new product label, 62719-541) no longer needs a 2ee for use on stone fruits, grapes, brambles and blueberries. There is also a supplemental label for blueberries.
  • Radiant, spinetoram (new product label, 62719-545) no longer needs a 2ee for use on strawberries.
  • Entrust SC, spinosad (new product label, 62719-621) no longer needs a 2ee for use on blueberries.
  • Mustang Maxx, zeta-cypermethrin (new product, 279-3426) no longer requires the 2ee for use on stone fruits, grapes, brambles and blueberries.
  • Minecto Pro, cyantaniliprole & abamectin (100-1592) is a combination insecticide for use on stone fruits.

You can get to the quick guides from the Spotted Wing Drosophila Management page: http://fruit.cornell.edu/spottedwing/management/

The quick guides are now always at the same url, so this won't change with newly posted updates. Please point to the new url on your websites or bookmarks.

Remember, the pesticide label is the law. For example, if you have an older product whose label doesn't have SWD on it, you'll need to have the 2ee that goes with that product label.

 

 

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Chemung County is hosting a Spotted Wing Drosophila Update and Discussion for Fruit Producers on Tuesday July 10th, 2018, from 9:30 to 11:00 am. This morning session is open to all interested fruit growers and will be held at the Waverly Village Hall, Meeting Room, at 32 Ithaca St, Waverly, NY 14892. Spread the word!

Cornell Cooperative Extension (CCE) of Chemung and Tioga Counties would like to cordially invite regional fruit producers to this meeting on the Spotted Wing Drosophila. Shona Ort, Agricultural Development Specialist, CCE of Chemung County, is organizing this event.


For questions and to register, please contact Shona Ort of CCE Chemung at 607-734-4453 ext 227 or sbo6@cornell.edu.


Male SWD on raspberry. Photo by Dave Handley, UMaine Extension, Highmoor Farm.

Dr. Julie Carroll, Fruit IPM Coordinator, New York State IPM Program, and Dr. Dara Stockton, Postdoctoral Research Associate in Dr. Greg Loeb's lab, Dept. of Entomology, will give an update on this pest and participate in a discussion with growers on what folks are currently doing to combat it.

Cost to attend is free of charge, but pre-registration is requested in order to ensure enough space, handouts, and refreshments.

Tomorrow! Tuesday, August 29, 2017 from 5:00 to 7:00 PM at The Berry Patch, 15589 NY-22, Stephentown, NY 12168 this workshop will cover the following topics:

  • Plasticulture strawberry production for June bearing and day neutral varieties
  • Low tunnel strawberry production
  • High tunnel raspberry production
  • Exclusion netting to control SWD in blueberries
  • Using computer models to improve pest management of berry crops
  • Collaboration between NEWA, newa.cornell.edu, and NYS Mesonet, www.nysmesonet.org
High tunnel raspberry production.

Register by calling Abby at 518-746-2553 or registering the ENYCHP website, enych.cce.cornell.edu.

There is no fee, but it will help us provide the appropriate number of handouts etc.

This workshop event will happen rain or shine.

If you have questions, please contact Laura McDermott: 518-791-5038 or lgm4@cornell.edu.

Come and learn from experts! There will be plenty of time for your questions and discussion.

  • Dr. Greg Loeb, Cornell
  • Dr. Juliet Carroll, NYS IPM and NEWA
  • Dale Ila Riggs, The Berry Patch
  • Laura McDermott, CCE ENYCHP

This field workshop is for the commercial berry grower.
Monitoring for pests, designing an effective pest control program, understanding cultural and chemical SWD management strategies and general troubleshooting will all be part of this workshop.

 

Monitoring of SWD in New York has begun! Twelve Cornell Cooperative Extension programs and 13 extension scientists are cooperating this year. Some research sites may also be included in the mix, courtesy of the programs of Greg Loeb at the NY State Agricultural Experiment Station in Geneva, NY and Peter Jentsch at the Hudson Valley Laboratory in Highland, NY. Below are listed the Extension personnel who are monitoring SWD in New York in 2017.

Participants and counties included in the 2017 SWD monitoring network.

Traps will be set in 21 counties. Based on research results comparing various lures, we are using the Scentry trap and lure for our monitoring network, as we did in 2016.  We’ll post trap catch reports to this blog and enter them into the SWD distribution map.

Monitoring SWD traps in 2013 - trap is a simple plastic container with apple cider vinegar. Current traps and lures are more selective for SWD than this trap was.

Our Cornell Fruit Resources website is being launched in a new format and location this week. We are doing our best to redirect you to those resources from within the new site. Some of those pages contain SWD information. As that information is revised for 2017, I’ll post it on the SWD blog and include the new link.

Reports of early trap catch this year are coming in from Michigan. However, fruit is not susceptible until it is close to fully ripe. Currently, June strawberry fruit is green, early blueberries have just set fruit and raspberries are just starting to bloom. No risk of SWD infestation at this time.

Growers interested in monitoring for SWD in their berry plantings can contact me for information and tips, Juliet Carroll, Fruit IPM Coordinator, jec3@cornell.edu.

My upcoming blog will be a review of IPM tactics for SWD in berries. Stay tuned and stay prepared.

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