Fortuna plans Chemung County Injection Well

Fortuna Energy held a public meeting at the Van Etten High School auditorium near Spencer, NY on Wednesday March 4th regarding their plans to test water injection into the Mallula #1 well in Chemung County. The company plans to test the water storage capabilities of the well and target formation. 

Fortuna engineers on hand said the 9.500 foot deep test well is a currently a gas well in the Trenton Black River Formation that is nearing the end of production. Fortuna plans to inject an initial 2,000 gallons of Brine water into the formation and test water pressure levels over the course of a month.  

The engeneers explained that the level of drop in water pressure over time will indicate the ultimate storage capacity of the formation, and if the pressure drops to an acceptable level after a month the company will repeat the injection process to perform further testing.  

The company expects initial down-hole water pressures of approximately 5000 PSI.  The Engineers explained that the 5000 PSI required is indeed comparable to the pressures used in Hydraulic Fracturing of the Marcellus Shale, however the Trenton Black River geologic formation is such that pressures greater than 50,000 psi would be needed to rupture the target zone.  The company also expressed their confidence that there is no possibly of underground migration of the water and that proper testing and bonding would be performed. 

The company says that if successful, they currently plan to inject only produced Brine water from Trenton Black River wells and not used “frac water” from Marcellus Shale operations, although they said it was possible they could choose to do so in the future. The company said it is also planning to test an injection well in northern Pennsylvania, but noted that except for these few areas, the vast majority of geology in the region is not favorable to water storage.  

 

-Jeffrey

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6 Responses to Fortuna plans Chemung County Injection Well

  1. lisa wright says:

    The previous post on this blog announced that this was a public meeting-but even with Fortuna’s “Good Neighbor” policy–the meeting was not publicized in any papers. The closely kept announcement said:

    “Fortuna Energy chemists, engineers, legal and public relations advisors will be on hand to present information, receive comments and answer questions from the public, local officials and residents.”

    There were no chemists as promised. Rick Kessy is not a chemist. And I did not get an answer to my question.

    I asked:”Will there be perfluorooctanoic acids or 2-Butoxyethanol in any of Fortuna’s anticipated disposal wells?” Mr. Kessy said he could not answer that question–didn’t even offer to get back to me after consulting with a proper chemist. I repeated the question and the question remain unanswered.

    Of course we know why Kessy evaded the question, and why he is reduced to giving laughably insufficient answers to questions about Fortuna’s plans for the injection wells. He said numerous times that he is confident that injection wells will be safe. He is very confident there will be no contamination, and we should just trust him, though he cannot cite any studies verifying safety. I may not have liked his response, but in the context of his role at Fortuna, Kessy’s just doing his job.

    But I have to wonder how the self-respecting scientists at this land-grant University can support or ignore unconventional drilling in our midst– and then go on to write effete papers about sustainability and renewable or green energy.

    Any half-wit knows unconventional gas drilling requires tremendously non-green activities to get the gas. The disparities and injustices of living in a “town and gown” city like Ithaca come into high relief when our local people’s concerns in Spencer Van-Etten are summarily ignored by the public health, environmental, eco-justice, and sustainability professionals from Cornell. And sending sociologists to landowner’s coalitions meetings just doesn’t cut it.

    Lisa Wright

  2. lisa ann wright says:

    I am embarrassed for New York State’s lack of scientists/environmentalists/politicians brave enough to challenge their colleagues’ support of the gas industry. Blogs like this, (which no one reads) are supposed to show how open the dialogue is, but for an increasing number of people and organizations statewide, the truth of hydraulic fracturing and regulatory compliance/enabling are glaringly obvious. In ten years, as the laughingly bad science, industry bumbling and political back-scratching continues, and as more land and water is poisoned for perpetuity, we will see the demise of the reputations of those who have been charged to protect us, as well as those who stood by in silence.

    From the Rocket Courier

    Injection wells use high-pressure pumps to inject liquid wastes into underground geologic formations. The belief is that wastes “may be isolated from drinking water aquifers when injected between impermeable rock strata,” according to one EPA report. The agency does concede that this disposal method is controversial “and many scientists are concerned that leaks from these wells may contaminate groundwater.”

    Injection wells are defined by the type of fluid that would be injected into them, from I to IV, with I having the least potential of polluting the groundwater because it is disposed in isolated rock formations. The brine and wastewater created at gas and oil drilling sites would be injected into a Class II well. Class IV, by the way, is for hazardous or radioactive wastes—and, yes, such wells are permitted in other states.

    http://74.95.82.236:591/rconline/FMPro?-db=rconline.fp5&-format=record_detail.html&-lay=detail&-sortfield=currentrecordid&-sortorder=descend&TopStory=Y&IsCurrent=Y&-recid=12611418&-find=

  3. Be careful dealing with these oil and gas production companies. Our experience has been that they privatize profits and socialize costs. Radiation from enhanced oil and gas recovery is a big problem since radium-226 is water soluble and has a 1600 year half-life.

  4. David Smith says:

    Wow, here we go again! Be careful dealing with these oil and gas production companies. Our experience has been that they privatize profits and socialize costs.Injection wells use high-pressure pumps to inject liquid wastes into underground geologic formations. The belief is that wastes “may be isolated from drinking water aquifers when injected between impermeable rock strata,according to one EPA report. The agency does concede that this disposal method is controversial “and many scientists are concerned that leaks from these wells may contaminate groundwater.We have to monitor the monitors to insure that we do not contaminate the water we need to survive. We must weigh the value to benefit of this type of process.

  5. Jamie Smith says:

    In reality Mr Rick Kessy has a degree in Chemical Engineering which puts him solidly in a postion of knowledge to comment. Unfortunately Lisa Wright must have been taking tips from Readers Digest on what is the latest evil chemical in this world and believes the natural gas companies are out to poison the world

    Print that Jeffy or are you not willing to allow another view

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