New York State IPM Program

April 20, 2016
by Mary M. Woodsen
Comments Off on BioBlitz! Earth Day Helps Teach Appreciation of Wild Things on Golf Courses

BioBlitz! Earth Day Helps Teach Appreciation of Wild Things on Golf Courses

BioBlitzLogo 2016It’s BioBlitz time. Beginning on Earth Day (Friday, April 22) and running through Migratory Bird Day (Saturday, May 24), hundreds of Audubon International-certified golf courses are hosting events for golfers, their families, their friends (kids too) — to see who can find and ID as many plants and critters (bugs and mushrooms count too) as they possibly can.

Fluffy owlets have a home at Bethpage State Park's golf course. Photo courtesy Audubon International.

Fluffy owlets have a home at Bethpage State Park’s golf course. Photo courtesy Audubon International.

In fact, any golf course in the world is welcome to participate. Most will have skilled group leaders on hand to help with ID or offer a pair of sharp eyes and ears to help people distinguish among the range of plants and animals whose homes border on fairways and roughs — especially those rare or endangered species.

And prizes? There’ll be prizes — but the biggest prize of all is engaging local interest, understanding, and support of the environmental advantages golf courses can provide to their towns.

Staghorn sumac at Bethpage provide great food reserves for migrating birds. Photo courtesy Audubon International.

Staghorn sumac at Bethpage State Park provide great winter food reserves for songbirds. Photo courtesy Audubon International.

 

 

 

April 19, 2016
by Joellen Lampman
Comments Off on iMapInvasives Training

iMapInvasives Training

 Study nature, love nature, stay close to nature. It will never fail you. – Frank Lloyd Wright

Do you go outside? Then the NY Natural Heritage Program is looking for you to help map invasive species! And they are providing free training throughout the state for your convenience.

iMapMobile_20150528

iMapInvasives is now available on your smartphone.

iMapInvasives New York is New York State’s on-line all-taxa invasive species database and mapping tool. It’s one stop shopping to provide information on your invasive species observations and surveys in NY and control efforts. You can even use your smartphone to report new findings (a new feature for those that have already received training).

Training is required to enter data, and free sessions are being offered this spring in each of the Partnerships for Regional Invasive Species Management (or PRISM for those in the know). It includes beginner and advanced levels — plus sessions on how to identify invasive at some of the locations.

Citizen scientists, educators, and natural resource professionals are part of New York’s invasive species early detection network. Join them by learning how to use iMapInvasives. Visit www.nyimapinvasives.org for schedule details and registration.Training schedule 2016 spring

Questions? Contact imapinvasives@nynhp.org.

And speaking of invasives, you can ensure your garden and landscape are not contributing to the invasives problem by using choosing native plants. Walk away from the Japanese barberry and Norway maple and discover other beautiful options. Alternatives to Ornamental Invasive Plants: A Sustainable Solution for New York State is available online.

The Invasive Species Database Program is supported by the NYS Environmental Protection Fund through a contract with the NYS Department of Environmental Conservation.

 

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