New York State IPM Program

October 4, 2019
by Debra E. Marvin
Comments Off on A Look Back at our Beneficial Habitat Events

A Look Back at our Beneficial Habitat Events

Photo of Betsy Lamb, Amara Dunn and Brian Eshenaur during twilight meetingOn Wednesday September 25th, Dr. Amara Dunn, Dr. Betsy Lamb, and Senior Extension Educator Brian Eshenaur hosted a Beneficial Habitat Open House. Guests could compare establishment methods, see some of the insects caught in our plots, or just enjoy the flowers.

Thursday September 26th was the Planting for Beneficial Habitat Twilight meeting. Attendees learned how habitat for pollinators and other beneficial insects show good stewardship of the land. Dr. Dunn explained several methods of establishment, the benefits of hosting pollinators and other beneficial insects, and their impact as biological control.

For more, visit the Bicontrol Bytes Blog Creating Habitat for Beneficial Insects, Summer 2018
Creating Habitat for Beneficial Insects; Project Update End of Year One
Come Visit our Beneficial Insect Habitat Plots ,
Creating Habitat; Starting Year Two  
Photo shows Dr. Amara Dunn speaking with two attendees at the Beneficial Habitat Open House

Dr. Amara Dunn speaks with Cooperative Extension visitors.

Photo shows rows of small evergreen trees at the NYSIPM research plot at Cornell Agritech Fruit and Vegetable Research Farm

Evergreen plantings on the NYSIPM plot, Cornell Agritech Fruit and Vegetable Research Farm

photo shows at least one plot of beneficial habitat plants and part of a row of small evergreens

Does adding beneficial habitat reduce pest pressure on Christmas tree plots? We hope to find out.

photo shows six guests and two speakers from the IPM program standing near one of the habitat plots

Despite stormy skies, the Twilight Event was a success

photo shows Brian Eshenaur and Amara Dunn discussing the research plot

Brian Eshenaur and Amara Dunn address attendees of the Twilight Meeting

Photo shows college students working with insects around a table as Dr. Betsy Lamb directs them.

Keuka College students in Dr. Bill Brown’s Animal Diversity class compare pairs of insect samples. Dr. Betsy Lamb invited them to hypothesize differences in collected insects at varying locations within the plots, and at different times of the year.

Thank you to all who helped make these teaching events possible!

September 6, 2019
by Debra E. Marvin
Comments Off on Weeding Now Reduces Weeds Later

Weeding Now Reduces Weeds Later

Photo shows Dr. Bryan Brown in a soybean field looking at a waterhemp plant.

Dr. Bryan Brown examines a single WATERHEMP plant capable of producing thousands of seeds.

Summer annual weeds start flowering in early August, so it’s important to control them beforehand to prevent seed production. This is true for commercial growers and for homeowners.  One of the most prolific is waterhemp, a bane to growers because it’s also resistant to herbicides. According to our INTEGRATED WEED MANAGEMENT SPECIALIST, DR. BRYAN BROWN, waterhemp is likely resistant to herbicide Groups 2, 5, and 9 in NY.

photo of top of mature waterhemp plant

That’s why Bryan is collaborating with growers and researchers around the state to investigate other controls, including cultivation, cover cropping, and even a device that zaps weeds with electricity. Funding for this work was provided by the Farm Viability Institute.

“Here we’re removing waterhemp that survived some of our herbicide treatments in soybeans. Because this trial is done in a grower’s field and we don’t want it to spread, we’re removing it before it sets seed (up to 500,000).”

Soybean grower? Here’s what Bryan and Regional Field Crops Specialist, Mike Hunter explained in their CORNELL FIELD CROPS Blog:

While other pigweed species have short hairs on their stems, waterhemp and Palmer amaranth have smooth stems. The best way to distinguish waterhemp and Palmer amaranth is to rip off one of the lower leaves. Another characteristic of waterhemp and Palmer amaranth is separate male (pollen producing) and female (seed producing) plants. Herbicide resistance traits can transfer by pollen, which has allowed these weeds to develop resistance faster.

To prevent these weeds from taking hold, growers are also recommended to start weed-free with tillage, followed by a 2-pass program of residual and post-emergence herbicides that utilizes several effective sites of action. Foliar applied herbicides should be used when these weeds are less than four inches tall. Since these weeds emerge over a broader timeframe than most weeds, mid-season residual herbicide applications should be considered, along with increased planting density or tighter row spacing to help close the canopy earlier.

photo shows close up of water hemp stalk with small leaves

Waterhemp weed showing growth pattern.

If you do find yourself with escapes of these weeds, it makes economic sense to go hand-rogue those weeds out of your fields rather than deal with 200,000 to one million seeds in your soil from each weed. If there are too many to bag up by hand, consider sacrificing that patch of your crop by mowing and tilling the area before the weeds produce seed. Avoid harvesting these areas. Combines are especially good at spreading weed seeds. If you must harvest these areas, know that combines can carry 150 pounds of plant material even you think it’s empty, so check out some of the great online videos on how to clean them out after going through weedy fields.

The weakness of waterhemp and Palmer amaranth is the short lifespan of their seeds in the soil. Of those that don’t germinate, very few will survive in the soil for more than four years. So, if you can keep it under control for four years, you won’t have much of it after that. But as one Pennsylvania grower put it, “the cheapest way to control Palmer amaranth is to never get it in the first place.” So, it’s important to make sure that your seed, feed, bedding, and equipment are clean from the start.

Photo of Dr. Bryan Brown with waterhemp weeds we removed from a soybean field.

Dr. Bryan Brown works with growers, extension educators, industry leaders, and researchers to address knowledge gaps in weed IPM and develop programming to improve adoption of effective weed management practices. His work covers all agricultural crops throughout New York.

logo of New York Farm Viability Institute

Thank you, NY Farm Viability Institute

July 20, 2019
by Joellen Lampman
Comments Off on Revisiting wild parsnip

Revisiting wild parsnip

Wild parsnip sap can cause painful, localized burning and blistering of the skin. – New York State Department of of Environmental Conservation

Wild parsnip going to seed. The sap form this widely spreading invasive plant can cause severe burns.

Wild parsnip going to seed. The sap in this widely spreading invasive plant can cause severe burns.

A few weeks ago we discussed the invasive wild parsnip as a hidden danger for weekend weedwackers. Now it is much more obvious with its bright yellow flowers, but if you are looking to control it now, straight mowing is off the table. Some of the heads are going to seed and mowing will simply distribute those seeds, ensuring a new crop of wild parsnip next year.

Whether you choose to dig out the root, cut the root an inch or two below the soil, or mow, first cut the seed head off with clippers and put it in a plastic bag. The bag can then be left in the sun to rot the seeds before disposal. And don’t forget to wear protective clothing to prevent any sap from reaching exposed skin or eyes.

Use a boot brush to clean mud and seeds off your boots.

Use a boot brush to clean mud and seeds off your boots. Remember to check the tread!

This is also the time of year when seeds of this and other invasive species can be accidentally transported by hikers and dog walkers. Avoid brushing against plants. Check shoes, clothing, and gear after leaving an area. Remove any seeds that are found and seal them in a plastic bag. (This can double as a tick check!)

For more information on preventing the spread of invasive species while hiking, biking, camping, and, well, any outdoor play, a great resource is PlayCleanGo. And consider taking their pledge to Stop Invasive Species in Your Tracks.

Let’s stay safe out there!

April 26, 2019
by Debra E. Marvin
Comments Off on Local Girl Scouts Troop Hosts Dr. Betsy Lamb of NYS IPM to Learn About Pollinators

Local Girl Scouts Troop Hosts Dr. Betsy Lamb of NYS IPM to Learn About Pollinators

Today’s Post is by Jaime Cummings

Girl scouts troop 40001 in Trumansburg, NY is working on their Bronze Award, which involves planning and establishing a pollinator-friendly community garden for raising awareness about the importance of pollinators in agriculture, our landscape, and community.  The girls have spent nearly 20 hours preparing for their garden, including researching the best flowers to grow, planning the layout of the garden, learning about the more than 500 species of pollinators in NY, planting seeds of many perennial flowers that benefit pollinators, and writing letters to community leaders requesting a site for the garden to raise awareness in the community.

On Earth Day, Dr. Betsy Lamb of the NYS Integrated Pest Management Program was invited to share her horticultural expertise and passion for pollinators with the girl scouts.  Dr. Lamb shared examples of the many bees, flies, butterflies, moths, bats and hummingbirds who pollinate our native, ornamental and agricultural crops in NY.  The girls learned how bees see in the ultraviolet spectrum and that many flowers are specifically designed with their particular pollinators in mind to maximize reproduction.  Dr. Lamb provided many samples of fresh flowers for the girls to dissect and to learn about flower anatomy and biology as it pertains to the various methods of pollination, which was a big hit with the girls!  She also gave some tips on garden establishment to ensure success.

The girls shared their plans for the garden with Dr. Lamb, who was impressed by the knowledge of the girls and the wide range of beneficial blooms they had selected to plant.  The garden will include 13 different types of flowers, selected with different bloom types and flowering times to feed and support pollinators from spring to fall, along with an informational sign on the benefits of pollinators and beneficial insects to our community.  The garden will be established this summer for the Trumansburg community to enjoy for years to come.  This sort of hands-on learning, fostered by Dr. Lamb, will not soon be forgotten by these girl scouts!

Post provided by Jaime Cummings   NYSIPM Field Crops and Livestock IPM Coordinator and Girl Scout Leader.

Thanks to Dr. Betsy Lamb, NYSIPM Ornamental IPM Coordinator

***NYSIPM staff are looking forward to photos of this pollinator garden so we hope to share them with you all as well!

 

April 22, 2019
by Debra E. Marvin
Comments Off on Weeding Robot!

Weeding Robot!

Today’s post is from our Integrated Weed Management Specialist, Bryan Brown.

Bryan can be found at our main office in Geneva

_ _ _ _ _

Many of us love gardening. But not many of us enjoy weeding. Robots to the rescue!

Franklin Robotics has built a robot to control weeds and they sent us one of their prototypes for initial testing before it hits the market. Their robot, Tertill, moves around the garden with a string-trimmer (a.k.a. weedwacker) that cuts up small weeds while its sensor allows it to move around your larger, planted flowers or vegetables. Its wheels are also designed to dislodge small weeds.

While this robot is designed for small gardens, larger robots are also being developed for farms. As farmers face labor shortages and herbicide-resistant weeds, robotic weeders could help alleviate these challenges. Several companies are taking very different approaches in their designs. One model undercuts weed roots, another punches small weeds into the ground, and a third places a drop of herbicide on the weed’s growing point.

Most of these robots are still in the development stage. In testing out the Tertill, we see that it has great potential, but as you can see in the video, there are some weeds that it misses. We’ll suggest that the designers raise the crop sensors while lowering the weed trimmer so that it controls a wider range of weeds. Hopefully after these tweaks it will be ready for prime time!

Involved in this project are:

Bryan Brown, Integrated Weed Management Specialist, NYSIPM, Cornell University

Kristine Averill, Research Associate, Soil and Crop Sciences, Cornell University

Antonio DiTommaso, Professor and Chair, Soil and Crop Sciences, Cornell University

Scott Morris, Research Technician, Soil and Crop Sciences, Cornell University

 

 

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