New York State IPM Program

August 28, 2020
by Dan Olmstead
Comments Off on Severe weather causes intense rain and wind across NY

Severe weather causes intense rain and wind across NY

Severe weather outbreaks yesterday caused intense wind and rain for prolonged periods across New York State. Significant rainfall and strong winds were recorded, with tornado warnings issued downstate in the Hudson Valley.

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August 27, 2020
by Dan Olmstead
Comments Off on Enhanced risk of severe thunderstorms for central NY, Catskills and Hudson Valley

Enhanced risk of severe thunderstorms for central NY, Catskills and Hudson Valley

The National Weather Service predicts slight to enhanced risk of severe thunderstorms across large portions of New York State for Thursday 27 Aug 2020.

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July 27, 2020
by Dan Olmstead
Comments Off on Drought worsens in Northern New York

Drought worsens in Northern New York

Severe drought has developed in northern New York along the St. Lawrence Seaway as of 21 July, according to the National Drought Mitigation Center. Conditions throughout the northeast and New England have generally become drier in recent weeks but an extended pattern of particularly low rainfall along the northern New York border is cause for growing concern. Click here for full list of impacted areas are listed alphabetically by county and township.

Towns in northern New York experiencing moderate to severe drought conditions according to the National Drought Mitigation Center as of 21 July 2020.

Towns in northern New York experiencing moderate to severe drought conditions according to the National Drought Mitigation Center as of 21 July 2020.

Below-average rainfall

90-day rainfall totals north of Canton and Potsdam are between 3 and 4 inches which is well-below ‘Normal‘ expected rainfall for this region and period of time during the season.

Map of 90-day rainfall totals in northern New York between 20 May and 21 July 2020.

Map of 90-day rainfall totals in northern New York between 20 May and 21 July 2020.

Drought Programs and Assistance

USDA has programs to help farmers and small businesses dealing with persistent drought. If you are being impacted in northern NY, click here to learn about available programs and resources.

This article is posted by the Network for Environment and Weather Applications (NEWA) which is part of the New York State Integrated Pest Management Program in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences at Cornell University.

July 13, 2020
by Dan Olmstead
Comments Off on Noteworthy rainfall across New York State this past weekend

Noteworthy rainfall across New York State this past weekend

Two major systems brought significant amounts of rain to all of New York State this past weekend. Tropical Storm Fay moved up the Hudson River Valley while a large front from the West hit western and central NY Saturday and Sunday.

7-day rainfall totals for New York State as of 12 July 2020. Data provided by the National Weather Service Advance Hyrologic Prediction Service.

7-day rainfall totals for New York State as of 12 July 2020.

Most counties and townships received a minimum half inch of rain across the state, which was timely given the fact that most of NY had transitioned to abnormally dry conditions, or moderate to severe drought in some areas, as of 10 July. Click here for additional drought status information.

More than 3 inches of rain were recorded in Catteraugus, Lewis, Madison, Oneida, Onondaga, Orange, Oswego, Rockland, Sullivan, and Westchester Counties as well as all boroughs of New York City. Smaller areas of Livingston, Monroe, Ontario, Seneca, and Yates Counties also received similar amounts.

Lumberland and Highland Townships in the southwest corner of Sullivan County may have experienced rainfall in excess of 8 inches.

In the future, visit the ThinkIPM Blog for summaries of severe weather events impacting IPM practices and agricultural production in NY.

Rainfall data provided by the National Weather Service Advance Hydrologic Prediction Service.

This report was provided by the Network for Environment and Weather Applications (NEWA) which is part of the New York State Integrated Pest Management Program in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences at Cornell University.

February 12, 2020
by Debra E. Marvin
Comments Off on The Soybean and Small Grains Congress

The Soybean and Small Grains Congress

On February 5th and 6th, Bryan Brown and Jaime Cummings of the NYSIPM Program presented their latest findings to the farmers, agricultural consultants and agribusiness associates attending the Soybean and Small Grains Congress meetings in Batavia, NY and Waterloo, NY.

Photo of Jaime Cummings speaking to audience

Field Crops and Livestock IPM Coordinator Jaime Cummings

This event was sponsored by the Northwest Dairy, livestock and Field Crops Team, an outstanding regional agriculture program from Cornell Cooperative Extension serving a nine-county region in western New York. The team’s specialists work together with Cornell faculty and extension educators statewide to provide service to the farms large and small whether dairy, livestock, hay, corn, wheat or soybean focused. They are part of the Cornell CALS’ Pro-Dairy program outreach.

map of New York with the NWNY Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Team Counties shown in red.

Caption: NWNY Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Team counties

On Wednesday, February 5th, the meeting took place in Batavia. Besides NYSIPM staff, presenters included Mike Stanyard (CCE NYNY Team), Dennis Pennington (Small Grains Specialist from Michigan State University), Gary Bergstrom (Cornell University Plant Pathologist), Jodi Putnam (Field Crops Specialist from CCE), Mike Helms (Pesticide Management Education Program, Cornell University), and Dan Wixted, (Pesticide Management Education Program, Cornell University). With such experienced trainers as these, attendees heard valuable information that will serve them well once the 2020 field season begins.

Bryan Brown shared his recent research trial on managing waterhemp in soybeans. Effective Programs for Controlling Waterhemp in Soybeans

Photo show Bryan Brown speaking to the audience

Dr. Bryan Brown speaks about his work reducing weeds in soybeans.

Jaime Cummings presented her research survey results on biocontrol use of a parasitoid on the cereal leaf beetle. Cereal Leaf Beetle: History, Biology, Management and Biocontrol

On Thursday, February 6th, the same team of presenters spoke to an audience in Waterloo, NY.

Congratulations Northwest New York Dairy, Livestock & Field Crops Team. Their educational programs and individual assistance cover a wide area of best management practices and as well as dairy farm business. For dairy farms, a bilingual dairy specialist provides producers with employee training and human resource facilitation in Spanish. Educational and support venues range from on individual farm management team meetings and troubleshooting to multi-day classroom and hands-on training and from ongoing farmer group discussion meetings to thematic day long symposia.

As to the success of this year’s S&SG Congress?  Mike Stanyard shared this: I want to thank all of you for making the 2020 S&SG Congresses a success!  It was a very well-rounded program and I have received plenty of comments about the quality of the presentations.  I know the growers took home some very valuable information.

Photo of Mike Stanyard of Cornell.

Mike Stanyard (Ph.D.) CCE, NWNY Dairy, Livestock & Field Crops Team

Photos: Ken Wise

December 31, 2019
by Joellen Lampman
Comments Off on NYS IPM’s Best of 2019

NYS IPM’s Best of 2019

“None of us is as smart as all of us.” –Ken Blanchard

Each year, NYS IPM staff are busy blogging about relevant topics. Here’s a recap of some of our more popular 2019 offerings:

ThinkIPM is our catchall blog and a great way to keep a pulse on what’s happening in New York State IPM.

Blacklegged tick embedded behind knee

No one wants to find an embedded tick.

We have spent a lot of time in the past year talking about how to prevent tick bites, from dressing in long pants, using repellents, and conducting daily tick checks. But sometimes one gets past you and you discover that new lump behind your knee has legs. There are always question about what to do next, and Help! I found a tick on me! was the most popular 2019 blog post.

distribution map as of November 2019

Spotted lanternfly distribution map as of November 2019

Spotted lanternfly was also on your mind, and Traveling for the Holidays? provided a checklist for those traveling within the spotted lanternfly quarantine zone. Trust us when we say that you do not want to unintentionally transport Spotted Lanternfly egg masses in New York state.

 

Other IPM Blogs – Besides ThinkIPM, we have more dedicated blogs, and you don’t need to be a specialist to subscribe to them. Here are some of the more popular posts:

We would all like the fruits and vegetables we purchase to be free of critters, and the Spotted Wing Drosophila blog post Managing SWD in raspberries & blackberries helps producers do just that.

 

The most popular Biocontrol Bytes offering was a guest post from our collegues in the Cornell’s School of Integrative Plant Science, section of Plant Pathology and Plant-Microbe Biology, Anna Wallis, Kerik Cox, and Mei-Wah Cho. They discussed moving beyond antibiotics to the use of biopesticides in the post, Battling Fire Blight with Biologicals.

Readers of the The ABCs of School and Childcare Pest Management blog were itching to read about poison ivy in the blog post, Poison Ivy – Don’t scratch.

One of the benefits of blogs is the ability to provide timely information, such as the Your NEWA Blog’s most popular Spring is coming – tune up your weather stations post.

It’s been a nippy end of the autumn, so we expect the Winter Injury Spring 2019 post in the Tree Integrated Pest Management blog to remain relevant.

Not much grows in the winter in NY, unless you have a greenhouse! The Ornamental Crops IPM Blog’s popular Greenhouse IPM update 2.5.19 cover mold and biocontrol efforts that can occur in February.

So, we hope keeping up with NYS IPM Program will be included amongst your resolutions. We wish you a very happy New Year and look forward to serving you in 2020 and beyond.

August 5, 2019
by Debra E. Marvin
Comments Off on NEW PEST = NEW PEST PAGE

NEW PEST = NEW PEST PAGE

Looking for information on that tick that recently killed 5 cows in North Carolina? The Asian Longhorned Tick is also in NY and may threaten our dairy and livestock industries. Thanks to NYSIPM’s Field Crops and Livestock team, we welcome you to visit our new page to learn more about this serious pest and learn where you can get livestock ticks identified.

As much as we enjoy doing what we do at the NYS Integrated Pest Management Program, there are already plenty of pests to go around. Unfortunately, here’s our newest one found on our  INVASIVES page:  ASIAN LONGHORNED TICK. Haemaphysalis longicornis; ALT.

**Look for the NYS IPM booth at Empire Farm Days for more information or conversation about this tick and how it may affect your farm.

ALT is a special concern to livestock farmers!

greatly magnified photo of Asian Longhorned Tick.

Mouthparts of Asian longhorned tick collected in Hudson Valley, NY by drag cloth. Ventral view. Photo Credit: Matt Frye, NYS IPM Program

Note: If you’re looking for long horns on this tick’s head, you’ll be disappointed. The common name is thought to come from either the spiky points on the tick’s scutum (aka shoulders), or from the points on the side of the head.

Acronyms abound in all parts of our lives. In our ‘business’, common names can be strikingly similar (Spotted Wing Drosophila, SWD, or Spotted Lanternfly, SLF) (Asian Longhorned Tick, Asian Longhorned Beetle) (Black-legged Tick, BLT, Longhorned Tick, ALT, Lone Star Tick, LST).  Hopefully by now you know IPM as Integrated Pest Management.

Biology

  • One parthenogenic female (reproduces without males) can produce hundreds or thousands of offspring
  • Cold temperature tolerance creates potential for establishment in the northeast
  • Broad host range – but prefers cattle
  • Attaching to birds and wildlife allow ALT to spread quickly over an increasing area
  • Preferred habitat:  pastures, meadows
asian longhorned tick
Asian longhorned tick, Haemaphysalis longicornis 
Asian longhorned tick has short mouthparts similar to the dog tick, but its lack of any white mottling helps identify it.

Distribution

  • Native to Eastern Asia, invasive ALT became the highly problematic ‘cattle tick’ on Australia and New Zealand livestock
  • Since the 2017 discovery in New Jersey, it’s now in New York and many Northeastern states

map showing New York counties in which asian longhorned tick has been found

Impact: ALT damages livestock health and impairs milk production

  • Severe infestation causes anemia or death from blood loss
  • ALT feeding can transmit bovine theileriosis and parasites that cause babesiosis
  • Theileriosis can significantly reduce milk production and kill calves
sheep's ear infested with asian longhorned ticks
Closeup of ear from a 12-year-old female Icelandic sheep supporting all life stages of Haemaphysalis longicornis in Hunterdon County, NJ.

Management

  • Monitor livestock regularly for ticks – collect and submit suspicious ticks for identification
  • Typical tick insecticide treatments—ear tags, sprays, dips, pour-ons and powders—are effective against ALT
cattle with calves, many have ear tags
Livestock on pasture are particularly vulnerable to tick infestations. Check pastured animals regularly.

IPM for livestock ticks

  • Inspect animals regularly for ticks
  • When indicated, use timely application of insecticides
  • Minimize tick habitat in pasture and feedlots by keeping grasses and weeds trimmed
  • Pasture rotation
  • Deer exclusion limits re-introduction of ticks from wildlife
  • Chickens and guinea fowl in pastures eat adult ticks, but typically not nymphs
  • Opossums eat vast amounts of ticks

Consider following our WEBSITE, THINK IPM BLOG, FACEBOOK PAGE, FLICKR, or TWITTER to access all the latest news not only on this invasive pest but all our activities: 

IPM is as broad as our selection of photos. On farms, vineyards, orchards; in schools, nursing homes, playgrounds; in your own home, lawn, or garden—IPM is foundational to sound, careful, economical ways of dealing with pests.

Our Mission: The New York State Integrated Pest Management Program develops sustainable ways to manage pests and helps people to use methods that minimize environmental, health, and economic risks.

 

 

June 17, 2019
by Debra E. Marvin
Comments Off on Dairy Fly IPM Demonstrations

Dairy Fly IPM Demonstrations

Red barn at Shunpike Dairy

Post by Ken Wise, Livestock & Field Crops IPM Extension Area Educator

We have set up two dairy fly IPM summer-long demonstrations. The demonstrations are in Essex and Dutchess Counties. Along with Jennifer Fimbel (Dutchess County Cornell Extension Educator) and Carly Summers (Essex County Cornell Extension Educator), we have set up two summer long demonstration with Shunpike Dairy   and North Country Creamery  Dairy.

There are several species of flies that cause cattle problems and we break them into two categories: barn flies and pasture flies. In the barn we have stable flies (biting) and house flies (non-biting), and on pasture we have stable flies (biting), horn flies (biting), face flies (non-biting), horse flies (biting) and deer flies (biting).

Photo of public area in front of North Country Creamery

Barn Flies: Both house and stable flies reproduce and develop in moist, rotting organic matter. This includes moist hay, straw, manure, feed or any rotting material in contact with the ground (soil or concrete). Stable flies need to take blood meals to reproduce. These flies like to bite the legs of the animals. Houseflies do not bite but can occur at high numbers. They annoy the animals and can transmit various diseases.

Keeping areas around the barn clear of this organic matter reduces barn fly issues dramatically. BUT…Even while keeping barns clean, these flies can still become problematic as the summer progresses.

The use of biological control can help keep populations lower if you start in the early summer. Releasing specific parasitoids around the barns works like smart bombs by laying eggs inside of the pupa of stable and house flies. They hatch and will eat the pupa before it can an adult fly. There are many types of fly traps that can be employed to control barn flies. You can purchase parasitoids for weekly releases from IPM Labs .

We have set up several fly traps for demonstration to aid in controlling these flies in or around the barns to monitor fly populations and efficacy of the various traps for the summer.

PRO SERIES SPIDERWEB™ FLY GLUE TRAP (AKA Giant Glue Trap) (house flies and some possible stable flies)

A photo of a wide sticky tape placed across ceiling of dairy barn

Knight Stick (stable flies are attracted to a blue spectrum of light that is reflected)

 photo shows a device similar in shape to a large flashlight and suspended outdoors to draw flies away from livestock

Olsen Biting Fly Trap  (stable flies are attracted to a blue spectrum of light that is reflected)

Photo shows a large round cylinder up right like a large water pipe. The surface is sticky and many flies are stuck to it. It's placed outside on the ground.

Insecticides can be used in the barn if threshold levels have been met or exceeded. Place 3 by 5-inch spot cards in different areas of the barn where flies congregate. When houseflies rest they regurgitate their food and leave a spot on the wall, or in this case the card.  If a card receives 100 spots per card per week, it has reached the action threshold. Make every attempt to find where the flies are breeding and reproducing and eliminate the moist organic matter. If there is still a problem, and only as a last resort, an insecticide can be used.  (Make sure you read and follow the insecticide label before use)

Pasture Flies: While stable flies breed in moist organic matter horn and face flies reproduce in fresh cow pats. Within a minute or so, after a cow defecates, the flies lay eggs in the pat. Horn flies live 90 percent of the time on cattle and need blood to reproduce. Each fly can take 20 blood meals a day. That is a lot of biting on the animals. Face flies feed on secretions from the animal around the eyes and nose.  They will also feed on a wound or cut. Face flies also transmit pink eye and infect animals with a nematode eye worm (Thelasia sp.). Horn flies can be controlled with a walk through trap (Bruce Trap) or a Cow Vac. A second method is to drag a light harrow to spread out the manure pat and make it thin and dry out. This will kill the fly maggots in the manure pat.

Walk through trap (Bruce Trap)

This photo shows a screened in passageway outside, large enough for cattle to pass through. Text on the photo says Horn and faceflies do not like enclosures and fly off toward lights near the outer netting and are trapped.

Cow Vac

Photo shows a sturdy passageway with a motor on top that acts as a vacuum as cows pass through the enclosed passageway.

The flies can also be controlled with insecticides if certain thresholds have been met.  The threshold for face fly is an average of 10 flies per face across the herd and horn fly is an average of 50 per side of the animal. Note that horn flies are ½ the size of the house fly, and feed on the back, side or belly of the cattle.  The threshold for stable flies in the barn or on pasture is an average of 10 flies per 4 legs. You will need to monitor about 15 animals in the herd to determine thresholds.

This photo shows another angle of the cow vacuum passageway.

There are also horse and deer flies (both biting flies) that can feed on cattle. While they occur to a lesser degree that other cattle flies they do take blood meals and are very painful. They reproduce in wet areas in and around forests. They will land on the cattle, take blood and leave in seconds. This is why insecticides do not work on these two biting flies, because there is not enough exposure to the insecticide. We set up two traps that catch stable, horse and deer flies on each farm.

H-Trap

This photo shows an outdoor trap that is suspended on a curved pole. The trap is a very large black ball with a netted, peaked canopy over it. Flies are attracted to the black ball and then fly up into the netted trap.

Horse Pal Trap

This photos shows the Horsepal trap. Similar to the H trap, it is set outdoors and consists of a large black ball covered with a tented canopy that traps flies as they fly up from the ball.

We will host field meetings in association with the demonstrations during which we will demonstrate and discuss IPM for flies on cattle and general pasture management. Meeting dates will be posted soon.

Ken Wise, Livestock & Field Crops IPM Extension Area Educator New York State Integrated Pest Management Program, 2715 U.S. 44, Millbrook, NY 12545

Photo of Jaime Cummings

Jaime Cummings, Field Crops and Livestock IPM Coordinator
524 Bradfield Hall, Cornell University, Ithaca NY, 14853

March 6, 2019
by Debra E. Marvin
Comments Off on An #IPM Field Trip

An #IPM Field Trip

Recently, our Livestock & Field Crops IPM Extension Area Educator, Ken Wise did a guest lecture in the Cornell IPM class taught by Dr. Toni DiTomasso and Dr. John Losey.  But Ken didn’t only stand in front of the chalkboard (or white board); he did a hands-on lecture on fly pest management at the new teaching dairy facility near campus.

Forty or so student were present for the educational tour which happened to coincide with a very recent birth.

Livestock & Field Crops Coordinator Jaime Cummings was along: “Ken shared his 20 years of experience in livestock IPM education with Cornell undergrads on identifying and managing fly pests. Students showed their interest with many good questions and were excited at the opportunity to tour the teaching dairy facility, where the calves were a big hit in drumming up interest in NY dairy production!”

For more on Dairy fly management, the NYSIPM Program has a full list of video playlists including LIVESTOCK IPM.

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