Greening in the Red Zone- Now Available

Greening in the Red Zone: Disaster, Resilience and Community Greening a book edited by Keith Tidball and Marianne Krasny is now available for purchase through the Springer website.

Here is the description of the book from Springer:

  • Makes a first foray into the intriguing and potentially important field of “greening”
  • Paints a comprehensive picture of how greening might be useful after major disasters
  • Gathers renowned experts and practitioners from around the world

Creation and access to green spaces promotes individual human health, especially in therapeutic contexts among those suffering traumatic events. But what of the role of access to green space and the act of creating and caring for such places in promoting social health and well-being? Greening in the Red Zone asserts that creation and access to green spaces confers resilience and recovery in systems disrupted by violent conflict or disaster. This edited volume provides evidence for this assertion through cases and examples. The contributors to this volume use a variety of research and policy frameworks to explore how creation and access to green spaces in extreme situations might contribute to resistance, recovery, and resilience of social-ecological systems.

This book takes important steps in advancing understanding of what makes communi­ties bounce back from disaster or violent conflict. The authors’ findings that creating and caring for green space contributes positively to recovery and resilience add to the toolkit of those working in disaster and conflict zones. W. C. Banks, Director, Institute for National Security and Counterterrorism, Syracuse University

Greening in the Red Zone is a highly relevant book. At a time when society is more separated than ever from the natural world, it offers additional reasons why our ongoing experience of nature is essential for the human body, mind and spirit. This book is both instructive and inspiring. S. R. Kellert, Tweedy Ordway Professor Emeritus, Senior Research Scholar, Yale University

This is a fascinating book that greatly elevates our understanding of how the perspective of humans as an integrated part of nature may contribute to the resilience discourse. I warmly recommend this book to anyone interested in how we may prepare ourselves for an increasingly uncertain future. T. Elmqvist, Department of Systems Ecology and Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University

Greening in the Red Zone is an important contribution to science and security policy and practice. This edited volume provides unique and novel approaches from a participatory, transparent, ecosystem-based perspective that puts those affected by disasters and conflict into positions of empowerment rather than weakness and dependency. This book is an interesting and timely contribution. C. Ferguson, President, Federation of American Scientists

Keith Tidball to design, build, and research “healing spaces”

Keith Tidball is co-principle investigator on a project to build Open Spaces Sacred Places (OSSPs) in Joplin, Mo., and New York City. “The OSSPs will be nodes on the landscape where people can connect to values [of natural elements for healing after a disaster], and these places will become portals where people can reconnect with nature,” said Tidball.

rendering

The “Landscapes of Resilience” project recently received a $585,000 National Open Spaces Sacred Places award. This five-year grant will go towards building and studying healing spaces for residents recovering from the May 2011 Joplin tornado and Hurricane Sandy.

For further reading, please see this article from the Cornell Chronicle.

2011 Global Environmental Action Conference Tokyo, Japan

Sr. Extension Associate Keith Tidball was invited to present at the GEA International Conference 2011 entitled Building Sustainable Societies through Reconstruction, Working with the International Community for Regenerating Japan,” held in Tokyo, Japan on 14th and 15th of October, 2011. The Conference was opened with the attendance of H.I.H Crown Prince, Naruhito, GEA Chairman, Mr. Juro Saito and Mr.Yoshihiko Noda Prime Minister of Japan. Director-General of GEA, Ms. Wakako Hironaka presided over the Conference as its Chair. Sr Extension Associate Keith Tidball.

Japan’s Crown Prince Naruhito

Japan’s Prime Minister Noda

Keith  Tidball of Cornell University Civic  Ecology Lab and NY EDEN

The conference was organized by the Global Environmental Action (GEA) supported by the Government of Japan, namely, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Ministry of Finance, Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science, and Technology, Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries, Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry, Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism, and Ministry of the Environment. The Conference aimed to undertake a high-level policy dialogue in order to articulate concrete measures to realize sustainable societies not only in Japan, but also in the international community, capitalizing on Japan’s experience of the recent earthquake, tsunami, and nuclear disasters.

NY EDEN Responds to Recent Flooding Disasters

Cornell Cooperative Extension (CCE)’s NY Extension Disaster Education Network (EDEN) actively assisted the residents of at least 33 New York counties, during the “prodromal” stages of the recent hurricane and tropical storm, Irene and Lee.

When it was clear that there would be a crisis due to flooding, NY EDEN notified the counties and disseminated information about how to proceed. They “ensure[d] that timely information and regular communication were deployed such that loss of life was minimized.”

Read more about the crucial role that NY EDEN had in responding to the floods in this article.