Tag Archives: invasive species

Upcoming Events: Online Gardening Classes

Looking for an online gardening class?

Check out these classes being offered by Cornell Cooperative Extensions around the state.

Click on the topic to see what classes are being offered.

 

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Upcoming Events: Online Gardening Classes

Looking for an online gardening class?

Check out these classes being offered by Cornell Cooperative Extensions around the state.

Click on the topic to see what classes are being offered.

Composting

Two hands holding finished compostMagic of Compost

Tuesday, August 18, 2020
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Suffolk County

Three large compost bins, one made of wire fencing and two made of palletsMagic of Compost

Tuesday, September 8, 2020
7:00 PM – 8:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Suffolk County

Two hands holding finished compostMagic of Compost

Saturday, September 26, 2020
10:00 AM – 11:00 AM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Suffolk County

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Famous Gardens

Downton AbbeyThe Gardens of Downton Abbey

Wednesday, August 12, 2020
11:00 AM – 12:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Suffolk County

The High Line Garden in NYC in the spring with pink flowering treesThe High Line: Lessons for Gardeners

Tuesday, August 25, 2020
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Suffolk County

The High Line Garden in NYC in the spring with pink flowering treesGardening Tips from the High Line

Thursday, September 17, 2020
11:00 AM – 12:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Suffolk County

The High Line Garden in NYC in the spring with pink flowering treesThe High Line: Lessons for your Garden

Wednesday, October 7, 2020
11:00 AM – 12:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Suffolk County

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Gardening for Birds

Hummingbird feeding from a red flowerHummingbirds in your Garden

Tuesday, August 25, 2020
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Suffolk County

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Gardening with Pets

German Shepherd sitting in the lawn infron of a peony plant with large magenta blossomsPet Friendly Plants

Thursday, September 3, 2020
12:00 PM – 12:45 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Genessee County

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Healing Gardens

A stone path running through the APline Gardne full of color and textureHealing Gardens

Thursday, August 13, 2020
6:30 pm – 7: 30 pm
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Broome County

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Insects

Yellow beetle with black spotsGarden Insect ID & Organic Controls

Wednesday, August 12, 2020
6:30 PM – 8:30 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Tompkins County

Monarch Buttery Presentation

Tuesday, August 18, 2020
7:00 PM – 8:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Monroe County

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Invasive Plants

FOur-petaled white flowers on a garlic mustard plantInvasive Species

Thursday, August 20, 2020
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Warren County

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Lawns

Close up of lush green grasLawns Love Fall

Thursday, August 13, 2020
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Suffolk County

Close up of lush green grasLawns Love Fall

Thursday, August 13, 2020
7:00 PM – 8:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Suffolk County

Close up of lush green grasLawns Love Fall

Wednesday, August 26, 2020
7:00 PM – 8:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Suffolk County

Close up of lush green grasLawns Love Fall

Monday, August 31, 2020
7:00 PM – 8:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Suffolk County

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Ornamentals

Blue HydrangeasHydrangeas

Tuesday, August 18, 2020
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Suffolk County

FOur-petaled white flowers on a garlic mustard plantInvasive Species

Thursday, August 20, 2020
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Warren County

German Shepherd sitting in the lawn infron of a peony plant with large magenta blossomsPet Friendly Plants

Thursday, September 3, 2020
12:00 PM – 12:45 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Genessee County

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Pest Management

Yellow beetle with black spotsGarden Insect ID & Organic Controls

Wednesday, August 12, 2020
6:30 PM – 8:30 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Tompkins County

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Soil

Light purple clover flower against a background of green leavesCover Crops for the Home Garden

Wednesday, August 26, 2020
6:30 PM – 8:30 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Tompkins County

A trowel stuck in a raised garden bedSecrets of Soil

Tuesday, October 6, 2020
7:00 PM – 8:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Suffolk County

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Vegetable Gardening

Five freshly harvested heads of garlicGrowing Great Garlic

Wednesday, August 19, 2020
6:30 PM – 7:30 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Broome County

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Upcoming Events: Online Gardening Classes

Looking for an online gardening class?

Check out these classes being offered by Cornell Cooperative Extensions around the state.

Click on the topic to see what classes are being offered.

Composting

Two hands holding finished compostMagic of Compost

Tuesday, August 18, 2020
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Suffolk County

Three large compost bins, one made of wire fencing and two made of palletsMagic of Compost

Tuesday, September 8, 2020
7:00 PM – 8:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Suffolk County

Two hands holding finished compostMagic of Compost

Saturday, September 26, 2020
10:00 AM – 11:00 AM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Suffolk County

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Edible Plants

Red and green tomatoes on a tomato plant Plants and Backyard Farm

Monday, August 3, 2020
10:30 AM – 11:15 AM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Suffolk County

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Famous Gardens

Downton AbbeyThe Gardens of Downton Abbey

Wednesday, August 12, 2020
11:00 AM – 12:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Suffolk County

The High Line Garden in NYC in the spring with pink flowering treesThe High Line: Lessons for Gardeners

Tuesday, August 25, 2020
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Suffolk County

The High Line Garden in NYC in the spring with pink flowering treesGardening Tips from the High Line

Thursday, September 17, 2020
11:00 AM – 12:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Suffolk County

The High Line Garden in NYC in the spring with pink flowering treesThe High Line: Lessons for your Garden

Wednesday, October 7, 2020
11:00 AM – 12:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Suffolk County

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Gardening for Birds

Hummingbird feeding from a red flowerHummingbirds in your Garden

Tuesday, August 25, 2020
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Suffolk County

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Healing Gardens

A stone path running through the APline Gardne full of color and textureHealing Gardens

Thursday, August 13, 2020
6:30 pm – 7: 30 pm
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Broome County

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Insects

Swallow Tail Butterfly, yellow and black, feed ing off pink flowersInsects

Tuesday, August 4, 2020
2:00 PM – 2:45 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Suffolk County

Monarch Buttery PresentationBlack and orange Monarch Butterfly feeding on a purple flower

Thursday, August 6, 2020
7:00 PM – 8:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Monroe County

Yellow beetle with black spotsGarden Insect ID & Organic Controls

Wednesday, August 12, 2020
6:30 PM – 8:30 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Tompkins County

Monarch Buttery Presentation

Tuesday, August 18, 2020
7:00 PM – 8:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Monroe County

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Invasive Plants

FOur-petaled white flowers on a garlic mustard plantInvasive Species

Thursday, August 20, 2020
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Warren County

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Lawns

Close up of lush green grasLawns Love Fall

Tuesday, August 4, 2020
7:00 PM – 8:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Suffolk County

Close up of lush green grasLawns Love Fall

Thursday, August 13, 2020
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Suffolk County

Close up of lush green grasLawns Love Fall

Thursday, August 13, 2020
7:00 PM – 8:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Suffolk County

Close up of lush green grasLawns Love Fall

Wednesday, August 26, 2020
7:00 PM – 8:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Suffolk County

Close up of lush green grasLawns Love Fall

Monday, August 31, 2020
7:00 PM – 8:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Suffolk County

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Ornamentals

A vegetable garden with a combination of cabbage surrounded by small yellow and orange flowers and dark purple leafy greensAugust – What to do in the Garden this Month

Wednesday, August 5, 2020
6:30 PM – 8:30 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Tompkins County

Shade GardeningSahde garden with two large containers of blooming hostas

Thursday, August 6, 2020
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Warren County

Blue HydrangeasHydrangeas

Tuesday, August 18, 2020
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Suffolk County

FOur-petaled white flowers on a garlic mustard plantInvasive Species

Thursday, August 20, 2020
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Warren County

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Pest Management

Yellow beetle with black spotsGarden Insect ID & Organic Controls

Wednesday, August 12, 2020
6:30 PM – 8:30 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Tompkins County

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Poisonous Plants

What Evil Lurks in the Heart of Your Garden?

Wednesday, August 5, 2020
7:00 PM – 8:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Orange County

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Soil

Light purple clover flower against a background of green leavesCover Crops for the Home Garden

Wednesday, August 26, 2020
6:30 PM – 8:30 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Tompkins County

A trowel stuck in a raised garden bedSecrets of Soil

Tuesday, October 6, 2020
7:00 PM – 8:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Suffolk County

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Vegetable Gardening

Red and green tomatoes on a tomato plant Plants and Backyard Farm

Monday, August 3, 2020
10:30 AM – 11:15 AM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Suffolk County

Raised Garden bed with Cabbage, kael and lettuce, fitted with tubbing to for row coverPlanting Fall Vegetables

Wednesday, August 5, 2020
6:30 PM – 7:30 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Broome County

A vegetable garden with a combination of cabbage surrounded by small yellow and orange flowers and dark purple leafy greensAugust – What to do in the Garden this Month

Wednesday, August 5, 2020
6:30 PM – 8:30 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Tompkins County

Six heads of large heasd of green and red leetuce grwoing in a raised garden bedRaised Bed Gardening

Thursday, August 6, 2020
7:00 PM – 8:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Monroe County

Five freshly harvested heads of garlicGrowing Great Garlic

Wednesday, August 19, 2020
6:30 PM – 7:30 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Broome County

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Upcoming Events: Online Gardening Classes

Looking for an online gardening class?

Check out these classes being offered by Cornell Cooperative Extensions around the state.

Click on the topic to see what classes are being offered.

Container Gardening

 Large green pot with a plant with pink flowere, a short plant with white flowers and a varigated plant spilling over the sideContainer Gardening

Monday, May 11, 2020
4:00 PM – 5:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Onondaga County

A short wooden tub set next to a tree overflowing with plants: a tall grass with red leaves, a bright green plant with white veins and a dark purple plant spilling over the edge.Creative Container Gardening

Wednesday, May 13, 2020
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Tompkins County

A small child in a jean shirt, teal skirt and bright yellow rain boots put seeds in the groundSeed Starting and Container Gardening with Kids

Thursday, May 14, 2020
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Warren County

A short wooden tub set next to a tree overflowing with plants: a tall grass with red leaves, a bright green plant with white veins and a dark purple plant spilling over the edge.Creative Container Gardening

Wednesday, May 27, 2020
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Tompkins County

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Composting

Pile of kitchen scraps, mostly peels of various fruits and vegetables, spead out on top of a compost pileHome Composting

Monday, May 11, 2020
1:00 PM – 2:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Jefferson County

Full Wooden Compost BinComposting

Monday, May 18, 2020
4:00 PM – 5:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Onondaga County

Two hands holding finished compostBuilding Soil and Composting

Tuesday, May 19, 2020
5:00 PM – 6:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Chenango County

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Fruit

Quince Tree with two large green quince fruit - almost apple like in shapeFruit 102: Growing Unusual Fruits: An Introduction to Unfamiliar Fruits

Monday, May 11, 2020
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Steuben County

Two small light green fruits (pawpaws) growing of a branchGrowing Unusual Fruits

Wednesday, May 20, 2020
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Tompkins County

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Gardening with Kids

A small child in a jean shirt, teal skirt and bright yellow rain boots put seeds in the groundSeed Starting and Container Gardening with Kids

Thursday, May 14, 2020
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Warren County

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Herb Gardening

Bright Green Herb Plants - Chives, Basil, ParsleyGrowing Culinary Herbs

Wednesday, May 20, 2020
6:30 pm
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Broome County

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Insects

Spotted Lanternfly adult on a green stemSpotted Lanternfly Workshop

Wednesday, May 13, 2020
9:30 AM – 12:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Ulster County

Close-up of a leaf cutting bee on a yellow flowerPollinator Gardens

Monday, May 18, 2020
1:00 PM – 2:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extensions
Jefferson County

Yellow beetle with black spotsPest and Disease Management

Tuesday, May 26, 2020
5:00 PM – 6:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Chenango County

Swallow Tail Butterfly, yellow and black, feed ing off pink flowersCreating a Butterfly Garden

Monday, May 27, 2020
6:30 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extensions
Broome County

Green lacewing - green bodied bug with large net-like wings sitting on a flower with pink petals and a yellow centerAll About Bugs: pollinators and more!

Thursday, May 28, 2020
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Warren County

Squash bug adult laying eggsGarden Pests

Thursday, May 28, 2020
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Madison County

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Invasive Species

Spotted Lanternfly adult on a green stemSpotted Lanternfly Workshop

Wednesday, May 13, 2020
9:30 AM – 12:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Ulster County

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Pest Management

A hand how and a gloved hand pulling weedsWeed Identification and Management

Tuesday, May 19, 2020
6:30 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Broome County

A pair of gloved hands holding some freshly picked weedsGarden Weeds

Thursday, May 21, 2020
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Madison County

Yellow beetle with black spotsPest and Disease Management

Tuesday, May 26, 2020
5:00 PM – 6:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Chenango County

Squash bug adult laying eggsGarden Pests

Thursday, May 28, 2020
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Madison County

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Pollinators

Close-up of a leaf cutting bee on a yellow flowerPollinator Gardens

Monday, May 18, 2020
1:00 PM – 2:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extensions
Jefferson County

Swallow Tail Butterfly, yellow and black, feed ing off pink flowersCreating a Butterfly Garden

Monday, May 27, 2020
6:30 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extensions
Broome County

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Soil

Two hands holding finished compostBuilding Soil and Composting

Tuesday, May 19, 2020
5:00 PM – 6:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Chenango County

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Technology as a Gardening Tool

Taking a picture of a field of flowers with a smart phoneUsing Your Cell Phone as a Gardening Tool

Wednesday, May 20, 2020
6:30 PM – 8:30 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Orange County

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Vegetable Gardening

Assortment of heirloom vegetables on a blanket - tomatoes of various sizes, sizes colors and shapes, hote egg plants, a cucumber, a purple pepper, a pile of green beans, a few foot long beansGrowing History: Planning an Heirloom Vegetable Garden

Monday, May 11, 2020
10:00 AM – 11:30 AM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Delaware County

A cucurbit seedling showing the two cotyledons and the first true leaf just starting to unfold.Planting a Vegetable Garden

Monday, May 11, 2020
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Chemung County

Pepper seedlings in tray of biodegradeable potsSeed Starting

Tuesday, May 12, 2020
5:00 PM – 6:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Chenango County

A small child in a jean shirt, teal skirt and bright yellow rain boots put seeds in the groundSeed Starting and Container Gardening with Kids

Thursday, May 14, 2020
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Warren County

A vegetable garden with a combination of cabbage surrounded by small yellow and orange flowers and dark purple leafy greensCaring for Your Vegetable Garden

Monday, May 18, 2020
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Chemung County

A cluster of cherry tomatoes growing on a tomato plant wet with the morning dew.Family Food Gardens for Beginners

Thursday, May 21, 2020
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Warren County

Pile of cucumbers, a red, yellow and green pepper, green onions, tomatoes, a bunch of parsley and a sprig of rosemaryHow Does Your Garden Grow Check-In

Thursday, June 11, 2020
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Madison County

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Weeds

A hand how and a gloved hand pulling weedsWeed Identification and Management

Tuesday, May 19, 2020
6:30 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Broome County

A pair of gloved hands holding some freshly picked weedsGarden Weeds

Thursday, May 21, 2020
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Madison County

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Pest Watch: Emerald Ash Borer

by Susan Ndiaye, Community Horticulture Educator

Close up of an ash tree in which the bark has fallen off leaving a light tan color area
Woodpecker damage on ash tree

Hopefully you’ve spent some time outside enjoying the beautiful spring weather we had last weekend.   Did you noticed any ash trees that look like they have been completely stripped of their bark?  Did you wonder what happened?  Did you think it was a disease, an insect or maybe a deer?  This damaged is actually caused by woodpeckers.  They are searching for emerald ash borer larvae which can be found just below the bark.

Slender shiny emerald green beetle with large black eyes standing on a leaf
Adult emerald ash borer

The emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis) is an shiny emerald-colored jewel beetle.  Native to Asia, it was first discovered in North America near Detroit, Michigan in 2002 (most likely hitching a ride here in solid wood packing materials used in the transportation of goods).

Despite its beauty, the emerald ash borer is an invasive insect and has killed hundreds of millions of ash trees throughout North America.  As of April 2020, it has been found in 35 states and 5 Canadian provinces costing municipalities, property owners, nursery operators and forestry product industries hundreds of millions of dollars.

Emerald Ash Borer Lifecycle as described in the textLifecycle

Emerald ash borers, like all beetles, undergo complete metamorphosis.  Usually in June and July, adult females lay 60-90 eggs on the bark of ash trees (Fraxinus spp.).  The eggs hatch and the larvae bore through the outer bark and begin feeding on the inner bark or phloem of the ash tree.  The larvae feed for several weeks growing to rough 1 to 1.25 inches in length.  The larvae then overwinter in the bark.  In the spring they pupate and finally in May and June emerge as adults and exit their host tree by creating a D-shaped whole in the bark.  The adults feed on the leaves of the ash tree, mate, and females lay eggs starting the cycle over.

Damage

As mentioned before, the larvae of the emerald ash borer feed on the inner bark or phloem of the ash tree.  The phloem is part of the vascular system of the plant and is responsible for transporting the sugars produced by photosynthesis in the leaves to the rest of tree.  Damage to the phloem cuts of the nutrient supply and eventually leads to the death of the tree.

An ashe tree with no leaves inthe canopy but lots of leafy shoots covering the trunk
Dying ash tree

One of the first symptoms produced by an emerald ash borer infestation is a thinning canopy.  With fewer leaves the tree’s ability to produce food through photosynthesis decreases and as a result the tree may produce lots of  shoots that sprout from the roots and trunk.  The leaves on these shoots are often larger than normal as the tree tries to compensate for its loss of photosynthetic capability.   The tree’s canopy will continue to thin eventually leaving the tree bare.

Many people do not notice that the canopy of their ash tree is thinning.  For many people, the first symptom that they notice is the woodpecker damage on the trunk.  At this point the tree is usually heavily infested by emerald ash borer and will soon succumb to the infestation.

Management

The emerald ash borer was first detected in New York State in 2009 over in  Cattaraugus County.   Two years later, in 2011, it was detected here in Orange County.  As of right now the majority of trees in Orange County have been infested by the emerald ash borer and are showing signs of decline or have died.   Once you notice that the canopy of your ash tree is thinning  there has already been extensive damage to the vascular system of the tree and even with treatment there is little chance of recovery.

Deciding whether or not to treat your ash tree is up to you.  The first thing to do is make sure you properly identify your tree.

Once you have properly identified your tree there are three option: cut it, treat it, or leave it.

Cut It

Ash trees that create a potential hazard (i.e. proximity to a building) need to be removed.   If you cannot safely remove the tree yourself,  look for a certified arborist near you at www.treesaregood.org.   Many ash trees are being turned into firewood.  Keep in mind that New York State law prohibits the movement of firewood more than 50 miles (linear distance) from its source, specifically to prevent the accidental movement of invasive species like the emerald ash borer.   Don’t Move Firewood!Dontmovefirewood.org

Treat It

Remember that that if you tree is already showing signs of decline it is probably too late to save it through treatment.

If you decide you want to treat your ash tree(s), it is not just a one time investment.  Most treatments only last one or two years before they wear off leaving the tree susceptible to infestation.  This means trees need to be treated ever couple years since at the moment the emerald ash borer looks like it is here to stay.

There are many insecticides on the market that are labeled for emerald ash borer.  Many of them need to be applied by a certified pesticide applicator.  If you are interested in protecting your ash tree(s) check out  Insecticide Options for Protecting Ash Trees from Emerald Ash Borer for more information.

Leave It

If your ash tree poses no potential hazard, consider leaving it.  Although the emerald ash borer has killed millions of ash trees here in North America, there is hope the identification of “lingering ash” or an ash that stays healthy after nearby trees have overwhelmingly succumbed to the emerald ash borer.  The identification of “lingering ash” could help achieve ash species conservation.   Click here to learn more about how you can become a citizen scientist with the Lingering Ash Search through the Monitoring and Managing Ash Program.Decision Tree integrating long-term conservation perspective: Cut it, Treat it, Leave it, Treat

Fun Facts
Biological Control

Although there are some predatory wasps that feed on emerald ash borers, the two avenues of biological control that have shown potential in being able to help manage populations of emerald ash borer are parasitoid wasps and entomopathogenic fungi.

parasitoid wasp
Parasitoid wasp (Spathius galinae)

Let’s start with the parasitoid wasps.  Three species of parasitoid wasps found in the emerald ash borer’s native range were were considered potential biological control agents.  These parasitoids are natural enemies of the emerald ash borer and have long ovipositors that allow them to drill into the ash trees and lay their eggs on the emerald ash borer larvae.  Once the eggs hatch the wasp larvae consume the emerald ash borer larvae alive.  (Note: In order to get permission to release these parasitoid wasps in the United Stated, it took four or five years of research to make sure that they  were host specific to emerald ash borer and wouldn’t impact any other similar species.)  Of the three species released, two are showing promise, although research is still being done regarding their dispersal, spread, and ability to overwinter.

Onto the entomopathogenic fungus, Beauveria bassiana.  When spores of this fungus come in contact with the emerald ash borer, they germinate and penetrate the cuticle of the insect.  The fungus continues growing inside the insect eventually killing it.  Although research has show that this fungus can kill the emerald ash borer, more research is need to see if it is effective form a biological control out in the field.

Phenology
Two adult emerald ash borers emerging from an ash tree. One one is have way out and the other's head is just visble as in the D-shaped hole it has created.
Two emerging adult emerald ash borers

Many things in nature are governed by the weather, such as the hatching of bagworm eggs and in this case the emergence of emerald ash borer adults.  You can track this year’s emergence using the “Emerald Ash Borer Forecast“.  This forecast is updated daily and available six days in the future.  Emerald ash borer adults are rarely seen.  Once they emerge, they fly up into the canopy to feed on the leaves.  But if you know when they are emerging you can be on the look out and might be lucky enough to find one.

The Oleaceae Family
Olive tree branch with two clusters of olives
Olive tree

The ash tree is a member of the Oleacae Family and researchers have found that the emerald ash borer can also complete its life cycle in another well-known member of the Oleacae family, the olive tree (Olea europaea).  Although this has only been shown in a laboratory project, there is a possibility that the emerald ash borer could become a problem for olive growers.

Another member of the Oleacae family, the white fringetree (Chionanthus virginicus) is also used as a host for the emerald ash borer.  Although when infested some of these trees don’t survive, a recent study found that white fringetrees are likely to withstand attacks by the emerald ash borer.

Resources

Ash Tree Identification – Michigan State University Extension

Distinguishing Ash from other Common Trees – Michigan State University Extension

Emerald Ash Borer Information Network

Emerald Ash Borer Forecast – National Phenology Network

Insecticide Options for Protecting Ash Trees from Emerald Ash Borer

Signs and Symptoms of the Emerald Ash Borer – Michigan State University Extension

April is Citizen Science Month!

What is citizen science? 

Scientists are limited in the amount of data they can collect by both time and money.  With help from members of the general public, known as citizen scientists, researchers are able to crowd source data collection collecting more data from more places helping them find answers to real-world questions.

So if you want to do something fun and educational that contributes to the advancement of scientific knowledge, consider becoming a citizen scientist.

Citizen Science Projects


Monarch Butterfly (Orang and Black) - Jouney NorthThe Journey North

This project focuses on migration and seasonal changes.   People all over the United States, Canada, and Mexico, report sightings of birds, monarchs, frogs, and other organism.   Watch as reported sightings are mapped in real-time as waves of migrations that move across the continent.


inaturalist logoi-Naturalist

iNaturalist lets you photograph, identify, and document what’s around you.  Every observation can contribute to biodiversity science, from the rarest butterfly to the most common backyard weed.  By sharing your observations with scientists, you will help build our understanding of the natural world.

Never Home Alone

In studying life, scientists have overlooked many regions. Some regions have not been studied because they are so remote. Others because they are so diverse that it is hard to know where to even begin. Then there is the great indoors, which we believe has been understudied in part because it is so immediate. This project aims to document the species that live indoors with humans.


The Cornell Lab of Ornithology - Logo with Bird in MiddleThe Cornell Lab of Ornithology

Hundreds of thousands of people around the world contribute bird observations to the Cornell Lab of Ornithology each year, gathering data on a scale once unimaginable. Scientists use these data to reveal how birds are affected by habitat loss, pollution, disease, climate, and other environmental changes. Your participation will help trace bird migration, nesting success, and changes in bird numbers through time.

Celebrate Urban Birds

Celebrate Urban Birds is a citizen science project focused on better understanding the value of green spaces for birds. This project connects people of all ages and backgrounds to birds and the natural world through the arts and fun neighborhood activities.

e-bird

The goal of this project is to gather this information on bird sightings, archive it, and freely share it to power new data-driven approaches to science, conservation and education.  e-Bird also develops tools that make birding more rewarding.  It provides the most current and useful information to the birding community from photos and audio recordings, to seeing real-time maps of species distribution and alerts that let you know when species have been seen.

NestWatch

NestWatch is a nationwide monitoring program designed to track status and trends in the reproductive biology of birds, including when nesting occurs, number of eggs laid, how many eggs hatch, and how many hatchlings survive.  Their database is intended to be used to study the current condition of breeding bird populations and how they may be changing over time as a result of climate change, habitat degradation and loss, expansion of urban areas, and the introduction of non-native plants and animals.


Logo - The Tick App - Bulls Eye with a the outline of a tick in the miidle suurounded by the words The Tick AppThe Tick App

The Tick App allows people living in high-risk areas for Lyme disease, like Orange County New York, to participate in a tick behavioral study.   Participants complete daily logs and report ticks.  The app provides information on how to remove ticks, prevent tick bites, and general information about ticks.   When enough people are involved, it can also provides information about blacklegged and deer tick activity in our area.


Monarch Caterpilar (Yellow, white, black stripped) on a green leaf - Monarch Larva Monitoring ProjectMonarch Larva Monitoring Program

This citizen science project’s mission is to better understand the distribution and abundance of breeding monarchs and to use that knowledge to inform and inspire monarch conservation.  People from across the United States and Canada participate in this monarch research.  Their observations aid in conserving monarchs and their threatened migratory phenomenon, and advance the understanding of butterfly ecology in general.


Logo - Monarch Watch.org Education, Conservation, ResearchMonarch Watch

Monarch Watch strives to provide the public with information about the biology of monarch butterflies, their spectacular migration, and how to use monarchs to further science education in primary and secondary schools. They engage in research on monarch migration biology and monarch population dynamics to better understand how to conserve the monarch migration.

Monarch Calendar Project

In the spring and fall volunteers collect observations of adult monarchs.  This information is used to  assemble quantitative data on monarch numbers at critical times during the breeding season.

Tagging Monarchs

Each fall Monarch Watch distributes more than a quarter of a million tags to thousands of volunteers across North America who tag monarchs as they migrate through their area. These citizen scientists capture monarchs throughout the migration season, record the tag code, tag date, gender of the butterfly, and geographic location then tag and release them. At the end of the tagging season, these data are submitted to Monarch Watch and added to their database to be used in research.


Logo - The Lost Ladybug ProjectThe Lost Ladybug Project

In the past twenty years, native ladybugs that were once very common have become extremely rare.  During this same time, ladybugs from other parts of the world have greatly increased in both numbers and range. This is happening very quickly and no one knows how, why, or what impact it will have on ladybug diversity.  Citizen scientists involved in this project help scientists answer these questions by photographing ladybugs and submitting the photos along with information about when and where the ladybugs were found.


Logo - Vegetable Varieties for GardenersVegetable Varieties for Gardeners

A project of Cornell University’s Garden Based Learning, this web forum provides an avenue for gardeners to share knowledge.  Gardeners report what vegetable varieties perform well – and not so well – in their gardens.  Other gardeners can view ratings and read the reviews to decide which might work well for them.  Researchers  use the information gain new insight into the performance of vegetable varieties under a wide range of conditions and practices. The information gathered is also used to make a  Selected List of Vegetable Varieties for Gardeners in New York State.


Logo - The outline of New York State under a picture of a moth, a beetle, a moth and a fly with the words Empire State Native Pollinator SurveyEmpire State Native Pollinator Survey

Native pollinators play an essential role in the pollination of flowering plants, including native plants and wildflowers, garden plants, as well as cultivated crops. Some native pollinator species have suffered population declines over the last few decades.   Participants  in this study submit photographs and/or specimens to help  determine the conservation status of a wide array of native insect pollinators in non-agricultural habitats.


iMapInvasivesiMapInvasives

iMapInvasives is an on-line, GIS-based data management system used to assist citizen scientists and natural resource professionals working to protect our natural resources from the threat of invasive species.  Citizen scientists are provided with resources to help them identify invasive species. Their invasive species findings are aggregated with data from a wide variety of sources contributing to early detection of invasive species as well as analysis of management strategies.


A curated beetle collection with pinned specimens above tagsNotes from Nature

Natural history museums across the world share a common goal – to conserve and make available knowledge about natural and cultural heritage. The Notes from Nature project gives you the opportunity to make a scientifically important contribution towards that goal by transcribing museum records. Every transcription that is completed brings us closer to filling gaps in our knowledge of global biodiversity and natural heritage.


Logo - citizenscience.orgCitizen Science Database

This is an official government website designed to accelerate the use of crowdsourcing and citizen science across the U.S. government.  It includes a searchable database of  a government-wide listing of citizen science and crowdsourcing projects designed to improve cross-agency collaboration, reveal opportunities for new high-impact projects, and make it easier for volunteers to find out about projects they can join.


Become a Citizen Scientist today!

Citizen-Science Training

Stop the Spread: Scout for New Forest Pests

Adult Spotted LanternFLy measuring 1 inch in length
Spotted lanternfly adult

Help survey the Hudson Valley Region for potential new forest pests. Reports of invasive pests newly detected in New York are causing great concern. These include spotted lanternfly (Lycorma delicatula), Asian longhorned tick (Haemaphysalis longicornis) and jumping worms (Amynthas sp.). Reporting their presence and stopping their spread are urgent needs. You can help.

Spotted lanternfly (SLF) is an invasive planthopper that can feed on a wide variety of plants including grapevines, hops, maples and fruit trees. It is established in neighboring states and may be moving into our region.

This workshop will prepare interested individuals such as gardeners, hikers, landscapers and forest managers to scout for and identify SLF. Trainees will be asked to be “boots on the ground” to assist in the detection of the pest, to report it to NYS DEC and to help prevent its spread in our area. The biology, identification, potential damage, methods of spread, monitoring and management of SLF will be described. The Blockbuster Surveyor protocol and iMapInvasives app will be reviewed to track the current distribution and abundance (or absence) of SLF.

Identification information will also be provided for Tree of Heaven, Ailanthus altissima, the SLF’s favorite host; an emerging pest, Asian Longhorned Tick, Haemaphysalis longicornis; and Jumping Worms, Amynthas sp., which are in our region but under-reported.

CCE offices in the region will host the trainings in May. Register with the links below:

Questions can be addressed to Joyce Tomaselli, CCEDC, jdt225@cornell.edu, 845-677-8223 ext. 134

Lower HUdson PRISM LogoThis program is part of the Lower Hudson Partnership for Regional Invasive Species Management’s efforts to stop the spread of invasive species in the Lower Hudson Valley. Visit www.lhprism.org for more information on how the LHPRISM strives to address invasive species issues through its partnerships. Click on “Upcoming Events” or “Get Involved” to learn more.

Pest Watch: Spotted Lanternfly

Spotted Lanternfly: a new, unwelcome invader!

by Jen Lerner – Senior Resource Educator, Cornell Cooperative Extension of Putnam County

Adult Spotted Lanternfly with spread wings measuring 1 inch in length
Spotter lanternfly adult with spread wings

Here in the Hudson Valley, we have weathered waves of invasion . . .  Insect invasion that is. Think of the multicolored Asian lady beetle buzzing around your house, soon replaced by the brown marmorated stinkbug dive-bombing your reading light at night. The emerald ash borer followed, and we see our native ash trees, their bark chipped away by woodpeckers foraging for larvae, standing as reminders that our actions have far-reaching impacts. Enter the newest invader. . .

Spotter lanternfly adult on a tree trunk
Spotted lanternfly adult

The spotted lanternfly (Lycorma delicatula) is a colorful insect in the planthopper family that congregates in large numbers to feed on the sap of trees. As it feeds, it excretes “honeydew” a nice name for what is essentially a sticky excrement. That honeydew sometimes alerts people to the presence of the pest.

While the honeydew is a nuisance, the strain placed on the trees’ resources by the insects feeding often kills the tree. The spotted lanternfly’s preferred host, the Tree-of-Heaven (Ailanthus altissima), is also an unwanted invader despite its heavenly moniker. Great, you say? Maybe the lanternfly will polish off the Tree of Heaven? Well these gregarious insects have a few more tricks up their spotted sleeves.

Why are we worried?

Thousands of Spotted Lanternfly adults clustered togeth on the base of a tree
Spotted lanternfly adults are know to aggregate on host trees

Like the brown marmorated stinkbug, spotted lanternflies are a pest of some important agricultural crops. They feed on and harm many fruit producing plants, including apples, peaches, plums, blueberries and grapes, as well as approximately 70 other plants. Besides the far-reaching economic impacts, there are ecological considerations too. Many of these trees and shrubs have relatives in our native ecosystem. For example, our native Shadblow or Serviceberry (Amelanchier sp.) is a close relative of the apple. It provides important forage for migratory birds who return to their nesting sites expecting to find its nutritious early fruits. Imagine the hole their loss would make in our ecosystem. We simply do not know yet how many host plants this insect can survive on or how wide their impact will be.

How can You Help?

Spotted Lanternfly life cycle - Eggs (October - June), Hatch and 1st Instar - black with white spots (May-June), 2nd instar - black with white spots (June-July), 3rd instar - black with white spots (June-July), 4th instar - red with white and spots (July-September), Adult (July to December), Egg Laying (September-Decemeber)Keep on the lookout and report your observations. Learn to recognize the insects themselves as well as  the signs of the spotted lanternfly. While the insect may be easy to spot because of its bright spots, the egg clusters are harder to spy. They are tan to light grey, laid in row and sometimes covered with a mud-like protective layer. If you see the insects or spot the egg clusters, please report the sighting to the NYS DEC at spottedlanternfly@agriculture.ny.gov  or by filling out this online reporting form. Digital photos or dead insects are helpful too. While sticky honeydew is another signs of these sap-feeding insects, many other insects also excrete honeydew in quantities sufficient to make cars, fences and deck surfaces feel tacky.

Don’t help them spread!

Though spotted lanternflies may hitch a ride on a boat, trailer, or vehicle, their egg clusters pose the most insidious risk because the female will lay them on just about anything!

Hitchhiking egg masses can be found on pallets of stone, firewood shipments, Christmas trees, and outdoor furniture. Remember . . . never take firewood from your home to a favorite campground or weekend retreat. Similarly don’t pick up wood from far away and bring it home: you may be bringing a hidden invader with you. Observe the “Don’t Move Firewood” rule.  Inspect boats and trailers for hitchhiking egg masses.  If purchasing used outdoor furniture, or items frequently stored outside like garden tools and wheelbarrows, check all surfaces for egg masses. Yes, the adult insects can fly, but they spread much more quickly when humans help them along.

How did they get here? And how far have they spread?

Spotted lanternfly is native to China, India, and Vietnam. This insect was introduced into South Korea and spread throughout the country (approximately the size of Pennsylvania) in 3 years. On this side of the world, an initial infestation was found in Berks County, Pennsylvania, in 2014. This first infestation is thought to have arrived on a shipment of stone in 2012. Currently the insect is found in 13 counties in South Eastern Pennsylvania and these and many other PA and NJ locations are under NYS quarantine. Historically we know from Korea’s experience that this insect spreads fast. In 2017, one dead was insect found in Delaware County, NY. In New York, 2018 saw spotted lanternfly adults or egg masses in Albany, Chemung, Monroe, Suffolk and Yates Counties, as well as Brooklyn and Manhattan– all thought to be hitchhikers.  So far, there are no known New York infestations. Let’s work hard to keep it that way!Spotted lanternfly distribution in the US showing quarentine areas in PA, NJ, WV, MD, DE, VA

Sources:

NYS DEC: https://www.dec.ny.gov/animals/113303.html

NYS IPM: https://nysipm.cornell.edu/environment/invasive-species-exotic-pests/spotted-lanternfly/

Spotted Lanternfly Look-Alikes

You can find photos of adults, nymphs and eggs here: https://www.aphis.usda.gov/aphis/resources/pests-diseases/hungry-pests/the-threat/spotted-lanternfly/spotted-lanternfly

Join the Battle Beat the Bug slogan witha picture of an adult spotted lanternfly