Tag Archives: education

Vegetable Gardening Resources

Although it seems like no one really knows what is going on right now or how long this situation is going to last, one thing that I am sure of is that there is no time like the present to start your own vegetable garden!

Whether you’ve been growing vegetables for 30+ years or this will be you first year, here is a list of resources that should help you along the way.


Vegetable Gardening Resources – Getting Started!

  • A cucurbit seedling showing the two cotelydons and the first true leaf just starting to unfold.Beginning a Vegetable Garden This resource takes you through choosing a location for you garden to dealing garden pests.
  • Vegetable Growing Guides From artichoke to zucchini, find information about site characteristics and plant traits as well as growing information and special considerations.
  • Vegetable Planting Guide This resource includes a chart that shows when you should seed things inside, when you should seed things outside and when it is time to transplant. (Note: Although written for Rockland County, it works Orange County as well.)
  • Average Last Frost Date Although the last frost date is important, keep in mind that even after the last frost, cool temperatures will stress warm season crops like peppers and tomatoes.  These crops like nighttime temperatures consistently above 45°F and soil temperatures at about 70°F.
  • Soil Amendments and Fertilizers This guide includes fertilizer guidelines by plant group as well as information about pH adjusters, growth stimulants and potting mixes

Soil Samples

A trowel stuck in a raised garden bedBefore starting a garden, it is always a good idea to get a soil test.  As our office is closed, we are no longer accepting soil samples at this time.  Fortunately, if you need your soil tested, you can mail it directly to the soil testing lab, Dairy One.

Once you have your results, we would be more than happy to answer any questions you may have.

Vegetable Garden Problems

  • Vegetable Pests Colorado potato beetle on a potato stemFrom cucumber beetles and aphids to spider mites and slugs, this guide will help you identify your pest and give you tips on how to manage it.
  • Vegetable Diseases Choose your vegetable and then look through Fact Sheets and Information Bulletins to help identify the disease and learn the best way to manage it. 
  • Vegetable Cultural and Environmental Problems Sometimes you might think your plant has a disease when in fact the problem is not caused by a pathogen but environmental conditions or a cultural practice.  This resource will help you diagnose your problem and teach you what you can do about it.

Garden Helpline!

Garden Helpline Card (Information in text below image.)If you need help identifying the cause of a problem or figuring out a management strategy give us a call.  Our Garden Helpline phones are staffed April – November, Monday, Wednesday, and Friday, from 9:30 am – 12:30 pm.  But you can always leave us a message or send us an e-mail.

Call (845) 343-0664 or e-mail your questions to mghelpline@cornell.edu.

Online Classes

If you still want to learn more, take advantage of these online classes!

Wicker basket full of lettuce, tomatoes, peppers, beets, turnips,onions and a sprig of mintVegetable Gardening 101: Virtual Class (via Zoom)

Cornell Cooperative Extension of Tompkins County

Date and Time: Saturday, March 28, 2020, 10:00 am – 12:00 pm

Cost: $10-$30 / person self-determined sliding scale, pay what you can afford

This class will help the beginning vegetable gardener learn how to choose a site for their vegetable garden, prepare the soil, start and transplant seeds, how to choose and use compost and mulch, how to care for your plants throughout the season, and when to harvest. Get the basics so you can have a great garden no matter how much experience you have.

Tray of cabbage seedlings in Starting Seeds 101: Virtual Class (via Zoom)

Cornell Cooperative Extension of Tompkins County

Date and Time: Wednesday, April 1, 2020, 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm

Cost: $10-$30 / person self-determined sliding scale, pay what you can afford

Grow everything from artichokes to zucchini from seed at home. Save money and enjoy the miraculous process of seed germination and plant growth in your home to get you through these last weeks of winter and get your garden started early. We’ll cover techniques such as cold stratification and scarification as well as simple recipes for making your own potting and fertilizer mixes to save even more money. We’ll talk about tools such as grow lights and heat mats and soil blocks.


So in the time of uncertainty, I encourage you to grow some food.

Stay home!  Stay safe!  Be well!  Happy Gardening!

 

The Great Backyard Bird Count has begun!

A bright red male cardinal perched a twig as snow falls The Great Backyard Bird count has begun! Starting today, February 14th until Monday, February 17th you are invited to join this citizen science project in which people all over the world spend at least 15 minutes simply counting the numbers and kinds of birds that they see.

This project began in 1998 by the Cornell Lab of Ornithology and the National Audubon Society.  Just last year over 200,000 people in 100 countries participated and counting over 6,800 species of birds.

The data collected from the Great Backyard Bird Count helps scientist learn more about bird populations including population fluctuation, migration timing, effects of climate change, etc. This is extremely important as birds are great indicator species and in North America we have seen significant decline in bird population in the past 50 years!A black crow standing on the snowy ground

So please take 15 minutes of you time today, tomorrow, Sunday and/or Monday and participate in this amazing opportunity to contribute to scientific research!

Click here to learn how to join the Great Backyard Bird Count!

Related link:

Birds as Indicator Species – Ornithology: The Science of Birds

North America has lost more than 1 in 4 birds in the last 50 years, new study says – National Audubon Society

 

4-H Fair and Family Festival

4-H Fair & Family Festival, July 26, 27, & 28, Presented by: Cornell Cooperative Extension Orange County, More information at cceorangecounty.org

Friday, July 26, 2019, 3:00 PM – 10:00 PM

Saturday, July 27, 2019, 9:00 AM – 10:00 PM

Sunday, July 28, 2019, 9:00 AM – 3:00 PM

Join us for three days of fun and festivities for the whole family!

Sign: Cow Pie Bingo, Horse Show, Duck Derby, Movie in the Park, Food and Smooties, Petting Zoo, Arts and Crafts, Fun!For more information, click here!

Master Gardener Volunteers will be there all weekend answering all of your gardening questions, selling succulents and a facilitating a new activity for kids of all ages called “Bugs in Goo!”  Come on by our tables and check it out!

Location:

4H Park and Education Center
300 Finchville Turnpike
Otisville, NY 10963

 

Citizen-Science Training

Stop the Spread: Scout for New Forest Pests

Adult Spotted LanternFLy measuring 1 inch in length
Spotted lanternfly adult

Help survey the Hudson Valley Region for potential new forest pests. Reports of invasive pests newly detected in New York are causing great concern. These include spotted lanternfly (Lycorma delicatula), Asian longhorned tick (Haemaphysalis longicornis) and jumping worms (Amynthas sp.). Reporting their presence and stopping their spread are urgent needs. You can help.

Spotted lanternfly (SLF) is an invasive planthopper that can feed on a wide variety of plants including grapevines, hops, maples and fruit trees. It is established in neighboring states and may be moving into our region.

This workshop will prepare interested individuals such as gardeners, hikers, landscapers and forest managers to scout for and identify SLF. Trainees will be asked to be “boots on the ground” to assist in the detection of the pest, to report it to NYS DEC and to help prevent its spread in our area. The biology, identification, potential damage, methods of spread, monitoring and management of SLF will be described. The Blockbuster Surveyor protocol and iMapInvasives app will be reviewed to track the current distribution and abundance (or absence) of SLF.

Identification information will also be provided for Tree of Heaven, Ailanthus altissima, the SLF’s favorite host; an emerging pest, Asian Longhorned Tick, Haemaphysalis longicornis; and Jumping Worms, Amynthas sp., which are in our region but under-reported.

CCE offices in the region will host the trainings in May. Register with the links below:

Questions can be addressed to Joyce Tomaselli, CCEDC, jdt225@cornell.edu, 845-677-8223 ext. 134

Lower HUdson PRISM LogoThis program is part of the Lower Hudson Partnership for Regional Invasive Species Management’s efforts to stop the spread of invasive species in the Lower Hudson Valley. Visit www.lhprism.org for more information on how the LHPRISM strives to address invasive species issues through its partnerships. Click on “Upcoming Events” or “Get Involved” to learn more.