Clarification Regarding Electives

Below, is a previously posted list of electives that are available this semester (S18).

To clarify, these courses may or may not count toward specific requirements.
For example, MAE 5920 could be used as a technical elective or possibly an advisor approved elective (contingent on advisor approval), but cannot be used as a major approved elective (it is not on the list of major approved electives).

Please be sure to familiarize yourself with the requirements for each type of elective when planning your course schedule. Detailed information on electives can be found here (scroll down to notes): http://www.mae.cornell.edu/mae/academics/undergrad/memajor/index.cfm

The list of accepted major approved electives can be found here: http://www.mae.cornell.edu/mae/academics/undergrad/memajor/electives.cfm

If you are in doubt regarding whether a course will count toward a specific elective, please don’t hesitate to contact me (eft24@cornell.edu).

Course Number Title Instructor
ENGRG 1112 Practical Computing for Engineers A. Ruina
MAE 1510 Modeling and Simulation of Real-World Scientific Problems P. Pepiot, P. Clancy
MAE 3130 Atomic and Molecular Structure of Matter R. Robinson
MAE 4150 & 5150 GPS: Theory and Design D. Hysell
MAE 4160, 4161, & 5160 Spacecraft Technology and Systems Architecture D. Selva
MAE 4230, 4231, & 5230 Intermediate Fluid Dynamics J. Wang
MAE 4510 & 5510 Aerospace Propulsion E. Fisher
MAE 4530 Computer-Aided Engineering: Applications to Biological Processes A. Datta
MAE 4560 & 5560 Bioastronautics and Human Performance A. Diaz
MAE 4590 Introduction to Controlled Fusion: Principles and Technology D. Hammer
MAE 4610 Entrepreneurship for Engineers J. Callister
MAE 4640, 4641, & 5640 Orthopaedic Tissue Mechanics C. Hernandez
MAE 4710 & 5710 Applied Dynamics: Robotics, Vehicles, Machines, and Biomechanics A. Ruina
MAE 4860, 4861, and 5860 Automotive Engineering J. Callister
MAE 5010 Future Energy Systems K. Zhang
MAE 5200 & 5210 (7 wks) Dimensional Tolerancing in Mechanical Design H. Voelcker
MAE 5430 Combustion Processes M. Louge
MAE 5469 Energy Seminar II D. Hammer, J. Tester
MAE 5790 Nonlinear Dynamics and Chaos S. Strogatz
MAE 5920 Systems Analysis Behavior and Optimization D. Goldberg
MAE 5949 Enterprise Engineering Colloquium J. Callister
There are multiple graduate level offerings as well. Check with the instructor before enrolling.

CEAA Student Group Leadership Award

The Cornell Engineering Alumni Association and the College of Engineering sponsor a Student Group Leadership Award each year.  This annual award recognizes one or more of the student organizations that have worked diligently and creatively to improve their activities.  CEAA provides a modest monetary award to winning organizations to provide seed money for future events.  The number and amount of awards may vary, but the total allocation is $1,000.  Generally speaking, a group will not win an award two years in a row.  

The Leadership Award is designed to foster the following goals:  

  • To secure an increase in the quality and the frequency of an organization’s events and activities.
  • To secure an increase in membership relative to the appropriate student population.
  • To stimulate the active involvement of a larger fraction of the organization’s members in sponsored activities.
  • To enhance the quality of life for engineering students and hence make outstanding contributions to the College of Engineering.
  • To promote the active involvement of undergraduates in the Cornell Society of Engineers, the alumni organization of the College.
  • To participate fully in student group activities, including planning and implementation of joint events. 

The application process for the award is very simple. 

  1. Submit a brief description of your organization’s goals and accomplishments for this present academic year, Fall 2017-Spring 2018.
          –     Give explicit discussion related to the items listed below in “Discussion Questions.”
          –     Submit additional information you feel would be helpful to the selection committee.
          –     Limit your presentation to two typed pages and a one-page calendar of events for this year.
          –     Do not submit large annual reports. 
  1. Advisor statement: Each organization should also include a brief statement from its faculty advisor assessing the progress your organization has made in meeting the goals listed above.

Discussion questions:

  1. List (on an attached calendar) your organization’s events this year and estimate the number of students who actively helped with the organization and coordination of the events (include tabulations for both officers and non-officers). Also, estimate the number of students who attended the functions.  
  1. Indicate the number of active members for the 2016-2017 and 2017-2018 years. Also, indicate the total number of students in the College who are eligible to join your organization.  
  1. Describe the ways in which your group has tried to promote membership and how you have tried to attract new members. Also, describe the involvement your group has had with the Cornell Society of Engineers, if any.  
  1. Describe the events that represent new activities undertaken by your group this year. For example, is this event unique among other student organizations in the College?  In what way?  
  1. Two representatives from each winning organization will be invited to attend the CEAA awards banquet in April. Please include the names and phone numbers (or email addresses) for your designated representatives.  (Typically, these are the incoming and outgoing presidents.) 

Complete applications, including advisor endorsement, should be turned in to the Undergraduate Programs Office in 167 Olin Hall or emailed to crp5@cornell.edu by Tuesday, March 6, 2018.  Applications received after this time will not be eligible for consideration by the selection committee. 

Career Fair: Employers List and Preparation Opportunity

The Engineering and Entrepreneurial Career Fair is approaching quickly; on Wednesday, February 7 from 9:00AM- 2:00 PM.

Below is a list of employers that are attending the Career Fair that will be of interest to MAE majors specifically.

Datto Inc.
Orbital ATK
Arconic
Teach for America
Schlumberger
Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
The MITRE Corporation
Infinera
IXL Learning
Lutron Electronics Company, Inc.
Raytheon Company
Stantec
Momentive Performance Materials
ASML
General Dynamics, Electric Boat
BorgWarner
Uncommon Schools
Dennis Group
Sensata Technologies
Formlabs
CognitiveTPG
CONMED
Air Liquide
Oliver Wyman
Mott MacDonald
Infineum USA L.P.
United States Navy
Intel Corporation
Build-It-Yourself
Gomez and Sullivan Engineers, DPC
The Raymond Corporation
Schluter Systems L.P.
Brown and Caldwell
Cognex Corporation
Pitney Bowes
Applied Materials
Moog
Grapeshot
Cornell University, Systems Engineering Program
Jerome Glass
United Technologies Climate, Controls & Securities
AVANGRID (RG&E/NYSEG/CMP/UIL/CNG/SCG/BGC)
ThinkB1G
NYS OGS – New York State Office of General Services
Honeybee Robotics
Ursa Space Systems Inc.
SRC, Inc
Delta Engineers, Architects, and Land Surveyors, DPC
Exelon Corporation
Procter & Gamble  (P&G)
Doron Precision Systems, Inc.
Cerebras Systems
Merck & Co., Inc.
Green Mountain Energy

Consider researching these employers on Handshake and attending the Career Fair to speak with them in person.

Career Fair Preparation:
Master Your Future: How to Successfully Navigate a Career Fair is hosted by Regeneron and will be held on Thursday, February 1st from 4:45-5:45 PM. Learn optimal strategies for making the most of a career fair and other employer events. You will leave with an understanding of what employers seek in candidates and how to best present yourself.

BEE 5330 Engineering Professionalism, 1 credit FE Review

BEE 5330 Engineering Professionalism, 1 credit FE Review

Where and When:
Wednesday Lectures: Room 255 Olin Hall (weeks 2-7, 12); 7:30 to 8:45 pm
Monday Help Sessions: 7:30-9:00 (Hollister Room 368); starts Monday Feb 6 (for Math HMWK #1) 

The FE review course will meet Wednesday nights 7:30 -8:45 pm in a lecture session format (Olin Hall Room 255). You must attend 5 of the 7 lectures to obtain full credit (3% for each attendance). Each week, we will provide an optional “help session” on Monday evenings (Hollister Room 368). Some weeks there will be no Wednesday lectures (weeks 8, 9, &10); our last lecture is Wednesday April 12 Week 12. The Monday evening help sessions will be used as a work group session where the subject matter professor identified on the syllabus and/or along with student TA’s will be present to answer questions and provide help with that week’s homework. Group interaction is encouraged. The weekly homeworks are due Tuesdays (11:59 pm) the day after the Monday help session and are submitted only through Blackboard.

Prerequisites

  • Senior or graduate student standing
  • Students are strongly encouraged sign up to take the NY Fundamental of Engineering (FE) exam held throughout the year in consecutive months starting January & February with one month between the next pair of active months, i.e., no exams given in March, but April & May, not June, etc. Students are to sign up directly with the NCEES site (see ncees.org). Each state has Pearson testing centers (similar to GRE exam or SAT’s); in NY, the closest are: 421-423 E. Main Street, Endicott, NY, and 6700 Kirkville Rd, E. Syracuse, NY. These exams are 5 hrs + 20 minutes total, with a break in middle. You no longer have to complete Form 1 and Form 20; you do file a Form 2 with your Department towards end of the semester & we turn them in as a block to the Engineering Registrar (ER) to certify that you have graduated (post tense) and then the ER sends the forms to NY State for record filing.

Instructors                  M.B. Timmons, (BEE) and J.R. Stedinger (CEE)
FE Topic Leaders         R. Rand (T&AM),  J.D. Albertson (CEE), Matthew Reid and Damian Helbling (CEE), Elizabeth Fisher (MAE), and K. Gebremedhin (BEE)

Final exam      Take-home FE exam (posted already on blackboard)

Grading             Letter grade or S/U (to count as 1-credit engineering science elective, student must select letter grade).

Attendance (3% per week for required five lecture sessions)                                           15%

Weekly Homework assignment (10 assignments, 8 required at 8% each)                         64%

Final Exam (taking the posted FE exam)                                                                          21%

Total                                                                                                                               100%

A ≥ 90%; B≥80%; C≥70%; D≥60%.

Homework Format[1]

All homework is done and submitted on Blackboard. You are encouraged to work in groups, but each person must submit homework individually. Be careful NOT to miss the deadlines (Tuesday evenings 11:59 pm) as Bb will not allow you to post your HW after the deadline.

 Texts

  • Lindeburg, M.R., 2011. FE Review Manual, 3rd Ed. Professional Publications, Inc. Belmont, CA. Text available from Amazon:
    • Looks like the ‘best’ deal this year is to buy from Amazon ($21.48 rent to $65 purchase):
    • Be careful NOT to buy a 2nd edition version, since the book changed substantially in the 3rdYou can also purchase discipline specific review manuals from either Amazon of PPI (ppi2pass.com):
    • Fundamentals of Engineering Supplied-Reference Handbook, 9.4 edition. Available on-line for free from the NCEES; http://ncees.org/exams/study-materials/download-fe-supplied-reference-handbook/. This text is your CRITICAL tool to pass the FE exam.
  • Tetteh, M.O. and M.B. Timmons, 2003. The Engineering Code of Ethics and Its Application (130 pages).  Cayuga Aqua Ventures, Ithaca, NY. Available on Blackboard. 

COURSE DESCRIPTION: The 1-credit FE review course will be dedicated to review materials associated with the NY Fundamentals of Engineering exam. A few hours of out-of-class time will be required each week to complete practice FE exam questions. Your primary help will come from the instructor for the particular week of the semester (subject matter area specific). The course final exam is a practice FE exam and this exam will require 8 or more hours to complete. We have had a 99% passing rate for the FE exam for all our students over the last 8 years, and 7 out of 8 years had a perfect passing record.

Note, that when submitting your homework via Blackboard, you are allowed unlimited attempts, but your score for that homework will be the score of your final attempt. For the Final Exam, you are only allowed one attempt to submit as a final score; you can have the system ‘save’ your work so you do not have to complete at one sitting. Once you are satisfied with all your answers, then you submit at which point your work is electronically scored and recorded. Be careful.

Example: Content of FE Exam for Other Disciplines (see NCEES.org for content of Specific Discipline Exams)

  1. Mathematics and Advanced Engineering Mathematics 12–18
  2. Probability and Statistics 6–9
  3. Chemistry 7–11
  4. Instrumentation and Data Acquisition 4–6
  5. Ethics and Professional Practice 3–5
  6. Safety, Health, and Environment 4–6
  7. Engineering Economics 7–11
  8. Statics 8–12
  9. Dynamics 7–11
  10. Strength of Materials 8–12
  11. Materials Science 6–9
  12. Fluid Mechanics and Dynamics of Liquids 8–12
  13. Fluid Mechanics and Dynamics of Gases 4–6
  14. Electricity, Power, and Magnetism 7–11
  15. Heat, Mass, and Energy Transfer 9–14

Total problems  110

Where Can I Find More Information?

  • NCEES (National Council of Examiners for Engineering and Surveying), ncees.org
  • NYS Professional Engineering – Licensing requirements

http://www.op.nysed.gov/prof/pels/

Jane W. Blair, PE, Executive Secretary

NY State Boards for Engineering and Land Surveying, & Interior  Design

Office of the Professions – New York State Education Department

89 Washington Ave., Albany, NY 12234; 518-474-3817 ext. 140    518-473-6282 – fax

  • NYS Professional Engineering – Application forms   www.op.nysed.gov/prof/pels/peforms.htm (<– copy and paste into your browser)
  • Nadine Porter and Jery Stedinger: Administrative Assistant and Professor, Civil & Environmental Engineering; Cornell University, 221 Hollister Hall;  ndp5@cornell.edu    607-255-3412
  • Michael Timmons: Professor, Biological and Environmental Engineering

Cornell University, 302 Riley-Robb Hall; mbt3@cornell.edu   607-255-1630; cell 607.227.5638

 

Manufacturing Courses Available Spring 2018; One New

MAE 1130 – Introduction to Computer-Aided Manufacture

Lecture Dates: 1/29, 2/5, 2/12, 2/26, 3/5, 3/12, 3/19
Times:  (Mondays) 6:30pm – 8:30pm
CAM & Machine Labs:   Thursdays 6:30pm – 8:30pm; Saturdays 8am – 10am or 10am – 12pm
Tuesdays after 3/19 lecture through end of semester:  6:30pm – 8:30pm
Lecture Location: TBA
Computer Lab:  CAD/CAM Lab: B38 Upson Hall,
Machine Lab:  Emerson Manufacturing Teaching lab B40 Upson Hall
Course enrollment limit:  Lecture/CAM Lab – 36; Machine Lab – 22
Instructor:  Ron Mielbrecht
Credits:  1 -Sat/Unsat

Description:

Introduction to the fundamentals of computer-aided manufacture (CAM) and computer numerical control (CNC) programming. The course is a series on CAM and provides practical applications of the use of G-code and solid modeling software, CNC mill and/or lathe setup and tool selection. The course includes CAM lab sections and students will program the Initials and C-Block projects but will not machine them.  The course is required for any student wishing to take lab component for training to use the CNC machines in the Emerson machine shop.

Non-credit lab section for Emerson lab:

The machine lab portion is reserved for students who need to use the CNC machines for academics and coursework.  You must enroll in the CAM course (MAE 1130) and sign up for the non-credit, concurrent lab to take the certification test for use of the Haas CNC machines in the Emerson Lab.   Selection for lab slots are done on a sign up basis and approval by the instructors.  You must be registered for the lecture component and a green apron user to be considered for the lab component.  The slots are distributed based on the balance of project team users, researchers and others.  A list of approved project team users will be sent to the Student Project Team Director for final approval.

The signup sheet will be posted on the door to the Emerson Lab no later than January 19th and will be removed at 9AM on February 2.  Students selected for the lab component will be notified early the following week.

About Ron Mielbrecht:   Ron is currently an Applications Engineer with BorgWarner Morse Systems. A graduate of Stevens Institute of Technology with a BEME he has focused on the automotive business for his career as President of M2 Race Systems, a supplier of Cylinder Heads to the racing industry and Manager of Prototypes and Product Development at Jesel Valvetrain Innovation, a Valvetrain supplier to the racing industry and now at Borg Warner.

MAE 6910, Sec. 602: Courses Section: Design Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (DFMEA)

Dates: 1/29, 2/5, 2/12, 2/19, 2/26
Times: Mondays 7 to 9 PM
Location: TBA
Course enrollment limit – 24
Credits:  1– Graded
Instructor: Fenton O’Shea

Description

In industry, engineers are often tasked with the mitigation of technical and functional risks associated with the development and launch of new products.  A Design Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (DFMEA) is a controlled  process by which a product concept, a customer specification, and other system functional requirements are transformed into a fully validated (robust) product design whose product risks can be recorded, minimized, and communicated to the greater organization prior to product launch.  This course will explore the realization of validated designs thorough the utilization of the DFMEA process.

About Fenton O’Shea:  Fenton O’Shea’s engineering and management-focused career has included challenging and rewarding roles in the machine tool, synchrotron, aerospace, contract packaging, and automotive industries. In addition to having taught engineering courses at Cornell University for over a decade, Fenton is currently employed as an Engineering Manager at BorgWarner Automotive in Ithaca, New York. Fenton has a bachelor’s degree in Mechanical Engineering from GMI Engineering and Management Institute and a Master of Engineering degree from Cornell University.

Lab Swap Procedure for MAE 2030, 2250, 3260, and 3280

Lab Swap Procedure for MAE 2030, 2250, 3260, and 3280

Need to change your lab but the lab you want is full?

1. Go to 125 Upson Hall and look on the round table, for the appropriate swap sheet for your course.

2. Note your name, e-mail, current lab and the lab you want.

3. Check back frequently to see if there is anyone with whom you can trade labs.

4. Contact the person with whom you’d like to trade labs and arrange to arrive, at the same time, to 125 Upson Hall to each complete an add/drop form.

5. Submit the add/drop form to 158 Olin Hall

List of Electives Available in Spring 2018

Good Afternoon,

Considering the many course changes that have taken place in preparation for Spring 2018, here is a list of electives currently available for the coming semester (no further changes are expected):

Course Number Title Instructor
ENGRG 1112 Practical Computing for Engineers A. Ruina
MAE 1510 Modeling and Simulation of Real-World Scientific Problems P. Pepiot, P. Clancy
MAE 3130 Atomic and Molecular Structure of Matter R. Robinson
MAE 4150 & 5150 GPS: Theory and Design D. Hysell
MAE 4160, 4161, & 5160 Spacecraft Technology and Systems Architecture D. Selva
MAE 4230, 4231, & 5230 Intermediate Fluid Dynamics J. Wang
MAE 4510 & 5510 Aerospace Propulsion E. Fisher
MAE 4530 Computer-Aided Engineering: Applications to Biological Processes A. Datta
MAE 4560 & 5560 Bioastronautics and Human Performance A. Diaz
MAE 4590 Introduction to Controlled Fusion: Principles and Technology D. Hammer
MAE 4610 Entrepreneurship for Engineers J. Callister
MAE 4640, 4641, & 5640 Orthopaedic Tissue Mechanics C. Hernandez
MAE 4710 & 5710 Applied Dynamics: Robotics, Vehicles, Machines, and Biomechanics A. Ruina
MAE 4860, 4861, and 5860 Automotive Engineering J. Callister
MAE 5010 Future Energy Systems K. Zhang
MAE 5200 & 5210 (7 wks) Dimensional Tolerancing in Mechanical Design H. Voelcker
MAE 5430 Combustion Processes M. Louge
MAE 5469 Energy Seminar II D. Hammer, J. Tester
MAE 5790 Nonlinear Dynamics and Chaos S. Strogatz
MAE 5920 Systems Analysis Behavior and Optimization D. Goldberg
MAE 5949 Enterprise Engineering Colloquium J. Callister
There are multiple graduate level offerings as well. Check with the instructor before enrolling.

MAE 4490 No Longer Offered

Dear Students,

I am sorry to inform you that, due to unforeseen circumstances, MAE 4490 must be cancelled for the coming semester. Please be advised that if you pre-enrolled for the course, it will no longer appear on your schedule in Student Center.

Since MAE 4490 will not be taught this Spring, MAE 5430 will be replacing its meeting time and room. MAE 5430 will now meet on MWF 12:20PM – 1:10PM in Hollister 362.

Thank you for your understanding as we make final preparations for the Spring semester.

Best,
Emily

Upson Space Updates

Updates regarding space availability and configuration in Upson Hall:

  • Classrooms 102, 202, 206, and 222 will be bookable by student groups, starting in Spring 2018, for times when classes or class-related activities are not being held.
  • Classrooms 102, 202, 206, and 222 will remain unlocked until 9 pm on weekdays, instead of locking at 4:30 pm.
  • For the second floor bump-out area (facing the quad), more standard-height tables have been ordered to replace the very low coffee-table style tables. We are hopeful that these tables will arrive early in the Spring 2018 semester.

I will continue to send updates as adjustments are made.