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  Cornell University

MAE Publications and Papers

Sibley School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

New article: Modeling Multi-scale Aerosol Dynamics and Micro-environmental Air Quality Near a Large Highway Intersection using the CTAG Model

Article: Wang YJ, Nguyen MT, Steffens JT, Tong ZM, Wang YG, Hopke PK, and Zhang KM, (2013) Modeling Multi-scale Aerosol Dynamics and Micro-environmental Air Quality Near a Large Highway Intersection using the CTAG Model. Science of the Total Environment, 443; 375-386.

DOI

Abstract:¬† A new methodology, referred to as the multi-scale structure, integrates “tailpipe-to-road” (i.e., on-road domain) and “road-to-ambient” (i.e., near-road domain) simulations to elucidate the environmental impacts of particulate emissions from traffic sources. The multi-scale structure is implemented in the CTAG model to 1) generate process-based on-road emission rates of ultrafine particles (UFPs) by explicitly simulating the effects of exhaust properties, traffic conditions, and meteorological conditions and 2) to characterize the impacts of traffic-related emissions on micro-environmental air quality near a highway intersection in Rochester, NY. The performance of CTAG, evaluated against with the field measurements, shows adequate agreement in capturing the dispersion of carbon monoxide (CO) and the number concentrations of UFPs in the near road micro-environment. As a proof-of-concept case study, we also apply (TAG to separate the relative impacts of the shutdown of a large coal-fired power plant (CFPP) and the adoption of the ultra-low-sulfur diesel (ULSD) on UFP concentrations in the intersection micro-environment. Although (TAG is still computationally expensive compared to the widely-used parameterized dispersion models, it has the potential to advance our capability to predict the impacts of UFP emissions and spatial/temporal variations of air pollutants in complex environments. Furthermore, for the on-road simulations, CTAG can serve as a process-based emission model; combining the on-road and near-road simulations, CTAG becomes a “plume-in-grid” model for mobile emissions. The processed emission profiles can potentially improve regional air quality and climate predictions accordingly.

(C) 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

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