More than 130 faculty, academics, staff, grad students and others attended the first School of Integrative Plant Science (SIPS) Retreat in Kennedy Hall Tuesday.

That morning, after a welcome from SIPS director Alan Collmer, speakers from each section gave short presentations on their work:

  • Michael Scanlon (Plant Biology), Ontogeny of the grass ligule: how to draw a line on a leaf. (View video.)
  • Courtney Weber (Horticulture), The art and science of berry breeding. (View video.)
  • Michael Gore (Plant Breeding & Genetics), Progress towards building a genetic foundation for biofortification of maize.
  • Harold van Es (Crop and Soil Science), Adapt-N: cloud computing technology to achieve agronomic and environmental objectives. (View video.)
  • Fabio Rinaldi (Plant Pathology & Plant-Microbe Biology), Hitting the Sweet Spot: TAL effectors as tools for targeted gene activation in plants.
Speakers Scanlon, Weber, Gore, van Es and Rinaldi.

Speakers Scanlon, Weber, Gore, van Es and Rinaldi.

Following lunch, a poster session fueled discussion and sharing.

Following lunch, a poster session fueled discussion and sharing.

 

Speaker Weber brought raspberries from his variety trials for sampling at lunch.

Speaker Weber brought raspberries and blackberries from his variety trials for sampling at lunch. (Carol Grove photo.)

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From Justine Vandenheuvel, associate professor, Horticulture Section:

The HORT 2205 (Grapes to Wines lab class) went to Long Island the weekend of October 4-5 to learn about the growing grape and wine industry there. We visited with Alice Wise, viticulturist with Cornell Cooperative Extension of Suffolk County at the Long Island Horticultural Research & Extension Center, Riverhead, N.Y., to learn about her research and extension program. We also had stops at the Shinn Estate Vineyards, and Channing Daughters Winery (co-owned and managed by Cornell alum Larry Perrine).

Larry Perrine guides student Anne Repka in the art and science of a "punch-down" on Lemberger.

Larry Perrine guides student Anne Repka in the art and science of a “punch-down” on Lemberger.

 

Barbara Shinn and David Paige (right) talk with students at a Shinn Estate Vineyards.

Barbara Shinn and David Paige (right) talk with students at Shinn Estate Vineyards.

 

Alice Wise (second from left) takes the class on a tour of her viticulture research at the Long Island Horticultural Research & Extension Center. (Camila Tahim photo.)

Alice Wise (second from left) takes the class on a tour of her viticulture research at the Long Island Horticultural Research & Extension Center. (Camila Tahim photo.)

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Marvin with berry-themed cakeFaculty, friends, family, staff, students and others gathered Friday to help Horticulture Section chair Marvin Pritts celebrate his 30 years at Cornell.

Congratulations Marvin!

celebrating 30 years of Marvin

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Stop-Hunger-NowCALS and Cornell Dining are partnering with Stop Hunger Now on Thursday, October 16 from 2-5 p.m. in the Trillium Dining Hall to package 30,000 meals for crisis relief and school feeding programs.

Sign up now at: http://events.stophungernow.org/cornell

And please share this with friends, clubs and organizations!

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If you missed yesterday’s horticulture seminar Targeting vegetable crop improvement in East Africa with Phillip Griffiths, it’s available online.

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Nearly 50 growers, educators and others attended the Berry Open House hosted at Cornell Orchards and the East Ithaca Research Facility last Friday. Topics covered by faculty and graduate students from several departments,  NYSIPM Program and Cornell Cooperative Extension educators included day-neutral low tunnel strawberry systems, cranberries, bird deterrents, spotted-wing drosophila management, biopesticides, soil health, trellising systems, berry varieties, pollinators and more.

Attendees view day-neutral low tunnel production system research.

Attendees view day-neutral low tunnel production system research.

Click on thumbnails for larger view.

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Each fall, associate professor Frank Rossi introduces students to plants grown for food, beverages, fiber, aesthetics and recreation in HORT 1101 (Horticultural Science and Systems). With the help of associate professor and viticulture specialist Justine Vanden Heuvel, those students got hands-on experience harvesting Concord grapes, measuring their sugar levels and turning them into grape juice on a sunny afternoon last Friday at Cornell Orchards.

View more HORT 1101 posts.

HORT 1101 students with grape harvest

HORT 1101 students with grape harvest


Click thumbnails for larger view.

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N.Y. Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, left, samples an NY1 apple alongside its breeder, Susan Brown, associate director of the New York State Agricultural Experiment Station, at the 2010 New York Farm Days event in Washington, D.C.

From October 3, 2014 news release from Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand’s office:

Today, U.S. Senators Charles E. Schumer and Kirsten Gillibrand announced $5,647,879.46 in federal funding to support New York State’s specialty crop producers and specialty crop research initiatives. These funds were allocated through the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Agricultural Marketing Service (AMS) as well as its National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) program and were authorized through the 2014 Farm Bill. Specifically, AMS will be administering the Specialty Crop Block Grant Program (SCBGP) funding, which will provide the New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets with $1,417,712.46 in funds to help support specialty crop growers, including locally grown fruits and vegetables, through research and programs to increase demand. In addition, NIFA will be administering the Specialty Crop Research Initiative (SCRI) funding, which will provide Cornell University $4,230,167 in funds aimed at supporting the specialty crop sector by developing and disseminating science-based tools to address the needs of specific crops.

“The success of New York State’s agricultural industries relies on our ability to robustly grow and market safe, nutritious and wholesome specialty crops,” said Kathryn J. Boor, the Ronald P. Lynch Dean of Cornell University’s College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. “These resources for specialty crops research will allow our scientists and our partners in the NYS Department of Agriculture to delight consumers while further enhancing economic returns for our producers across a range of products including onions, apples, wine grapes, potatoes, tomatoes and more.”

The New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets will utilize its $1,417,712.46 in SCBGP funds to support 15 specialty crop programs from around the state. New York State will be partnering with Cornell University, Cornell University’s NYS Agriculture Experiment Station, the New York State Apple Association, Rensselaer County, the Cornell Cooperative Extension of Broome County and the New York State Pest Management Program to make all of these work on projects surrounding food safety, marketing and promotion, and research and grower education.

Cornell University, specifically, will utilize $2,627,860 separate SCRI funds to optimize viticulture practices, genomic characterization, cultivar evaluation, enological characterization, wine production, marketing strategies, agri-tourism, product familiarity and preference. Ultimately, this research seeks to eliminate the production and marketing constraints that currently hinder the profitability and sustainability of emerging cold climate grape and wine industries in the Upper Midwest and Northeast. Cornell will also be using $1,602,307 of its SCRI funds to research ways to reduce the impact of tuber necrotic viruses in potatoes by working with all sectors of the potato industry to develop and implement new practices leading to a healthier potato crop and higher farm income.

View list of projects and more information at Kirsten Gillibrand’s website.

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Making cider at Cornell Orchards

Making cider at Cornell Orchards. Click image to view video.

From Kristina Engel-Ross, Cornell Orchards Sales Manager ke95@cornell.edu:

We will have cider starting October 3! And we will have Cornell ice cream!

Apple varieties available now:

  • Sansa
  • MacIntosh
  • Cortland
  • Macoun
  • Gala
  • Shizuka
  • Certified-Organic Liberty

And from the Thompson Vegetable Research Farm in Freeville:

  • Acorn squash
  • Sunshine squash (Kabocha winter squash)
  • Pie/cooking pumpkins
  • Carving pumpkins
  • Baby pumpkins
  • Keuka Gold and Chieftain potatoes

And more. Visit our website for details.

 

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dilmun hill steering committee flyer

From Katharine Constas, Dilmun Hill steering committee member kmc379@cornell.edu:

Dilmun Hill is Cornell’s student-run farm that has been practicing sustainable agriculture on Cornell University’s campus for more than a decade. The farm is both a site for vegetable production and a center for learning and field research, providing students, faculty, staff and community with opportunities for experiential learning, group collaboration and research.

The Steering Committee maintains the farm during the academic year, ensures continuity between years, and coordinates outreach events and funding. There is room for creativity in the members’ roles on the committee, so please apply if you are interested in any of the following and more!

Please contact me if you have any questions: kmc379@cornell.edu

 

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