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Botanical Illustration Intensive exhibition

Tuesday, students in Intensive Study in Botanical Illustration (PLHRT 3250) exhibited their portfolios in an informal mini-art show in Plant Science 141. The course, taught by Marcia Eames-Sheavly using the Moodle-based distance-learning modules she created  is one of the requirements for the Minor in Horticulture with a Focus in the Botanical Arts.

art show

The artists included:

Anthony Teng

Anthony Teng

Patty Chan

Patty Chan

 

Shujie Li

Shujie Li

Tommi Schieder

Tommi Schieder

Yuxi Xiao had to take an exam and missed the fun.

Yuxi Xiao had to take an exam and missed the fun.

Senior honors Nobel laureate McClintock with library display

Juliet Jacobson ’16 stands in front of the exhibit she designed for Nobel laureate Barbara McClintock in Mann Library. (Photo: Matt Hayes)

Juliet Jacobson ’16 stands in front of the exhibit she designed for Nobel laureate Barbara McClintock in Mann Library. (Photo: Matt Hayes)

Cornell Chronicle [2016-05-10]

It took nearly 40 years for Barbara McClintock ’23, M.A. ’25, Ph.D. ’27, to be recognized for her groundbreaking research, winning the 1983 Nobel Prize for work she completed in the 1940s.

Now after another 30 years, Cornell has a prominent display marking the achievements of a scientist who discovered one of the most fundamental aspects of genetics.

And it’s all thanks to the persistence of Juliet Jacobson ’16.

Jacobson, a senior studying biological sciences in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, first learned of McClintock’s achievements while in high school. When she arrived at Cornell she expected to find a statue or other prominent marker commemorating a titan of science who earned three degrees at the university and later returned to teach. What she found instead was a plaque near the small space where McClintock conducted her research, far from popular spots on campus where wandering students might learn of her life and legacy.

Read the whole article.

Relationships drive Cornell Vegetable Program’s reach

Hoover speaks with Cornell Vegetable Program specialist Judson Reid '94 in a climate-controlled high tunnel. (Photo: R.J. Anderson/Cornell Cooperative Extension)

Hoover speaks with Cornell Vegetable Program specialist Judson Reid ’94 in a climate-controlled high tunnel. (Photo: R.J. Anderson/Cornell Cooperative Extension)

Cornell Chronicle [2016-05-09]:

Commercial vegetable grower Nelson Hoover does not own a car, a computer or a degree. In fact, the 28-year-old never attended high school. But for over a decade, Hoover, a member of the Groffdale Mennonite Conference in Penn Yan, New York, has been one of the Cornell Vegetable Program’s (CVP) most trusted research partners.

A Cornell Cooperative Extension (CCE) regional agriculture team, CVP assists farmers in 12 western New York counties – the largest vegetable-producing region in the state – by helping them apply Cornell research and expertise to their local growing operations.

Two of those counties, Yates and Seneca, are home to the highest concentration of Old Order communities in the state. As their populations grows, the Amish and Mennonite influence on the area’s agriculture markets has followed suit. They now operate 99 percent of dairy farms in the area and own of one of the region’s largest produce auctions, which has grown by $185,000 annually over the last 12 years.

Working to maximize vegetable quality and output in Yates and Seneca counties is Cornell-trained horticulturist and CVP extension vegetable specialist Judson Reid ’94. Specializing in small-farm operations and high tunnel growing, Reid has become a trusted agricultural voice – even within those sects not typically receptive to outside influence.

Read the whole article.

In the news

From Picture Cornell May 4:

Students peruse the colorful offerings by Hortus Forum during an Earth Day display, April 20. (Photo: Jason Koski/University Photography)

Students peruse the colorful offerings by Hortus Forum during an Earth Day display, April 20. (Photo: Jason Koski/University Photography)

Boots on the farm: Helping military vets enter agriculture [CALS Notes 2016-03-03] –  Cornell Cooperative Extension (CCE) and the Cornell Small Farms Program (CFSP) are helping military veterans find new career opportunities in agriculture.

New toolkit clarifies agricultural economic assessment [Cornell Chronicle 2016-03-03] –  A Cornell University economist has teamed up with the Agricultural Marketing Service of the U.S. Department of Agriculture and other researchers to provide a standardized toolkit to evaluate the economic benefits of investing in local and regional food systems.

Jim Giovannoni elected to the National Academy of Sciences [Discovery that Connects (SIPS blog) 2016-03-03] – Jim Giovannoni (SIPS Section of Plant Biology Adjunct Faculty) was among 84 new members elected to the National Academy of Sciences on May 3. Giovannoni, BTI staff member and plant molecular biologist with ARS, researches the genetics and regulation of fruit ripening, with particular focus on tomato.

 

Solar farm opens in Geneva

The completed Sutton Road Solar Farm became operational April 13. (Photo: Rob Way/NYSAES)

The completed Sutton Road Solar Farm became operational April 13. (Photo: Rob Way/NYSAES)

Cornell Chronicle [2013-05-03]

Bring on the sunshine: Cornell University’s new Sutton Road Solar Farm, a 2-megawatt energy facility that will offset nearly 40 percent of the annual electricity demand at the New York State Agricultural Experiment Station (NYSAES) in Geneva, New York, became fully operational April 13.

“Our researchers are conducting basic and applied research to improve crops and make them more resilient to disease, drought and the worst effects of an uncertain climate as we chart a more sustainable agricultural future,” said Susan Brown, the Goichman Family Director of NYSAES. “Within our fruit and vegetable programs we’re studying the best way to harvest the sun, so it is only fitting that the energy powering our labs and greenhouses will do the same.”

Construction of the solar farm, a 17-acre facility featuring 9,120 photovoltaic panels located off Sutton Road in Seneca, New York, started last spring and is Cornell’s second megawatt-scale solar project. In September 2014, the university opened the Cornell Snyder Road Solar Farm with 6,778 photovoltaic panels on an 11-acre plot that adjoins the Tompkins County Regional Airport in Lansing, New York. Adding the new Geneva array to the Lansing facility’s output, the university will produce about 5,700 megawatt-hours of electricity annually.

Read the whole article.

Kenong Xu goes to Washington

Kenong Xu (second row from the top, second from right) with other recipients of the prestigious Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers. Click image for larger view.

Kenong Xu (second row from the top, second from right) with other recipients of the prestigious Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers. Click image for larger view.

Yesterday, President Obama welcomed more than 100 leading scientists and engineers from across the country (and around the world!) to thank them for their work on some of the most challenging and complex issues in science and technology. These individuals, including Assistant Professor in the Horticulture Section Kenong Xu, are the latest recipients of the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE). They spent two days in Washington, D.C., meeting with Administration leaders and sharing the insights of their work.

During his visit with these awardees, President Obama congratulated them on their achievements and urged them to continue to lead the way in driving discovery and innovation. He also noted that the recipients, all of whom are either employed or funded by the Federal government, underscored the importance of our Nation’s investments in research and development.

Congratulations Kenong!

Read the whole article at whitehouse.gov.

Video: Conservatory ribbon-cutting

If you missed yesterday’s remarks and ribbon-cutting at the Student Open House at the Liberty Hyde Bailey Conservatory, it’s available online.

Kevin Nixon, Glenn Evans, Alan Collmer and Ed Cobb cut the ribbon.

Kevin Nixon, Glenn Evans, Alan Collmer and Ed Cobb cut the ribbon.

Bonus video: The Liberty Hyde Bailey Conservatory – History, features, plants.

More information: Visit the Conservatory website.

Botanical illustration exhibition May 10

botanical illustrationFrom Marcia Eames-Sheavly:

Please mark your calendars for May 10, from 12:30 – 1:00, Rm. 141 Plant Science, for an informal exhibit of student work in PLHRT 3250: Botanical Illustration Intensive.

This small but mighty group of 5 students has produced some very fine pieces!

Come peruse their work and celebrate their hours and hours of hunching over drawing tables these past months.

 

 

 

NYFVI awards grants worth $1.6 million

nyfvi logoThe New York Farm Viability Institute announced the award of $1.6 million in funding for 20 projects that aim to help farmers across the state improve improve yields, lower input costs, reach new markets and develop new opportunities.

Some projects of horticultural interest include:

  • Optimizing use of native persistent nematodes for biological control of Plum Curculio in organic and conventional apple production (Arthur Agnello, Entomology)
  • Developing a mechanical method to seed undervine cover crops in NY winegrape vineyards (Hans Walter-Peterson, Finger Lakes Grape Program)
  • Use of under vine fescues in Long Island vinifera vineyards to reduce production costs and environmental impact (Alice Wise, CCE Suffolk County)
  • Insects On-Line: Forecasting insect management for nursery and Christmas tree growers (Elizabeth Lamb, NYS Integrated Pest Management Program)
  • Insect-killing nematodes for biocontrol of greenhouse thrips and fungus gnats (John Sanderson, Entomology)
  • Developing a sustainable hops IPM program from greenhouse to harvest  (Tim Weigle, NYS Integrated Pest Management Program)
  • Minimizing wildlife impacts on yield and food safety risk in vegetables by utilizing repellency tactics (Darcy Telenko, Cornell Vegetable Program)
  • Adoption of controlled release nitrogen fertilizer in potato production (Rebecca Wiseman, CCE Suffolk County)
  • Onion growers can reduce rot! (Steven Beer, Plant Pathology & Plant-Microbe Biology)

More information:

Seminar video: Untermyer Gardens: Restoring Eden in Yonkers, NY

If you missed Monday’s Horticulture Section seminar, Untermyer Gardens: Restoring Eden in Yonkers, NY with Stephen Byrns,  Chairman, Untermyer Gardens Conservancy, it  is available online.

More seminar videos: Horticulture | School of Integrative Plant Science

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