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Seminar video: Plant Exploration in a Changing World

If you missed Monday’s Horticulture Section seminar Plant Exploration in a Changing World – Collecting in the 21st Century with Anthony Aiello, Director of Horticulture and Curator, Morris Arboretum, it is available online.

More seminar videos: Horticulture | School of Integrative Plant Science

Online courses for new and experienced farmers

The Cornell Small Farms Program announces open registration for its 2017-2018 season of Small Farm Online Courses building the technical and business skills of farmers. Expert farmers and extension educators guide students through the latest research-based information to help improve efficiency and increase profit on small farms.

Students connect with other farmers, work on farm plans, and gain practical tips without leaving their home. Course content can be accessed anywhere with a high-speed internet connection.

Most courses are six weeks long. Each week features an evening webinar and follow-up readings, videos, and activities. Students and their instructors connect through online forums and live chat. If you aren’t able to attend the webinars in real-time, they are always recorded for later viewing.

From aspiring to experienced farmers, there is a course for nearly everyone. There’s a handy chart on our course homepage to direct you to the right courses for your experience level.

Course costs range from $150 – $250, which entitles two people from a farm to attend. Discounts for early sign up and multiple course sign ups are available, as well as a special discount for veterans.

Qualify for a 0% interest loan! Participants who complete all requirements of one or more online courses are eligible to be endorsed for a 0% interest loan of up to $10,000 through Kiva Zip

Check out the course listings for more information on a particular course and the instructors. Visit our Frequently Asked Questions page to learn more about registration, payment, and computer requirements.

Video: 2017 Liberty Hyde Bailey Lecture

If you missed last Friday’s Liberty Hyde Bailey Lecture, From Farm to Fork: How CALS Is Leading the Food Revolution, it’s available online.

This year’s line-up included:

  • Kathryn J. Boor, Ronald P. Lynch Dean of the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Cornell University
  • Christine Smart, Professor, Plant Pathology and Plant-Microbe Biology and Interim Director, School of Integrative Plant Science
  • Michael Mazourek, Assistant Professor, Plant Breeding and Genetics and Horticulture Sections, School of Integrative Plant Science
  • Thomas Björkman, Associate Professor, Horticulture Section, School of Integrative Plant Science
  • Courtney Weber, Associate Professor, Horticulture Section, School of Integrative Plant Science
  • Carmen Moraru, Associate Professor, Food Science

Plant Phenotyping Technologies mini-symposium videos

If you missed the May 16 mini-symposium Next Generation Plant Phenotyping Technologies, the talks are available online.

Speakers included:

  • Todd M. DeZwaan (LemnaTec Corporation): Phenotyping solutions for basic and applied research in plant biology and agriculture
  • Argelia Lorence (Department of Chemistry and Physics, Arkansas State University): Novel phenomic approaches for model and crop plants
  • Michael Gore (Plant Breeding and Genetics Section, SIPS, Cornell University): The great outdoors: the application of field-based phenotyping to improve crop resiliency
  • Chris Topp (Donald Danforth Plant Science Center): What’s going on in there: imaging technologies to understand the hidden parts of plants
  • Olena Vatamaniuk (Soil and Crop Sciences and Plant Biology Sections, SIPS, Cornell University): X-ray fluorescent microscopy imaging for studies of mineral nutrient homeostasis

Seminar video: Light Matters – Sensing and Signaling in Plants

If you missed Monday’s Horticulture Section seminar Light Matters – Sensing and Signaling in Plants   with Tessa Pocock, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, it is available online.

 

More seminar videos: Horticulture | School of Integrative Plant Science

Seminar video: ‘Seed to Supper’ program: Reaching underserved audiences through garden education

If you missed Monday’s Horticulture Section seminar ‘Seed to Supper’ program: Reaching underserved audiences through garden education  with Christine Hadekel,  Oregon Food Bank, it is available online.

 

More seminar videos: Horticulture | School of Integrative Plant Science

Seminar video: Finding Anna: The archival treasure hunt into the life of Anna Botsford Comstock

If you missed Monday’s Horticulture Section seminar Finding Anna: The archival treasure hunt into the life of Anna Botsford Comstock  with Karen Penders St. Clair, Graduate Field of Horticulture, it is available online.

 

More seminar videos: Horticulture | School of Integrative Plant Science

Seminar video: Climate change mitigation on the farm: soil carbon counts the most

If you missed Monday’s Horticulture Section seminar Climate change mitigation on the farm: soil carbon counts the most with Jeffrey Beem-Miller, Graduate Field of Horticulture, it is available online.

 

More seminar videos: Horticulture | School of Integrative Plant Science

Researchers Look for Genetic Clues to Help Grapes Survive Cold

CALS News [2017-03-29]

Al Kovaleski, a doctoral student in the field of horticulture, visits the Anthony Road Winery in Penn Yan, New York. Photo by Chris Kitchen / University Photography

Al Kovaleski, a doctoral student in the field of horticulture, visits the Anthony Road Winery in Penn Yan, New York. (Photo:  Chris Kitchen /University Photography)

Months before northern vineyards burst into their lush summer peak, the delicate grape buds holding the nascent fruit in its tiny core must first withstand the freezing onslaught of winter.

Understanding how grape buds respond to subzero temperatures is of paramount concern to vineyard managers in New York and other northerly grape-producing states. Some of the more popular varieties used in the wine and juice industries can survive temperatures far below the freezing point of water. By a process known as supercooling, cellular mechanisms within the bud maintain water in liquid state down to around minus 4 to minus 30 degrees Fahrenheit, depending on the species. Beyond a certain low-temperature threshold, ice forms inside the cells, cellular functions cease and the bud dies.

Horticulturists have long relied on traditional methods to study freezing in plants. Now a researcher in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences is using powerful technologies on campus to explore in new ways the cellular mechanics that allow grape buds to survive brutal cold. The research has implications for vineyard economics, especially as climate change opens more northerly land for cultivation and current growing regions experience more extreme weather.

Al Kovaleski, a doctoral student in the field of horticulture, is using the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS) to create 3-D images of grape buds. The images produced at CHESS are providing a unique perspective as Kovaleski unravels the genetic underpinnings of supercooling in grape buds.

Read the whole article.

 

This article originally appeared in the Cornell Chronicle.

Seminar video: Hard cider research at Washington State University

If you missed Monday’s Horticulture Section seminar Hard cider research at Washington State University with Carol Ann Miles, Washington State University, it is available online.

 

More seminar videos: Horticulture | School of Integrative Plant Science

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