Archive for the “Video” Category

Associate professor Ken Mudge, program aid Steve Gabriel and research support specialist Jonathan Comstock appear in a new movie, The Resilient Ones: A Generation Takes On Climate Change from Bright Blue EcoMedia. The feature-length documentary explores how communities are adapting to climate change in the Adirondack Mountains as seen through the eyes of high school students.

In the film, Comstock discusses the effects of climate change on farming. Mudge and Gabriel talk about the promise of forest farming (excerpt below).

The Resilient Ones had its broadcast premiere on Mountain Lake PBS May 15. Producer Vic Guadagno is encouraging other PBS stations in New York to air the film, and hopes to arrange a screening in Ithaca. It’s not yet available online, but DVDs are available for purchase through PBS.

The film website also features climate change lesson plans, video excerpts and trailers.

Comments No Comments »

If you missed two recent Department of Horticulture seminars by PhD candidates in the Graduate Field of Horticulture, they are available online:

Gonzalo Villarino: High throughput RNA sequencing elucidates novel responses of Petunia hybrida to salt stress

 

Alex Paya: Does neighbor identity affect the belowground growth and physiology of trees?

 

The Department of Horticulture seminar series is on hiatus until fall. But you can view previous seminars on the Cornell Horticulture YouTube channel’s Seminar playlist.

Comments No Comments »

When Justin Kondrat ’14 transferred to Cornell from SUNY Morrisville, it didn’t take long for him to feel rooted. Among the ivy, he found fertile ground to thrive and grow, through an anchoring network of teachers, mentors and friends who cultivated his creativity and passion for plants.

The brainchild of Justin Kondrat ’14, the independent project conveys that Cornell "you can really be inclusive and come together as a community" at Cornell. (Jason Koski/University Photography)

The brainchild of Justin Kondrat ’14, the independent project conveys that Cornell “you can really be inclusive and come together as a community” at Cornell. (Jason Koski/University Photography)

That passion has been transformed into a living tribute to the power of nature to foster well-being and captivate a community: a display of more than 50,000 golden daffodils, white narcissus and purple hyacinth flowers spelling out the word “rooted” in 10-foot letters along the steep side of Libe Slope below the bell tower.

The installation glows red and white at night, thanks to solar-powered lights that have been woven between the flowers.

Although it started as Kondrat’s independent project under the guidance of senior lecturer of horticulture Marcia Eames-Sheavly, more than 100 people ended up taking part, from planting 13,000 bulbs to transporting, arranging and staking 350 pots.

Read the whole article and view more photos. [Cornell Chronicle 2014-04-24]

See also:

Aerial view

Aerial view.

Special thanks to Chris Kitchen Photography and Design and East Hill Flying Club.

Comments No Comments »

From Lori Brewer, Senior Extension Associate, Department of Horticulture:

If you missed the Spring 2014 Sustainable Landscapes webinars, they are available online:

You can find other, past webinars and recordings as well at:  https://vimeo.com/gbl/videos

Woody Shrubs for Stormwater Retention Practices from CCE Horticulture on Vimeo.

Comments No Comments »

Via CornellCast: Video of the ‘Rooted’ art installation on Libe Slope.

ROOTED is a living community art installation that celebrates the diversity of ways people on campus stay rooted in their lives and in the community. Student and faculty volunteers planted 13,000 flower bulbs in 350 pots and moved them to Libe Slope below McGraw clock tower to spell the word, “ROOTED,” in 10-foot-tall letters.

The project was spearheaded by student artist Justin Kondrat and faculty advisor Marcia Eames-Sheavly.

See also: Time-lapse and ribbon-cutting video.

Comments No Comments »

If you missed Monday’s seminar, Soils in the Urban Environment: A Long Term Evaluation of the Scoop & Dump Remediation Strategy with Miles Sax, MPS/PGL Program Graduate Field of Horticulture, it’s available online.

Comments No Comments »

Student artist Justin Kondrat and faculty advisor Marcia Eames-Sheavly.

Student artist Justin Kondrat and faculty advisor Marcia Eames-Sheavly.

ROOTED is a living community art installation coming mid-April 2014. (The installation is tentatively scheduled for April 14 with ribbon-cutting on April 16.)

Preparations began in December when volunteers planted 13,000 flower bulbs in 350 pots and moved them into a cooler to simulate winter chilling.

On March 25, student artist Justin Kondrat and faculty advisor Marcia Eames-Sheavly moved the pots to the greenhouse to speed up growth.

When the bulbs are in full bloom in mid-April, volunteers will move the pots to Libe Slope below McGraw clock tower and spell out ROOTED in 10-foot-tall letters.

ROOTED celebrates the diversity of ways people on campus stay rooted in their lives and in our community.

Get involved. Find more info at facebook.com/RootedatCornell

View the ROOTED preview video.

Comments No Comments »

If you missed Ted DeJong’s seminar on Monday, Peach tree scion vigor is physiologically linked to the xylem anatomy of the rootstock, it’s available online.

Comments No Comments »

If you missed Marcia Eames-Sheavley‘s seminar Creativity in Horticulture Teaching and Extension on Monday, it’s available online. See also our Art of Horticulture YouTube playlist.

Comments No Comments »

If you missed Monday’s seminar with Steve Reiners, 20 years of vegetable research and extension — successes, disappointments and what lies ahead, it’s available online.

)

Comments No Comments »