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Seminars

Seminar video: Push-pull intercropping systems in sub-Saharan Africa

If you missed Monday’s Horticulture Section seminar, Push-pull intercropping systems in sub-Saharan Africa: A prime example of successful ecological intensification  with Laurie Drinkwater, Professor, Horticulture Section, School of Integrative Plant Science, it  is available online.

More seminar videos: Horticulture | School of Integrative Plant Science

Archer, newest Cornell strawberry, hits the sweet spot

Courtney Weber, associate professor in the School of Integrative Plant Science, at the New York State Agricultural Experiment Station (NYSAES) in Geneva, New York. Photo: Rob Way/College of Agriculture and Life Sciences

Courtney Weber, associate professor in the School of Integrative Plant Science, at the New York State Agricultural Experiment Station (NYSAES) in Geneva, New York. Photo: Rob Way/College of Agriculture and Life Sciences

Cornell Chronicle [2016-09-12]:

Strawberry fans, rejoice. The newest Cornell strawberry variety concentrates intense flavor in a berry big enough to fill the palm of your hand.

Topping out at over 50 grams, Archer, the latest creation from Cornell berry breeder Courtney Weber, is comparable in size to a plum or small peach. But this behemoth stands out in ways beyond just its proportions: the flavor and aroma exceed what you’d expect from a strawberry of such unusual size.

“Archer is an extraordinarily high-flavored berry,” said Weber, associate professor in the Horticulture Section of the School of Integrative Plant Science. “It has an intense aroma, so when you bite into it you get a strong strawberry smell, and it’s very sweet, so you get a strong strawberry flavor that really makes an impact.”

Weber says the combination of large fruit and strong flavor hits the sweet spot for local growers who sell in farmers markets, u-pick sites and roadside stands. Archer ripens in June and holds its large size through multiple harvests for two to three weeks.

Read the whole article.

In September 12 Horticulture Section seminar, Weber explains the long road he had to take to bring ‘Archer’ to market:

View full seminar.

Kao-Kniffin kicks of Horticulture seminar series Monday 8/29

Kao-Kniffin

Kao-Kniffin

Jenny Kao-Kniffin, assistant professor in the Horticulture Section, kicks off the Fall 2016 Horticulture Section Seminar Series on Monday, August 29, 2016 at 12:20 p.m. in 404 Plant Science Building.

She will speak on Modifying plant-biotic interactions in rhizospheres for novel weed management approaches.

This and other Horticulture Section seminars are also available via videoconference to A134 Barton in Geneva. View the full fall line-up for the seminar series.

Most seminars are also recorded and available online on the Horticulture Section seminar YouTube playlist.

 

 

Video: Minisymposium tribute to Peter Davies

Peter Davies, now and then. (Photo: Matt Hayes, CALS Communications)

Peter Davies, now and then. (Photo: Matt Hayes, CALS Communications)

If you missed Friday’s minisymposium in honor of Peter Davies’ 46 years of research and teaching in the Plant Sciences at Cornell highlighting the changes that have taken place in plant hormone biology over the last 40 years and how Davies contributed to progress in the field, it’s available online.

The symposium featured three talks:

  • Hormones and Plant Development – Jim Reid, Distinguished Professor, University of Tasmania
  • Global Aspects of Plant Biotechnology – Sarah Evanega, Director, Cornell Alliance for Science
  • Plant Politics – Ron Herring, Professor, Department of Government, Cornell University

Read more about the symposium in CALS Notes.

Liberty Hyde Bailey Lecture video: Genomics and the Future of Agriculture

If you missed Friday’s  Liberty Hyde Bailey Lecture, Genomics and the Future of Agriculture, it’s available online.

The lecture and panel discussion, in honor of professor emeritus Steve Tanksley, winner of the 2016 Japan Prize, featured three former lab members — Greg Martin, Jim Giovannoni, and Susan McCouch — introduced and moderated by Kathryn J. Boor, Ronald P. Lynch Dean of the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. They celebrated Tanksley’s contributions to plant breeding and genetics and the spirit of genomic discovery in the School of Integrative Plant Science with a panel discussion on genomics and the future of agriculture.

Dreer seminar video: Impatiens and Vegetables in Thailand

If you missed Friday’s Dreer Award Seminar video Impatiens and Vegetables in Thailand  featuring James Keach, Ph.D. ’16 (Plant Breeding), it’s available online.

Visit Keach’s Dreer Award blog PhytoRealism detailing his travels.

Administered by the Horticulture Section of the School of Integrative Plant Science, the Frederick Dreer Award provides a wonderful opportunity each year for one or more students to spend 4 months to up to a year abroad to pursue interests related to horticulture. Read more about the Dreer Award.

Dreer Seminar May 20: Impatiens and Vegetables in Thailand

Dreer Award Seminar Impatiens and Vegetables in Thailand
James Keach PhD Graduate, Plant Breeding
Minors: Horticulture & International Agriculture
Friday, May 20 at 12 noon in 404 Plant Science

Keach will share his experiences abroad including stints at the Tropical Vegetable Research Center (a national vegetable germplasm preservation organization), Chia Tai Co. (a Thai-founded vegetable seed company) and in the Department of Pharmacognosy at Prince of Songkla University.

Visit Keach’s Dreer Award blog PhytoRealism detailing his travels.

Administered by the Horticulture Section of the School of Integrative Plant Science, the Frederick Dreer Award provides a wonderful opportunity each year for one or more students to spend 4 months to up to a year abroad to pursue interests related to horticulture. Read more about the Dreer Award.

keach-dreer
View full sized poster.

Seminar video: Untermyer Gardens: Restoring Eden in Yonkers, NY

If you missed Monday’s Horticulture Section seminar, Untermyer Gardens: Restoring Eden in Yonkers, NY with Stephen Byrns,  Chairman, Untermyer Gardens Conservancy, it  is available online.

More seminar videos: Horticulture | School of Integrative Plant Science

Seminar video: Creating a Garden for Climate Change Education

If you missed Monday’s Horticulture Section seminar,  Creating a Garden for Climate Change Education with Sonja Skelly, Director of Education, Cornell Plantations, it’s available online.

More seminar videos: Horticulture | School of Integrative Plant Science

College Farms of America Speaker Series starts March 2

Dilmun-Hill-Speaker-Series-flyerx400From Betsy Leonard, CUAES Organic Coordinator:

College farms are important centers for learning and community on campuses throughout the country. Dilmun Hill Student Farm invites you to learn about and celebrate some of the Nation’s most well-regarded college farms as we invite their members to speak about their innovative and important work, and the benefits to their students and communities that these farms provide.

Speakers:

  • March 2:
    Bob Harned, Berea College Farm Manager
    Berea College, Kentucky
  • April 6:
    Todd McLane, TC3 Farm Director
    Tompkins Cortland Community College, New York
  • May 4:
    Beth Hooker, Ph.D., Sustainability Initiative Director and Nancy Hanson, CSA Program Manager
    Hampshire College, Massachusetts

All three events will be held from 4-5pm, in 102 Mann Library.

Free of charge, and all are welcome!

Supported by: Cornell Dining, the Cornell University Agricultural Experiment Station, and Mann Library.

 

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