Archive for the “Research” Category

Cornell berry breeder Courtney WeberReposted from Station Notes, [2015-03-02]

March 2, Cornell University joined a number of its peers nationwide in announcing the official launch of the National Land-grant Impacts website, a centralized online resource that highlights the teaching, research and extension efforts by Land-grant universities.

The website provides access to university or regional-specific impact stories, which document the research and extension programming planned, performed,and implemented by Cornell and other land-grant universities. The website, as a cooperative effort of these institutions, represents a collective voice for the agricultural experiment station and cooperative extension arms of the land-grant universities.

“The Land-Grant Impacts website is a new tool that will better inform the American people and the international community of the significant agricultural research, education and extension impacts taking place at land grant universities across our nation, which offer practical solutions to today’s critical societal challenges,” said Sonny Ramaswamy, director of the National Institute of Food and Agriculture at the U.S. Department of Agriculture. “This website will help policy makers and the public learn more about this work that is partially supported with NIFA funding.”

Read the whole article.

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dilmun logoDilmun Hill, Cornell’s student-run farm,  is currently looking for students who would like to conduct research at the farm. This is a great opportunity for students interested in agroecology, soil science, horticulture, agronomy or other related fields.

If interested, please fill out the application and submit to Betsy Leonard by Friday, March 13th.

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CALS Communications

Greenhouse ribbon-cutting at the New York Agricultural Experiment Station, Geneva, N.Y., October 2014. Photo: Rob Way, CALS Communications.

Reposted from CALS Notes [2015-02-24]

It was a year of promises and deliveries, of new partnerships and the research and outreach results those relationships fuel. For Cornell’s New York State Agricultural Experiment Station in Geneva, 2014 will be remembered as a very good year.

Here are a few of the highlights:

  • The Northern Grapes Project, led by senior extension associate Tim Martinson, received a $2.6 million USDA grant to continue developing grape growing, wine making and marketing resources for cold climate grape growers.
  • Susan Brown, incoming Station director and faculty in the Horticulture Section, was named a 2014 “Women of Distinction” in a ceremony at the State Capitol.
  • Sarah Pethybridge was hired as an assistant professor in the Plant Pathology and Plant-Microbe Biology Section, Steve Reiners assumed the position of associate chair of the Horticulture Section, Anna Katharine Mansfield was promoted to associate professor in the Department of Food Science, and Jennifer Grant was named director of the New York State Integrated Pest Management Program.
  • The Station completed its 10th year of boosting science literacy through a plant science program for the Geneva City School District’s third and fourth graders.
  • The Summer Research Scholars Program hosted 27 students from top universities around the country for immersion in agricultural research.

And that’s just a start.

Read all the highlights in the Station’s “2014 Year in Review” available online on the NYSAES homepage: nysaes.cals.cornell.edu.

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Saturday morning, graduate students from all five sections helped the School of Integrative Plant Sciences put its best foot forward to prospective graduate students at a poster session in Stocking Commons hosted by SIPS and the Field of Food Science.

The enthusiastic presenters included Michael Schmidt, Soil and Crop Sciences …

Michael Schmidt

… and Maria Gannett, Horticulture.

Maria Gannett

 

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Flower Bulb Research at Kenneth Post Lab Greenhouses.

Flower Bulb Research at KPL

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For more than 15 years, CALS has bolstered its sustainability research with a steady stream of gifts from the Toward Sustainability Foundation (TSF), a Massachusetts-based organization founded by an anonymous, eco-minded Cornell alumna.

Since 1999, TSF provided more than $1.1 million in funding for more than 100 faculty and student projects that examine the technological, social, political, and economic elements of sustainable agriculture.

Projects funded for 2015 include research and outreach topics ranging from soilless media for rooftop farms to growing organic grains for local markets to using vermicompost to grow tomatoes.

View full list of funded projects and contact information for each.

A 2014 TSF grant aided Horticulture graduate student Miles Schwartz-Sax's study on long-term urban soils remediation using organic amendments.

A 2014 TSF grant aided Horticulture graduate student Miles Schwartz-Sax’s study on long-term urban soils remediation using organic amendments.

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Two Cornell projects were recently featured on the Northeast Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education Program‘s Dig Deeper online feature:

Judson Reid

Judson Reid

High tunnels for winter greens – Cornell Vegetable Specialist Judson Reid used a Northeast SARE grant to research and document pest and disease management in high tunnels using biological controls and biorational pesticides on winter crops like spinach, kale, pak-choi, chard, and mustard. Target pests included caterpillars, slugs, aphids, and thrips, and diseases like downy mildew and rot. Reid and his research team also looked at varietal susceptibility to these disease and insect pressures.

Twenty growers agreed to take part in a case-study component designed to build their scouting, pest identification, and cultural control skills through regular contact with the project team; this contact also helped farmers understand action thresholds and how to use cultural control strategies with more precision. This one-to-one interaction had real impact—as one farmer in Allegany County put it, “The regular contact with Cornell Cooperative Extension project personnel gave me access to a great resource—someone who was always willing to discuss all ag-related questions.” Read more.

 

Marvin Pritts

Marvin Pritts

Analyze this: Professional development for berry production – The rising cost of inputs and the environmental impacts of fertilizers provide new impetus for taking a whole-farm approach to berry crop nutrient and soil management. However, agricultural service providers, who are frequently on the front line for advice and assistance with berry crop soil and nutrient problems, often feel ill-equipped to address farmer concerns and promote beneficial practices; no single, comprehensive resource on this topic has been available for either educators or growers.

This two-year project, led by Dr. Marvin Pritts, Cornell University small fruit horticulturalist and berry crop nutrition specialist, aimed to bridge this gap by training a cadre of 50 educators across the Northeast. The performance target was that 15 educators would develop and deliver outreach programs reaching 150 berry growers who manage a total of 750 acres of berry crops, with 50 growers going on to conduct soil, nutrient, and soil health testing; these growers would get one-on-one help interpreting test results, and would implement analysis-based fertilization and soil health management practices on their farms. Read more.

 

 

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Kenong Xu's research will help researches change tree architecture allowing more high-density planting and transforming the layout of orchards. (Robyn Wishna photo.)

Kenong Xu’s work will help researchers change tree architecture, allowing more high-density planting and transforming the layout of orchards. (Robyn Wishna photo.)

Cornell Chronicle [2015-01-12]

A Cornell-U.S. government research team is poised to transform the shape of trees and orchards to come, thanks to a $1.5 million grant from the National Science Foundation Plant Genome Research Program.

The project, “Elucidating the Gene Networks Controlling Branch Angle and the Directional Growth of Lateral Meristems in Trees,” is led by Kenong Xu, assistant professor of horticulture at the New York State Agricultural Experiment Station in Geneva, and plant molecular biologist Chris Dardick and research engineer Amy Tabb from the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Appalachian Fruit Research Laboratory in West Virginia.

The research team is seeking to uncover genes and gene networks that underpin how apical control – the inhibitory effect on a lateral branch’s growth by the shoots above it – influences branch growth in apple and peach trees.

Read the whole article.

 

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Susan Brown

Susan Brown

Message from Susan Brown, the Goichman Family Director of the New York State Agricultural Experiment Station and Herman M. Cohn Professor of Agriculture and Life Sciences:

Research and extension at Cornell’s New York State Agricultural Experiment Station —Cornell’s Geneva campus — is addressing challenges and opportunities in specialty crops. We are an integral part of the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, and our faculty have academic homes in the departments of Entomology and Food Science and in the sections of Plant Pathology and Plant-Microbe Biology (PPPMB) and Horticulture in the School of Integrative Plant Science (SIPS).

Our primary focus on fruits and vegetables is complemented by research and extension on additional key plants, including turfgrass, biofuel willow and hops. From investigating and mitigating new diseases and insects, to developing new varieties, or perfecting a food or beverage formulation, Cornell scientists at Geneva have enthusiasm and passion for projects that benefit growers and consumers alike.

Our goal is to produce better food, from almost every aspect imaginable—new varieties with better nutritional quality, better eating quality and resistance to diseases as well as better products from the raw ingredients.  Our scientists also work to develop growing systems that maximize quality in the field, orchard and vineyard;  sharing these techniques with growers produces a superior product for consumers to enjoy.

Several of our programs work directly with growers and entrepreneurs and to troubleshoot their individual problems. The Food Venture Center helps entrepreneurs develop safe new products, the New York State Wine Analytical Laboratory aids producers in solving problems, and our Good Agricultural Practices Program (GAPS) teaches producers to meet and exceed food safety standards for handling produce.  Growers, producers, entrepreneurs, established businesses and consumers benefit directly from our expertise.

Read Brown’s full message.

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Cornell University’s New York State Agricultural Experiment Station in Geneva, New York offers a Summer Research Scholars Program where undergraduate students can participate in exciting research projects in one of four disciplines including; Entomology,Food ScienceHorticulture, and Plant Pathology/Plant-Microbe Biology.

The student interns will have the opportunity to work with faculty, their graduate students, postdocs, and staff on research projects that can be laboratory or field-based.

The submission deadline for all application related material is February 13, 2015.

More information.

Find more internship opportunities on the Horticulture Internship blog.

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