Archive for the “Research” Category

 

Kenong Xu's research will help researches change tree architecture allowing more high-density planting and transforming the layout of orchards. (Robyn Wishna photo.)

Kenong Xu’s work will help researchers change tree architecture, allowing more high-density planting and transforming the layout of orchards. (Robyn Wishna photo.)

Cornell Chronicle [2015-01-12]

A Cornell-U.S. government research team is poised to transform the shape of trees and orchards to come, thanks to a $1.5 million grant from the National Science Foundation Plant Genome Research Program.

The project, “Elucidating the Gene Networks Controlling Branch Angle and the Directional Growth of Lateral Meristems in Trees,” is led by Kenong Xu, assistant professor of horticulture at the New York State Agricultural Experiment Station in Geneva, and plant molecular biologist Chris Dardick and research engineer Amy Tabb from the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Appalachian Fruit Research Laboratory in West Virginia.

The research team is seeking to uncover genes and gene networks that underpin how apical control – the inhibitory effect on a lateral branch’s growth by the shoots above it – influences branch growth in apple and peach trees.

Read the whole article.

 

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Susan Brown

Susan Brown

Message from Susan Brown, the Goichman Family Director of the New York State Agricultural Experiment Station and Herman M. Cohn Professor of Agriculture and Life Sciences:

Research and extension at Cornell’s New York State Agricultural Experiment Station —Cornell’s Geneva campus — is addressing challenges and opportunities in specialty crops. We are an integral part of the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, and our faculty have academic homes in the departments of Entomology and Food Science and in the sections of Plant Pathology and Plant-Microbe Biology (PPPMB) and Horticulture in the School of Integrative Plant Science (SIPS).

Our primary focus on fruits and vegetables is complemented by research and extension on additional key plants, including turfgrass, biofuel willow and hops. From investigating and mitigating new diseases and insects, to developing new varieties, or perfecting a food or beverage formulation, Cornell scientists at Geneva have enthusiasm and passion for projects that benefit growers and consumers alike.

Our goal is to produce better food, from almost every aspect imaginable—new varieties with better nutritional quality, better eating quality and resistance to diseases as well as better products from the raw ingredients.  Our scientists also work to develop growing systems that maximize quality in the field, orchard and vineyard;  sharing these techniques with growers produces a superior product for consumers to enjoy.

Several of our programs work directly with growers and entrepreneurs and to troubleshoot their individual problems. The Food Venture Center helps entrepreneurs develop safe new products, the New York State Wine Analytical Laboratory aids producers in solving problems, and our Good Agricultural Practices Program (GAPS) teaches producers to meet and exceed food safety standards for handling produce.  Growers, producers, entrepreneurs, established businesses and consumers benefit directly from our expertise.

Read Brown’s full message.

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Cornell University’s New York State Agricultural Experiment Station in Geneva, New York offers a Summer Research Scholars Program where undergraduate students can participate in exciting research projects in one of four disciplines including; Entomology,Food ScienceHorticulture, and Plant Pathology/Plant-Microbe Biology.

The student interns will have the opportunity to work with faculty, their graduate students, postdocs, and staff on research projects that can be laboratory or field-based.

The submission deadline for all application related material is February 13, 2015.

More information.

Find more internship opportunities on the Horticulture Internship blog.

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Processor and seed company representatives sample frozen peas at NYSAES ‘cuttng’.

Processor and seed company representatives sample frozen peas at NYSAES ‘cuttng’ November 6, 2015.

Jim Ballerstein, Research Support Specialist for Steve Reiners’ vegetable research program has released this year’s processing vegetable variety reports.

In November, more than 40 people attended Ballerstein’s cutting at the New York State Agricultural Experiment Station, Geneva, N.Y. to sample 168 varieties of frozen and canned vegetables taste for themselves how the corn, peas and beans performed.

Find previous years’ reports and more information on Reiner’s research page.

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Lisianthus planting in the high tunnel, Snapdragon trial in late May, harvesting the Ammi field trial, Eucomis in high tunnel.

Lisianthus planting in the high tunnel, Snapdragon trial in late May, harvesting the Ammi field trial, Eucomis in high tunnel. Click image for larger view.

Chris Wien’s 2014 cut flower cultural practice studies and variety trials report is now available online. This year’s research includes:

  • Anemone/Ranunculus trial
  • Sunflower photoperiod reaction
  • Defoliation of peppers with ethephon
  • Lisianthus spacing and topping
  • Celosia comb deformation
  • Snapdragon overwintering high tunnels
  • Delphinium longevity

Wien also reports on variety trials of:

  • Ornamental peppers
  • Ornamental Alliums
  •  Ammi
  • Celosia
  • Cosmos
  • Delphinium
  • Eucomis
  • Filler species: Bupleurum, Euphorbia, Gypsophilum, Eucalyptus, Atriplex
  • Gladioli
  • Poppies
  • Ornamental Cabbage

To see previous years’ reports, visit Wien’s research page.

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From Thomas Björkman:

Hundreds of Cornell alumni gathered at the Astor Center in Greenwich Village for Furrows to Boroughs: A Taste of New York State in New York City, a regional sesquicentennial celebration October 22 hosted by the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences.  The event highlighted the link between tri-state agriculture and Cornell. The culinary work and products of local farmers, agricultural businesses and chefs were on display and available to taste.

Horticultural products featured prominently. Many wines of course, a tremendous pastry designed around Susan Brown’s new SnapDragon apple, and fall berries and vegetables raised with techniques and varieties developed at Cornell. The alumni were not only excited by the great food, but also proud to be part of the institution that helps make it all possible.

I collaborated with chef and native Ithacan Tyler Kord, who has been making a big splash in the New York City restaurant scene by highlighting broccoli in new contexts. He operates the No. 7 restaurant in Fort Greene Brooklyn and has two high-profile sub shops at the Plaza Hotel by Central Park and the Ace Hotel in the financial district where he has popularized both the broccoli sub sandwich and the broccoli taco. This year Short Stack published his cookbook  Broccoli.

At Furrows to Boroughs, Tyler served tacos using broccoli provided by Windflower Farm, operated by former Cornell Cooperative Extension educator Ted Blomgren, who continues to be an avid cooperator on Cornell Horticulture research and extension projects as well as a pioneer for providing fresh produce to the food deserts in the outer boroughs through an active CSA.

As part of the Eastern Broccoli Project, I’m leading a team to develop varieties as well as the production and marketing infrastructure to supply New York City with Northeast broccoli for three months of the year, and have other Eastern regions supply the same buyers for the balance of the year.

Our goal is not to supply all of the Big Apple’s broccoli, but enough to provide regional growers with a profitable alternative enterprise and consumers with a fresher, more flavorful and nutritious product.

The project is funded by the USDA’s  Specialty Crop Research Initiative, and is a collaboration with six other universities, the Agricultural Research Service, seed companies,  distributors and growers.

Tyler Kord prepares broccoli tacos at Furrows to Boroughs.

Tyler Kord prepares broccoli tacos at Furrows to Boroughs.

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'Wee Stinky' at dawn November 14.

‘Wee Stinky’ at dawn November 14.

While it is difficult to predict exactly when, the Cornell University Titan Arum (dubbed ‘Wee Stinky’ when it flowered for the first time in March 2012) is poised to flower again.

Visiting Hours

Visiting Hours: 9:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m.

Hours will be extended once the plant blooms. For updates watch our Twitter and Facebook feeds.

You can also view the titan arum on a live webcamtrack its growth in numbers and images, and read updates on our blog.

Cornell Daily Sun science editor Kathleen Bitter previews the impending bloom in ‘Wee Stinky’ to Bloom For First Time Since 2012.

To learn more about Titan Arums, you can also view the Titan Arum YouTube playlist. Here’s a sample:

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Processor and seed company representatives sample frozen peas at NYSAES ‘cuttng’.

Processor and seed company representatives sample frozen peas at NYSAES ‘cuttng’.

More than 40 people attended the annual fall processing vegetable ‘cutting’ November 6 to sample and compare canned and frozen peas, sweet corn, and snap beans trialed at the New York State Agricultural Experiment Station, Geneva, N.Y.

“It was the best turnout we’ve ever had,” says Jim Ballerstein, the research support specialist who manages the processing vegetable trials.

Attendees included representatives from processing and seed companies, including the top three vegetable seed companies in the world, adds Ballerstein.

The cutting included samples of 50 pea cultivars, 55 snap beans (canned and frozen), and 63 sweet corns (frozen kernel and whole ear).

Learn more about processing vegetable trials at NYSAES.

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Susan Brown

Susan Brown

Tune in this afternoon to hear Susan Brown, associate director of the New York State Agricultural Experiment Station (NYSAES), discuss Apple Science, From American Beauty to Zestar on Science Friday.

The show runs from 2 to 4 p.m. on public radio stations across the country and we expect Susan to be on during the first hour.  (Likely around 2:20 p.m.) You can listen locally on 89.5 FM in Geneva or on 91.5 FM in Ithaca. You can also stream it on ScienceFriday.com or  listen to the podcast after the show airs.

Here’s the episode summary from the SciFri website:

The humble apple wears many faces, from the crisp and crunchy Honeycrisp to the soft and tannic Mac. How did apples get so diverse? Apple breeder Susan Brown explains the ins-and-outs of apple reproduction and reveals how modern plant genetics allows her to “stack the deck” in favor of crisp and sweet offspring. Plus, orchardist and apple historian Dan Bussey introduces us to some weird and wonderful heritage breeds.

 

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Barton Laboratory Greenhouse


Following a multimillion-dollar makeover, the Barton Laboratory Greenhouse was dedicated Oct. 30 at the New York State Agricultural Experiment Station in Geneva, New York. (Photo: Rob Way, CALS Communications)

Cornell Chronicle [2014-11-05]:

Researchers at the New York State Agricultural Experiment Station (NYSAES) in Geneva, New York, have a fully modernized network of greenhouses now that Barton Laboratory Greenhouse’s multimillion-dollar makeover is complete.

During a ribbon-cutting ceremony Oct. 30, NYSAES welcomed New York state Sen. Michael Nozzolio ’73, M.S. ’77, who helped secure a $4.7 million grant for the reconstruction project in April 2013.

Nozzolio (R-54th Dist.) credited the agricultural research conducted at NYSAES with being an economic driver for the region as well as the entire state.

“The research that makes agriculture the number one industry in this state is done here,” Nozzolio said. “The reason why we have over 250 wineries in this state, and well over 110 right in the Finger Lakes region, is because of the research done here. Whether it’s Dr. Susan Brown making new varietals of apples, whether it’s the grape industry, those jobs in the orchards and the vineyards are in large part thanks to the research done here.”

Read the whole article.

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