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NYSAES

Seminar video: Active Canopy Cooling Strategies to Mitigate the Negative Effects of Heatwaves on Grapevines

If you missed Monday’s Horticulture Section and Dreer Award seminar, Active Canopy Cooling Strategies to Mitigate the Negative Effects of Heatwaves on Grapevines with Raquel Kallas, M.P.S. Horticulture ’16 and 2016 Dreer Award winner, it is available online.

More seminar videos: Horticulture | School of Integrative Plant Science

Seminar video: Vegetable Crop Conservation in the U.S. National Plant Germplasm System

If you missed Monday’s Horticulture Section seminar Vegetable Crop Conservation in the U.S. National Plant Germplasm System with Joanne Labate, USDA-ARS Plant Genetic Resources Unit, it is available online.

More seminar videos: Horticulture | School of Integrative Plant Science

Brown’s apple breeding efforts featured in Atlas Obscura

Susan Brown

Apple breeder Susan Brown, professor in the Horticulture Section, explains all that’s involved in selecting and commercializing new apple varieties in an October 20 article Every Apple You Eat Took Years and Years to Make in Atlas Obscura.

“As the head of the apple-breeding program at Cornell University’s New York State Agricultural Experiment Station, one of the largest apple-breeding programs in the world, Brown is searching for fruit that no one has ever seen or tasted before—beautiful apples that can withstand the dangers of the field, that grow uniform and large, that store well, that can be shipped easily to grocery stores, that have deep and satisfying flavors, and that are, above all, crisp and juicy, the two qualities consumers most desire. By harnessing the criss-cross power of genetic variation, she can create new apples, better than any already for sale.”

It took 11 years from cross to commercialization for Snapdragon, one of her latest releases, “one of fastest tracks in apple-breeding history.”

“’Some perennial breeders never get to this stage,’ says Brown. ‘You can retire before you know your variety is a success.’”

Read the whole article.

 

SAGES Cookbook to support Geneva Campus Bike Share

Reposted from the SIPS blog, Discovery that Connects:

Craving some Black Magic Cake, Cherry Stuffed Tenderloin, or Red Lentil Coconut Curry?  These are just some of the thirty nine recipes in the 2017 cookbook assembled by the Student Association of the Geneva Experiment Station (SAGES) to benefit the Geneva Bike Share Program.

Recipes were contributed by faculty, staff, and students on the Geneva campus. SAGES President Adrienne Gorny draws particular attention to those derived from annual Chili Cook-offs, Cookie Bake-Offs, and Underappreciated Vegetable Cook-offs; this last being an event where Geneva campus employees are challenged to produce a dish incorporating a pre-determined underappreciated vegetable. Hannah Swegarden recommends her recipe for Tomato Basil Soup, perfect for this time of year when gardens are bursting with these two ingredients.

Also featured are recipes from a variety of cultural traditions such as George Abawi’s Baklava, several Scandinavian desserts, and Pavlova, described by Sarah Pethybridge as “a famous Australian and New Zealand dessert!”

Available for $14 or two for $25, proceeds from the cookbook sales will be used to support the Bike Share Program at the Geneva campus.  The SAGES Bike Share Program provides bicycles for rent to students and other members of the Geneva station community. Begun in 2014 with a few donated bicycles, the program has grown in the years since. Proceeds from cookbook sales will be used to expand the Bike Share Program by funding repairs of old bikes and purchasing of new ones.  Donations can also be made directly to the program.

Cookbooks are available in the SIPS main office at 135 Plant Science in Ithaca or in Hannah Swegarden’s mailbox in Hedrick Hall, Geneva.  Buy one soon and kick back with a piece of Larry Smart’s PhD Party Pie.  Filled with chocolate, pecans, Kahlua, and Jack Daniels, it’s the cure for whatever ails you!

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Cornell-led project to improve grapes gets big boost

Bruce Reisch

Bruce Reisch

Cornell Chronicle [2017-08-31]

Breeding the next great grape is getting a boost thanks to new funding for a Cornell-led project that uses genomic technology to create varieties that are more flavorful and sustainable.

The project, VitisGen2, is a collaboration of 25 scientists from 11 institutions who are working in multidisciplinary teams to accelerate development of the next generation of grapes. Launched in 2011, the project was recently renewed with a $6.5 million grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Institute of Food and Agriculture, Specialty Crop Research Initiative.

The work has the potential to save millions of dollars annually for the U.S. grape industry – in excess of $100 million in California alone, according to Bruce Reisch, professor of grapevine breeding and genetics in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences (CALS), who co-leads the project with Lance Cadle-Davidson, plant pathologist with the USDA-ARS Grape Genetics Research Unit, both located at Cornell’s New York State Agricultural Experiment Station in Geneva, New York.

VitisGen2’s multipronged model addresses the grape production continuum. An economics team examines the benefits of improving grape varieties. Geneticists identify molecular markers for important traits in grapes, from resistance to diseases like powdery mildew to boosting low-temperature tolerance and fruit quality. Grape-breeding scientists develop new grape varieties that incorporate these traits, and teams of outreach specialists help growers and consumers understand the advantages of newly introduced grape varieties.

The result is a new generation of high-quality grapes that can be grown at lower cost and adapt easily to a range of geographic regions and climates, all with less environmental impact.

“We all stand to benefit in areas ranging from the environment to economic sustainability to improving the profit and quality possibilities for the industry,” Reisch said.

Read the whole article.

 

Students report on research progress at Graduate Field Review

Ph.D. candidate Grant Thompson explains his research on soil bacterial communities in residential lawns during a poster session at the Fall 2017 Horticulture Graduate Field Review.

Ph.D. candidate Grant Thompson explains his research on soil bacterial communities in residential lawns during a poster session at the Fall 2017 Horticulture Graduate Field Review.

The Graduate Field of Horticulture gathered in Jordan Hall at the New York State Agricultural Experiment Station (NYSAES), Geneva, N.Y. for the Fall 2017 Graduate Field Review. A dozen graduate students gave 2-minute “poster pitches” ahead of poster sessions where they detailed their research progress to faculty, staff and fellow students.

Topics ranged from root exudates and reviving nut trees to post-harvest fruit- and flower-quality and Reisling grape clone trials. Two students gave longer talks on their research into grape cold hardiness and apple acidity genetics.

The Horticulture Graduate Field Review is held twice a year just ahead of the start of Spring and Fall Semester classes.

Graduate Field of Horticulture, August 17, 2017, Jordan Hall, Geneva.

Graduate Field of Horticulture, August 17, 2017, Jordan Hall, Geneva.

 

Berry for Your Thoughts: Contest Seeks Name for Grape

The new breed of grape is remarkable for the large size of its berries. Photo by Bruce Reisch/CALS.

The new breed of grape is remarkable for the large size of its berries. Photo by Bruce Reisch/CALS.

Reposted from CALS news [2017-06-19]

Big on flavor, aroma and size, Cornell’s newest grape lacks one defining feature: a name. Grape breeder Bruce Reisch ’76 spent years developing the grape, and now he’s offering the public the chance to name it.

Currently dubbed NY98.0228.02, the grape is a seedless, flavorful berry with the attractive blue coloring of a Concord at nearly double the size. Reisch, professor of grapevine breeding and genetics in the Horticulture Section of the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, said the new variety is well adapted to the Northeast, with good cold-tolerance for most of the Eastern states, including New York, Pennsylvania, Maryland and New Jersey.

“This grape is the first truly seedless Concord-type and has naturally large, attractive berries,” said Reisch. The Concord has long been an American favorite, known best for its use in grape juice, jellies and jams.

“Our new grapes weigh 5 or 6 grams per berry, almost twice the weight of a traditional Concord,” said Reisch. “It’s pretty rare to find a grape that size, especially with such full flavor.”

Read the whole article.

This article also appeared in the Cornell Chronicle.

NYSAES awards

From Thomas Björkman:

June 2 was awards day at the New York State Agricultural Experiment Station in Geneva. Among those recognized:

Research Associate, and Tree Fruit Horticulture interim leader, Poliana Francescatto presents technician (and grad student) Peter Herzeele with the Perrine scholarship

Research Associate and Tree Fruit Horticulture interim leader Poliana Francescatto presents technician (and grad student) Peter Herzeele with the Perrine scholarship.

Justine Vanden Heuvel welcomes Shaulis Scholar Quinlan Corbett, an viticulture student from Finger Lakes Community College who will be working on molecular virology with Mark Fuchs. Quinlan is starting into viticulture from a background in acting.

Justine Vanden Heuvel welcomes Shaulis Scholar Quinlan Corbett (left), a viticulture student from Finger Lakes Community College who will be working on molecular virology with Mark Fuchs. Quinlan comes to viticulture from a background in acting.

John Keeton in the clonal repository has worked in many roles of caring for horticultural crops in his 25 years of service.

John Keeton in the clonal repository has worked in many roles of caring for horticultural crops in his 25 years of service.

Rob Martens receives recognition for 10 years of service from Bill Srmack, head of farm operations for the germplasm collection.

Rob Martens receives recognition for 10 years of service from Bill Srmack, head of farm operations for the germplasm collection.

Horticulture administrative assistant LouAnn Rago is recognized by section chair Steve Reiners for 15 years of service at the Station.

Horticulture administrative assistant Lou Ann Rago is recognized by section chair Steve Reiners for 15 years of service at the Station.

Björkman named ASHS fellow

Björkman

Björkman

From Horticulture Section chair Steve Reiners:

Please join me in congratulating our colleague, Thomas Björkman, for his being named a Fellow of the American Society for Horticultural Science.

Fellow is the highest honor that ASHS bestows on its members and recognizes truly outstanding contributions to the science, profession, or industry of horticulture.

Thomas will be honored at the upcoming ASHS Conference in Hawaii later this year.

Congratulations Thomas.

In the news: Seed to Supper, hard cider course, ag career day

hofo plant sale

From University Photo’s May 2 Picture Cornell feature: Hortus Forum member Patty Chan helps a customer at the club’s plant sale on Ho Plaza at Spring Fest on April 20. The club will have a bedding plant sale featuring vegetable and flower transplants May 19 from 3 to 6 p.m. and May 20 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Kenneth Post Laboratories. (Photo: Jason Koski/University Photograph)

A roundup of recent news:

Seed to Supper Connects Students with the Community – Marcia Eames-Sheavly’s Seed to Supper two-semester course sequence is part of a statewide Seed to Supper initiative that connects Cornell Cooperative Extension offices with local food banks and volunteer educators who teach adults on a limited budget how to garden and grow their own food, thereby creating more food-secure communities.[CALS News 2017-05-02, Cornell Chronicle 2017-05-02]

As presenter at the 2017 Building the Agricultural Intellect of the Finger Lakes Youth Career Day, Larry Smart, associate professor of plant breeding and genetics, showed high school students some of the tools he uses in his research at the New York State Agricultural Experiment Station in Geneva, New York.

As presenter at the 2017 Building the Agricultural Intellect of the Finger Lakes Youth Career Day, Larry Smart, associate professor of plant breeding and genetics, showed high school students some of the tools he uses in his research at the New York State Agricultural Experiment Station in Geneva, New York.

Agriculture Career Day Exposes Teens to Diverse Fields – From dairy robotics and precision farming technology to the chemistry of wine making and integrated pest management, jobs in agriculture dot a diverse and varied career map in the Finger Lakes. Helping area high school students navigate ag-related vocational opportunities was the goal of the 2017 Building the Agricultural Intellect of the Finger Lakes Youth Career Day April 26. [CALS News 2017-05-04, Cornell Chronicle 2017-05-04]

Course teaches hard cider production, from fruit to fermentation – To prepare students to become leaders in the burgeoning cider industry, Gregory Peck, assistant professor in the Horticulture Section of the School of Integrative Plant Science.and Kathleen Arnink, lecturer in the viticulture and enology program in the Department of Food Science, initiated a cider production lecture and laboratory course. The first of its kind in the country, the course teaches the full cycle of production, from growing apples to fermenting cider. [CALS News 2017-05-04, Cornell Chronicle 2017-05-02]

students in pounder

In Cornell Botanic Gardens’ Pounder Vegetable Garden, gardener Emily Detrick (left, MPS Public Garden Leadership ’16) shows Organic Vegetable Gardening (PLHRT 1250) students how to use fabric row covers to protect young crops from insect pests. Horticulture chair Steve Reiners teaches the course.

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