Archive for the “NYSAES” Category

 

bioenergy-coverx400Images from Larry Smart‘s shrub willow bioenergy crop research program are featured on the June issue of the Journal BioEnergy Research.

Smart and grad student Eric Fabio are among the co-authors of the article Untapped Potential: Opportunities and Challenges for Sustainable Bioenergy Production from Marginal Lands in the Northeast USA in the issue.

Find out more about Smart’s research program at his Willowpedia website.

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Researchers Provide Information Farmers Need to Improve Production, Quality of Crops
[Time-Warner Cable News 2015-05-11]

GENEVA, N.Y. — Out on a field at the New York State Agriculture Experiment Station, professor Larry Smart is growing shrub willow. Every two or three years, the stems are harvested and turned into wood chips. Those chips heat two buildings at the center. …

“Our mission is to apply cutting edge science to improve agriculture in New York State, in the Northeast, across the U.S. and even across the world if we can,” said Smart.

Susan Brown is also featured. She says:

“Our vegetable growers will say when people enjoy a carrot or cabbage; they don’t realize the research that goes into it. You know that bumper sticker that says if you have food, thank a farmer? Thank a researcher as well,” said Brown.

Read the whole article/view video.

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If you missed Monday’s Horticulture Section seminar, Genomics-assisted breeding of triploid hybrids of shrub willow for bioenergy, with Horticulture associate professor Larry Smart, it’s available online.

More seminar videos: Horticulture | School of Integrative Plant Science

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Cornell berry breeder Courtney WeberReposted from Station Notes, [2015-03-02]

March 2, Cornell University joined a number of its peers nationwide in announcing the official launch of the National Land-grant Impacts website, a centralized online resource that highlights the teaching, research and extension efforts by Land-grant universities.

The website provides access to university or regional-specific impact stories, which document the research and extension programming planned, performed,and implemented by Cornell and other land-grant universities. The website, as a cooperative effort of these institutions, represents a collective voice for the agricultural experiment station and cooperative extension arms of the land-grant universities.

“The Land-Grant Impacts website is a new tool that will better inform the American people and the international community of the significant agricultural research, education and extension impacts taking place at land grant universities across our nation, which offer practical solutions to today’s critical societal challenges,” said Sonny Ramaswamy, director of the National Institute of Food and Agriculture at the U.S. Department of Agriculture. “This website will help policy makers and the public learn more about this work that is partially supported with NIFA funding.”

Read the whole article.

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CALS Communications

Greenhouse ribbon-cutting at the New York Agricultural Experiment Station, Geneva, N.Y., October 2014. Photo: Rob Way, CALS Communications.

Reposted from CALS Notes [2015-02-24]

It was a year of promises and deliveries, of new partnerships and the research and outreach results those relationships fuel. For Cornell’s New York State Agricultural Experiment Station in Geneva, 2014 will be remembered as a very good year.

Here are a few of the highlights:

  • The Northern Grapes Project, led by senior extension associate Tim Martinson, received a $2.6 million USDA grant to continue developing grape growing, wine making and marketing resources for cold climate grape growers.
  • Susan Brown, incoming Station director and faculty in the Horticulture Section, was named a 2014 “Women of Distinction” in a ceremony at the State Capitol.
  • Sarah Pethybridge was hired as an assistant professor in the Plant Pathology and Plant-Microbe Biology Section, Steve Reiners assumed the position of associate chair of the Horticulture Section, Anna Katharine Mansfield was promoted to associate professor in the Department of Food Science, and Jennifer Grant was named director of the New York State Integrated Pest Management Program.
  • The Station completed its 10th year of boosting science literacy through a plant science program for the Geneva City School District’s third and fourth graders.
  • The Summer Research Scholars Program hosted 27 students from top universities around the country for immersion in agricultural research.

And that’s just a start.

Read all the highlights in the Station’s “2014 Year in Review” available online on the NYSAES homepage: nysaes.cals.cornell.edu.

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If you missed it last week, Alan Taylor was featured on a Growing Green segment on Time-Warner Cable News: How Can You Protect Your Seeds from Diseases? Taylor is a professor in the Horticulture Section based at the New York State Agricultural Experiment Station in Geneva.

“What the seed treatment would do is it would protect the seed from an attack by an insect or disease. It would be a particular material or agent that’s applied to seeds to go ahead and protect them,” said Taylor.

View the video.

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Rhoda Maurer

Rhoda Maurer

Reposted from CALS Notes [2015-02-04]:

Rhoda Maurer from Geneva, NY has been named Director of Horticulture at Cornell Plantations beginning February 1, 2015. Prior to joining Plantations, she managed the grounds and greenhouses of Cornell University’s NY State Agriculture Experiment Station in Geneva, NY.

Before her tenure at Cornell, Maurer was the assistant curator at the Scott Arboretum of Swarthmore College, and has held other positions at The Elisabeth C. Miller Botanical Garden in Seattle, Washington, and the Royal Horticulture Society’s Wisley Garden in the United Kingdom.

Read the whole article.

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Know what you’ll be doing this summer? If you’re looking for some great career-related, hands-on experience, now is the time to be pinning down that summer internship that matches your interests. Here are some Cornell-related opportunities of horticultural interest (and their application deadline):

Find more opportunities — on farms, in greenhouses and labs, at public gardens and more, in Ithaca and around the world —  on the Horticulture internships blog.

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Thompson receives his award from NEWSS Past President Dwight Lingenfelter

Thompson receives his award from NEWSS Past President Dwight Lingenfelter

Horticulture PhD student Grant Thompson (Kao-Kniffin Lab) won best graduate student presentation (out of 18 entries) place at the 69th Annual Meeting of the  Northeastern Weed Science Society (NEWSS) January 6 in Williamsburg, Va. Thompson’s talk  was titled “Investigating the effects of Pale Swallowwort (Vincetoxicum rossicum) on soil microbial processes.” Congratulations Grant!

The Scientist: Prof. Bruce Reisch Develops New Grape Varieties [Cornell Daily Sun 2015-01-21] – “If I have a disease resistant, cold hardy grape but it makes terrible wine, nobody would plant it. If I have a disease resistant grape that makes fantastic wine but doesn’t survive the winter, very few people would plant it,” Reisch said. “What is really important is getting the combination of traits into one variety.”

Eye on the next generation: New Ag Station director looking toward the future [Finger Lakes Times 2015-01-19] – When people bite into an apple, slice a tomato or sip a glass of wine, Susan Brown hopes they will remember the local research that may have made it possible.

Hard Cider a Big, But Complex, Opportunity [Lancaster Farming 2015-01-17] – Millennials, the current generation of young adults, are driving the hard cider boom. They are more willing than previous generations to spend money on good food and alcohol, said Ian Merwin, a Cornell University professor emeritus and owner of Black Diamond Farm in Trumansburg, N.Y.

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Kenong Xu's research will help researches change tree architecture allowing more high-density planting and transforming the layout of orchards. (Robyn Wishna photo.)

Kenong Xu’s work will help researchers change tree architecture, allowing more high-density planting and transforming the layout of orchards. (Robyn Wishna photo.)

Cornell Chronicle [2015-01-12]

A Cornell-U.S. government research team is poised to transform the shape of trees and orchards to come, thanks to a $1.5 million grant from the National Science Foundation Plant Genome Research Program.

The project, “Elucidating the Gene Networks Controlling Branch Angle and the Directional Growth of Lateral Meristems in Trees,” is led by Kenong Xu, assistant professor of horticulture at the New York State Agricultural Experiment Station in Geneva, and plant molecular biologist Chris Dardick and research engineer Amy Tabb from the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Appalachian Fruit Research Laboratory in West Virginia.

The research team is seeking to uncover genes and gene networks that underpin how apical control – the inhibitory effect on a lateral branch’s growth by the shoots above it – influences branch growth in apple and peach trees.

Read the whole article.

 

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